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VOL. VIII 



THE MAINE BULLETIN 



NOVEMBER, 1905 



NO. 3 



CATALOGUE 



OF 



The University of Maine 




PERMANENT FILE OF 

COUNCIL ON 
MEDICAL EDUCATION 



1905-1906 



Published Monthly by the University 

Entered at the Post Office at Orono, Maine, as second class matter 



£>> 



KEY TO MAP 



Athletic Field. 

Grand Stand. 

Beta Theta Pi 
House. 

Tennis Courts. 

Pumping Station. 

Janitor's House. 

Dormitory and 
Commons. 

Wingate Hall. 

Fernald Hall. 

Power House. 

Alumni Hall. 

Art Guild and Y. 
M. C A. Building. 

Coburn Hall. 

President's House. 

Observatory. 

Horticult ural 
Buildings. 

Experiment Sta- 
tion. 

Professors'Houses. 

Stable. 

Dairy Building. 

Barns. 

Farm Superintend-, 
ent's House. 

Professor's House. 

Kappa Sigma 
House. 

(Mount Vernon 
House. 

Phi Gamma Delta 
House. 

B. O. & O. Wait- 
ing Rooms, 

Lord Hall. 

Theta E p s i 1 o n 
House. 

Phi Kappa Sigma 
House. 

Sigma Alpha Ep- 
silon House. 

Storehouse. 

Infirmary. 

Library. 

Farm Buildings. 




• 






,-* 







ll 



. 



CATALOGUE 



OF THE 



UNIVERSITY OF MAINE 



1905-1906 




ORONO, MAINE 



AUGUSTA, MAINE 
KENNEBEC JOURNAL PRINT 

1905 



K.L. 



CALENDAR 



FALL TERM, 1905 



September 18, 
September 19, 
September 20, 
September 21, 
November 21, 
November 29, 
December 4, 
December 8, 
December 22, 
December 29, 



Monday. 

Tuesday, 

Wednesday, 

Thursday, 

Tuesday, 

Wednesday, 

Monday, 

Friday, 

Friday, 

Friday, 



January 2, Tuesday, 
February 2, Friday, 



Arrearage examinations begin. 
Entrance examinations begin. 
Registration begins, 1.30 P. M. 
Fall term begins. 

Meeting of the Board of Trustees. 
Thanksgiving recess begins, 12 M. 
Thanksgiving recess ends, 7.45 A. M. 
Sophomore prize declamations. 
Christmas recess begins, 5.30 P. M. 
Arrearage examinations begin 
(Spring term studies). 

1906 
Christmas recess ends, 12 M. 
Fall term ends. 



February 3, Saturday, 
February 5, Monday, 
April 18, Wednesday, 
April 23, Monday, 

April 25, Wednesday, 
June 9, Saturday, 
June 10, Sunday, 
June 11, Monday, 
June 11, Monday, 
June 11, Monday, 
June 12, Tuesday, 
June 12, Tuesday, 
June 12, Tuesday, 
June 13, Wednesday, 
June 13, Wednesday, 
June 13, Wednesday, 
June 13, Wednesday, 
June 14, Thursday, 
July 2, Monday, 
August 3, Friday, 






SPRING TERM, 1906 

Registration. 

Spring term begins. 

Easter recess begins, 5.30 P. IVi 

Arrearage examinations begin 

(TcH term studies). 
Easter recess ends, 7.45 A. M. 
Junior exhibition. 
Baccalaureate address. 
Convocation. 
Class day. 

Reception by the President. 
Meeting of the Board of Trustees. 
Receptions by the fraternities. 
Address before the Phi Kappa Phi Society. 
Commencement. 
Commencement dinner. 
Meeting of the Alumni Association. 
Commencement concert. 
Entrance examinations begin. 
Summer term begins. 
Summer term ends. 

3 



HI 



370922 



The University of Maine 

FALL TERM, 1906 

September 17, Monday, Arrearage examinations begin. 

September 18, Tuesday, Entrance examinations begin. 

September 19, Wednesday. Registration begins, 1.30 t. M. 
September 20, Thursday, Fall term begins. 

November 27, Tuesday, Meeting of the Board oi Trustees. 

November 28, Wednesday, Thanksgiving recess begins, 12 M. 
December 3, Monday, Thanksgiving recess ends, 7.45 A. M. 

December 7, Friday, Sophomore prize declamations. 

December 21, Friday, Christmas recess begins, 5.30 P. M. 

December 29, Saturday, Arrearage examinations begin 

(Spring term studies). 



January 1, Tuesday, 
February 1, Friday, 



1907 
Christmas recess ends, 12 M. 
Fall term ends. 



February 2, Saturday, 
February 4, Monday, 
June 12, Wednesday, 



SPRING TERM, 1907 

Registration. 
Spring term begins. 

Commencement. 



CALENDAR OF THE COLLEGE OF LAW 



1905 
October 4, Wednesday, Fall term begins. 
December 20, Wednesday, Fall term ends. 

1906 
January 10, Wednesday, Winter term begins. 
March 21, Wednesday, Winter term ends. 
March 28, Wednesday, Spring term begins. 
June 13, Wednesday, Commencement. 
October 3, Wednesday, Fall term begins. 
December 19, Wednesday, Fall term ends. 



1907 
January 9, Wednesday, Winter term begins. 
March 20, Wednesday, Winter term ends. 
March 27, Wednesday, Spring term begins. 
June 12, Wednesday, Commencement. 
4 



The University of Maine 



THE BOARD OF TRUSTEES 



Hon. HENRY LORD, President 
Hon. ELLIOTT WOOD, Secretary 
Hon. EDWARD BRACKETT WINSLOW 
Hon. JOHN ALFRED ROBERTS, M. A. 
Hon. VORANUS LATHROP COFFIN 
Hon. ALBERT JOSEPH DURGIN 
Hon. CHARLES LESTER JONES 
EDWIN JAMES HASKELL, B. S. 



3angor 

Winthrop 

Portland 

Norway 

Harrington 

Orono 

Corinna 

Westbrook 



EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 

Trustees LORD and WINSLOW 



TREASURER 

Hon. ISAIAH KIDDER STETSON, Ph. B. 



Bangor 



ADVISORY BOARD FOR THE COLLEGE OF LAW 

Hon. CHARLES HAMLIN, M. A., President Bangor 

Hon. HENRY BRADS'lREET CLEAVES Portland 

Hon. ALBERT MOORE SPEAR Gardiner 

Hon. WILLIAM THOMAS HAINES, LL. D. Waterville 

Hon. HERBERT MILTON HEATH, M. A. Augusta 

Hon. ANDREW PETERS WISWELL. LL. D. Ellsworth 

Dean WILLIAM EMANUEL WALZ, M. A., LL. B., Secretary 

Bangor 



The University of Maine 



THE EXPERIMENT STATION COUNCIL 



Committee of 
Board of Trustees 



President GEORGE EMORY FELLOWS, Ph. D., LL. D. President 
Director CHARLES DAYTON WOODS, Sc. D. Secretary 

JOHN ALFRED ROBERTS, M. A., Norway j 
ALBERT JOSEPH DURGIN, Orono [ 

CHARLES LESTER JONES, Corinna 
AUGUSTUS Wm. GILMAN, Foxcroft Commissioner of Agriculture 
EUGENE HARVEY LIBBY, Auburn State Grange 

CHARLES S. POPE, Manchester State Pomological Society 

RUTILLUS ALDEN, Winthrop State Dairymen's Association 



JAMES MONROE BARTLETT, M. S. 
LUCIUS HERBERT MERRILL, B. S. 
FREMONT LINCOLN RUSSELL, V. S. 
WELTON MARKS MUNSON, Ph. D. 
GILBERT MOTTIER GOWELL, M. S. 
EDITH MARION PATCH, B. S. 



Members 

of the 

Station Staff 



The University of Maine 



ALUMNI ASSOCIATIONS 



THE GENERAL ASSOCIATION 

President, J. M. Oak, '73, Bangor 

Secretary, F. L. Russell, '85, Orono 

Corresponding Secretary, R. K. Jones, '86, Orono 

Treasurer, A. H. Brown, '90, Oldtown 

Necrologist, J. N. Hart, '85, Orono 

Alumni Members of the Athletic Association, G. E. Thompson, '91, 

Orono, E. H. Kelley, '90, Bangor, A. L. Bird, 'oo, Rockland 

The West Maine Association 

President, R. W. Eaton, '73, Brunswick. 
Secretary and Treasurer, A. C. Wescott, '99, 7 Exchange St., Portland 

The North Maine Association 

President, Harvey B. Thayer, '73, Presque Isle 

Secretary, N. H. Martin, '76, Fort Fairfield 

The Boston Association 

President, Edward E. Palmer, '99, 84 State St. 

Secretary, Samuel D. Thompson, '01, Wollaston, Mass. 

The New York Association 

President, Ambrose H. White, '90, 30 Broad St. 

Secretary, Chas. G. Cushman, '89, 30 Broad St. 

The Washington (D. C.) Association 

President, F. Lamson-Scribner, '73, Department of Agriculture 

Secretary, George P. Merrill, '79, National Museum 

The Penobscot Valley Association 

President, Charles E. Oak, '76, Bangor 

Secretary, Frank H. Damon, '95, Bangor 

7 



The University of Maine 

The Western Association 

President, C. W. Rogers, '76, 1896 Aldine Ave., Chicago 

First Vice-President, G. E. Fernald, '78, Wilmette, 111. 

Second Vice-President, Wm. Webber, '84, 889 S. Sawyer Ave., Chicago 

Secretary and Treasurer, F. M. Davis, '01, 5741 Monroe Ave., Chicago 

Executive Committee, E. H. Beckler, '76, H. W. Sewall, '02, 

M. C. Wiley, '03, F. L. Douglass, '03 

The Pittsburg Association 

President, A. G. Mitchell, '75, 6007 Walnut St. 

Vice-President, G. W. Hutchinson, '93, Greensburg, Pa. 

Secretary and Treasurer, H. E. Cole, '02, 1023 Park Building 

The Schenectady Association 

President, J. G. Lurvey, '00, 1206 State St. 

Vice-President, C. N. Rackliffe, '02, 1206 State St. 

Secretary, H. E. Duren, '02, 306 Lafayette St. 

Treasurer, H. F. Hoxie, '99, 940 State St. 

Executive Committee, C. W. Bartlett, '01, H. P. Mayo, '99, 

H. E. Duren, '02 

The Kennebec Valley Association 

President, D. H. Perkins, '00, Skowhegan 

Secretary, E. A. Parker, '04, Skowhegan 

Treasurer, Harold Cook, '00, Waterville 

Executive Committee, D. W. Colby, '85; Harold Cook, '00; John 

Steward, '91 ; D. H. Perkins, '00 ; John Burleigh, '87 

Legislative Committee, Samuel Gould, '77, Wm. T. Haines, '76, 

Roy Flynt, '04 



The University of Maine 



OFFICERS OF ADMINISTRATION 



GEORGE EMORY FELLOWS, President 

JAMES NORRIS HART, Dean 

JAMES STACY STEVENS, Dean in the Coeeege of Arts and 

Sciences 
CHARLES DAYTON WOODS, Director of the Experiment Station 
WILLIAM EMANUEL WALZ, Dean in the Coeeege oe Law 
ELIZABETH ABBOTT BALENTINE, Secretary of the Facuety 



*THE FACULTY OF INSTRUCTION AND 
INVESTIGATION. 



GEORGE EMORY FELLOWS, Ph. D., L. H. D., LL. D. Campus 

President 

Professor of History 

MERRITT CALDWELL FERNALD, Ph. D., LL. D., 54 Main Street 

Professor of Philosophy 
ALFRED BELLAMY AUBERT, M. S. 53 Main Street 

Professor of Chemistry 

ALLEN ELLINGTON ROGERS, M. A. College Street 

Professor of Civics and Constitutional Law 

JAMES MONROE BARTLETT, M. S. College Street 

Chemist in the Experiment Station 

LUCIUS HERBERT MERRILL, B. S. 14 Bennoch Street 

Professor of Biological Chemistry, and Chemist in the Experiment 

Station 

JAMES NORRIS HART, C. E., M. S. Campus 

Professor of Mathematics and Astronomy 

Dean 

FREMONT LINCOLN RUSSELL, B. S., V. S. North Main Street 
Professor of Biology, and Veterinarian of the Experiment Station 



* Arranged in groups in order of seniority of appointment. 

9 



The University of Maine 



WELTON MARKS MUNSON, Ph. D. 76 Main Street 

Professor of Horticulture, and Horticulturist of the Experiment 

Station 

HORACE MELVYN ESTABROOKE, M. A. 80 Main Street 

Professor of English 

JAMES STACY STEVENS, M. S. 99 Main Street 

Professor of Physics 

Dean in the College oe Arts and Sciences 

GILBERT MOTTIER GOWELL, M. S. Campus 

Professor of Animal Industry. In charge of Poultry Experiments 

in the Experiment Station 

CHARLES DAYTON WOODS, Sc. D. 55 Main Street 

Director of the Experiment Station 

JOHN HOMER HUDDILSTON, Ph. D. 105 Main Street 

Professor of Greek 

WILLIAM EMANUEL WALZ, M. A., LL. B. 183 Cedar St., Bangor 
Professor of Law 
Dean in the College oe Law 
GILMAN ARTHUR DREW, Ph. D. 

Professor of Biology 
WILBUR FISK JACKMAN, B. S., Ph. C. 

Professor of Pharmacy 
RALPH KNEELAND JONES, B. S. 

Librarian 
* ORLANDO FAULKLAND LEWIS, Ph. D. 

Professor of Germanic Languages 

CHARLES J. SYMMONDS, Captain 12th U. S. Cavalry 47 Main St. 

Professor of Military Science and Tactics, and Physical Director 



College Street 



38 Pine Street 



26 Bennoch Street 



WILLIAM DANIEL HURD, B. S. 

Professor of Agronomy 
JACOB BERNARD SEGALL, Ph. D. 

Professor of Romance Languages 
HAROLD SHERBURNE BOARDMAN, C. E. 

Professor of Civil Engineering 
GEORGE DAVIS CHASE, Ph. D. 

Professor of Latin 
GORDON EDWIN TOWER, B. S., M. F. 

Professor of Forestry 



Campus 



Mill Street 



57 Main Street 



59 Main Street 



Campus 



* Absent on leave. 



10 



The University of Maine 

WALTER KIERSTEAD GANONG, B. Sc. 28 Bennoch Street 

Acting Professor of Electrical Engineering 
MAX CARL GUENTHER LENTZ, 12 Mill Street 

Acting Professor of Germanic Languages 
ARTHUR CRAWFORD JEWETT, B. S. Mill Street 

\ Associate Professor of Mechanical Engineering. (In Charge of the 

Department) 

CAROLINE COLVIN, Ph. D. Campus 

Assistant Professor of History 

EDGAR MYRICK SIMPSON, B. A. 5 Broadway, Bangor 

Assistant Professor of Law 

CHARLES PARTRIDGE WESTON, C. E., M. A. College Street 

Assistant Professor of Mechanics and Drawing. (In Charge of 

the Department) 

GUY ANDREW THOMPSON, M. A. College Street 

Assistant Professor of English 

EDITH MARION PATCH, B. S. 36 Main Street 

Entomologist to the Experiment Station 



EUGENE LOUIS RAICHE 

Instructor in French. (Summer Term.) 
JAMES PERRY WORDEN, Ph. D. 

Instructor in German. (Summer Term.) 
ARTHUR GUY TERRY, Ph. M. 

Instructor in History. (Summer Term.) 

ARCHER LEWIS GROVER, B. S. 

Instructor in Drawing 
BERTRAM LEIGH FLETCHER, LL. B. 28 Second 

Instructor in Agency. 
GEORGE HENRY WORSTER, LL. B. 234 Center 

Instructor in Insurance 

THOMAS BUCK, B. S. 

Instructor in Mathematics 

HENRY MARTIN SHUTE, M. A. 

Instructor in Modem Languages 

HORACE PARLIN HAMLIN, B. S. 

Instructor in Civil Engineering. 
II 



Campus 

Campus 

Mill Street 

14 Mill Street 

Street, Bangor 

Street, Bangor 

88 Main Street 

44 Main Street 

97 Main Street 



The University of Maine 

MARSHALL BAXTER CUMMINGS, M. S. College Street 

Instructor in Botany 

GRANT TRAIN DAVIS, B. A. 57 Main Street 

Instructor in' Chemistry 

ARTHUR WILLIAMS COLE, B. S. 3 Middle Street 

Instructor in Shop Work 

HARLEY RICHARD WILLARD, M. A. 2 Middle Street 

Instructor in Mathematics 
BARTLETT BROOKS, B. A., LL. B. 10 Columbia Building, Bangor 

Instructor in Contracts. 
RAYMOND KURTZ MORLEY, M. A 61 Main Street 

Instructor in Mathematics 

EVERETT WILLARD DAVEE Main Street 

Instructor in Wood and Iron Work 
ARTHUR WITTER GILBERT, M. S. 26 Main Street 

Instructor in Agronomy 
MATTHEW HUME BEDFORD, Ph. D. 53 Main Street 

Instructor in Chemistry 

HOWARD DOTY CARPENTER, M. A. Pine Street 

Instructor in Electrical Engineering 

THOMAS McCHEYNE GUNN, B. S., M. A. 12 Bennoch Street 

Instructor in Mechanical Engineering 

WALTER EVERETT PRINCE, M. A. 8 Forest Avenue 

Instructor in English. 
WILLIAM ROSS HAM, B. A. 293 State Street, Bangor 

Instructor in Physics 



FOREST JOHN MARTIN, LL. B. 105 Cumberland Street, Bangor 

Resident Lecturer on Common Law Pleading and Maine Practice 
HUGO CLARK, C. E. 5 Broadway, Bangor 

Resident Lecturer on Equity Pleading and Practice 
CHARLES HAMLIN, M. A. 25 Fifth Street, Bangor 

Lecturer on Bankruptcy and Federal Procedure 
LUCILIUS ALONZO EMERY, LL. D. Ellsworth 

Lecturer on Roman Law and Probate Law 

ANDREW PETERS WISWELL, LL. D. Ellsworth 

Lecturer on Evidence 

12 



The University of Maine 

TOUIS CARVER SOUTHARD. M. S., IX. D. 

Lecturer on Medico -Legal Relations. 



Boston 



IRA MELLEN BEARCE, B. S. Campus 

Tutor in Physics 

HERMAN HERBERT HANSON, B. S. 61 Main Street 

Assistant Chemist in the Experiment Station 



CLARA ESTELLE PATTERSON 

Assistant Librarian 



20 Main Street 



Orono House 



STEPHEN JOHN FARRELL 

Assistant in Physical Training 

LAURENCE THEODORE ERNST Bennoch Street 

Assistant in Horticulture 

BESSIE GERALDINE LEEDS, B. A. 57 Main Street 

Assistant in the Experiment Station 
•RALPH LOWE SEABURY, B. S. Myrtle Street 

Assistant in Chemistry 
FLORENCE BALENTINE, B. S. College Street 

Assistant in Biology 
XEWIS IRVING NURENBERG, B. S. 2 Forest Avenue 

Assistant Chemist in the Experiment Station 

.ADELBERT WELLS SPRAGUE, B. S. 217 Union Street, Bangor 

Assistant in English 



13 



The University of Maine 



^STANDING COMMITTEES OF THE FACULTY 

Admission to College 
President Fellows, Dean Hart, Dean Stevens (sub-committee), Professor 
Aubert, Professor Chase, Professor Colvin. Professor Drew, Professor 
Estabrooke, Professor Huddilston, Professor Segall. 

Admission to Examinations 
Professor Fernald, Professor Ganong. Professor Weston. 

Advanced Degrees 
Professor Fernald, Professor Chase, Professor Colvin, Professor Esta- 
brooke, Professor Walz, Professor Weston. 

Approved Tutors 
Dean Hart, Secretary Balentine. 

Athletics 
Mr. Jones, Professor Boardman. Mr. Grover. 

Bachelor's Degree 
Professor Stevens, Professor Colvin. Professor Weston. 

Bulletins 
Mr. Jones, Professor Merrill, Professor Thompson. 

Catalogue 
Professor Stevens (Editor), Professor Hurd, Professor Jewett. 

Debate 
Professor Estabrooke, Mr. Prince. Professor Rogers. 

Delinquent Students 

Professor Boardman, Mr. Buck, Mr. Davis, Professor Munson, 

Professor Thompson. 



* The member whose name is printed first is the chairman of the 
committee. 

14 



The University of Maine 

Entrance Examinations 
Professor Stevens. 

Fitting Schools 
Professor Estabrooke, Professor Chase, Professor Fernald, Professor 
Hart, Professor Huddilston, Piofessor Stevens, Professor Thompson. 

Health 

Professor Rogers, Professor Colvin, Professor Jackman, Professor 

Russell, Professor Symmonds. 

Honors 

Professor Stevens, Professor Drew, Professor Huddilston, Professor 

Lentz, Professor Munson. 

Lectures 
Professor Drew, Professor Chase, Professor Segall. 

Library 
Mr. Jones, Professor Colvin, Professor Estabrooke, Professor Jackman. 

Military Work 
Capt. Symmonds, Professor Jewett, Director Woods. 

Musical Organisations 
Mr. Jones, Professor Hurd, Professor Tower. 

Press 
Mr. Jones, Mr. Morley, Professor Thompson. 

Registration 
Dean Hart, Dean Stevens, Professor Drew, Professor Thompson. 

Rules 
Director Woods, Professor Munson, Professor Stevens. 

Summer Term 

Dean Stevens. 

15 



The University of Maine 

Student Advisers 

For Freshmen in all courses : Dean Hart. 

For all other students : the head of the department in which their major 

subject is taken. 

Tuition Loans 
President Fellows, Professor Fernald, Professor Rogers. 

The University Council 

Faculty Members : President Fellows, Professor Boardman, Professor 

Hart, Professor Stevens. 

Seniors: Mr. Butterworth, Mr. Campbell, Mr. Stanford. 

Juniors: Mr. Lekberg, Mr. Malloy. 



16 



The University of Maine 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MAINE 
ESTABLISHMENT 

By an act of Congress, approved July 2, 1862, it was provided that 
there should be granted to the states, from the public lands, " thirty 
thousand acres for each Senator and Representative in Congress," from 
the sale of which there should be established a perpetual fund, " the 
interest of which shall be inviolably appropriated by each state which 
may take and claim the benefit of this act, • to the endowment, support 
and maintenance of at least one college where the leading object shall be, 
without excluding other scientific and classical studies, and including 
military tactics, to teach such branches of learning as are related to 
agriculture and the mechanic arts, in such manner as the legislatures of 
the slates may respectively prescribe, in order to promote the liberal and 
practical education of the industrial classes in the several pursuits and 
professions in life." The act forbade the use of any portion of the 
principal or interest of this fund for the purchase, erection, or main- 
tenance of buildings and required each state taking the benefit of the 
provisions of the act " to provide within five years not less than one 
college " to carry out the purposes of the act. 

Maine accepted this grant in 1863, and in 1865 constituted " a body 
politic and corporate, by the name of the Trustees of the State College 
of Agriculture and the Mechanic Arts." The trustees were authorized 
to receive and hold donations, to select the professors and other officers 
of the college, to establish the conditions for admission, to lay out 
courses of study, to grant degrees, and to exercise other usual powers 
and privileges. 

The Governor and Council were given the right " to examine into the 
affairs of the college, and the doings of the trustees, and to inspect all 
their records and accounts, and the buildings and premises occupied by 
the college." 

It was provided that in addition to the studies especially required by 
the Act of Congress, the college should teach such other studies as its 
facilities would permit. 

The Legislature of 1897 changed the name of the institution to " The 
University of Maine." 

ENDOWMENT AND INCOME 

The State of Maine received, under the Act of Congress above 
referred to, two hundred and ten thousand acres of public land, from 
which the University has realized an endowment fund of $118,300. This 

17 



The University of Maine 

has been increased by a bequest of $100,000 from Abner Coburn of 
Skowhegan, who was for many years president of the Board of Trustees. 
The town of Orono contributed $8,000, and the town of Oldtown $3,000, 
for the purchase of the site on which the buildings stand. The State 
has appropriated about $350,000 for the material equipment. 

Under an Act of Congress approved March 2, 1887, the University 
receives $15,000 annually for the maintenance of the department known 
as the Agricultural Experiment Station. 

Under an Act of Congress approved August 30, 1890, the University 
receives $25,000 annually for its more complete endowment and main- 
tenance. 

Under an Act of the Legislature, approved March 20, 1897, the 
University receives $20,000 annually from the State for current expenses. 

Under an Act of the Legislature, approved March 8, 1905, the Univer- 
sity receives an additional appropriation of $12,000 for each of the two 
years, 1905 and 1906. Student fees and miscellaneous receipts com- 
plete the income. 

LOCATION 

The University has a beautiful and healthful location in the town of 
Orono, Penobscot county, half way between the villages of Orono and 
Stillwater, three miles from the city of Oldtown, and nine miles from 
the city of Bangor. The Stillwater river, a branch of the Penobscot, 
flows in front of the buildings, forming the western boundary of the 
campus. Orono is upon the Maine Central Railroad and is easy of access 
from all parts of the State. 

The Bangor, Orono, and Oldtown Electric Railroad runs through the 
University grounds. Visitors may find it convenient to take the electric 
cars at Bangor, Veazie, or Oldtown, as the electric road does not run 
to the railroad station at Orono. Baggage may be sent to Orono by the 
Maine Central Railroad. 

The College of Law is located in the Exchange Building, Bangor, at 
the corner of Exchange and State streets. 

THE BUILDINGS AND THEIR EQUIPMENTS 

Wingatf, Hall. — One of the most conspicuous buildings on the 
campus, Wingate Hall, named in honor of William P. Wingate of 
Bangor, long an honored member of the board of trustees, is a three- 
story brick structure, rectangular in form, with a handsome clock tower. 
It was erected for the departments of civil and mechanical engineering, 
but is at present occupied chiefly by the departments of civil engineering, 
mechanics and drawing, and physics. On the ground floor are four 
recitation rooms, instrument rooms, an optical room, and the offices of 
the professors of civil engineering, and mechanics and drawing. On the 

18 



The University of Maine 

second floor arc the offices and recitation rooms of the professors of 
physics. Greek, and Latin, the physical laboratories, and the physical 
apparatus rooms. On the third floor are two large, well lighted drawing 
rooms for use of the departments of civil engineering and mechanics 
and drawing, and a filing room containing a collection of blue prints 
belonging to the department of civil engineering. In the basement are 
the electrical laboratory of the department of physics, the photometer 
room, and the cement testing laboratory. On the fourth floor is another 
photometer room for the use of students in physics. 

Oak Hall. — North of Wingate Hall is Oak Hall, a substantial four~ 
story brick building used as a dormitory for men, named in honor of 
Lyndon Oak of Garland, for many years a useful member of the board 
of trustees. It contains forty-nine study rooms for students, and is 
supplied with bath rooms. It is heated by steam, supplied with water, 
and lighted by electricity. An annex added during the summer of 1903 
furnishes accommodations for thirty students more. 

Flrnald Hall. — This building, named in honor of Merritt C. Fernald, 
IX. D., president of the University from 1879 to ^93, is a two-story 
brick building, situated south of Wingate Hall. It contains fifteen rooms 
devoted to the departments of chemistry and pharmacy. On the first 
floor are the quantitative and pharmaceutical laboratories, with offices 
and private laboratories for the professors of chemistry and pharmacy; 
upon the second floor are lecture rooms, the qualitative laboratory, the 
office and private laboratory of the instructor in qualitative analysis, a 
store room and a recitation room. Under the roof are arranged the 
mineralcgical laboratory, and dark rooms. In the basement is an assay 
laboratory, a laboratory for water analysis, a room for organic prepara- 
tions, and store rooms. 

Coburn Hall. — Directly south of Fernald Hall is Coburn Hall, named 
in honor of Abner Coburn of Skowhegan, the chief benefactor of the 
University. It is a brick building, three stories in height. In the base- 
ment and on the first floor are located the reading room and the library, 
and two recitation rooms. On the second floor are the botanical and 
zoological laboratories, and recitation rooms for the departments of 
biology, English, and modern languages. Over the library is the 
museum. The collections are large and constantly increasing. On the 
third floor are recitation rooms for the departments of civics, philosophy, 
and modern languages, the modern language seminary room, and the 
psychological laboratory. 

19 



The University of Maine 

Alumni Haix.-To the northeast of Coburn Hall stands Alumni Hall 
erected in 1900. The front part contains on the ground floor the offices 
of the president, secretary, and cashier, a board room, two recitation 
rooms for the use of the military and mathematical departments, and the 
office of the professor of mathematics ; the second floor contains the 
university chapel with a large pipe organ in the choir gallery In the 
basement under the drill hall are the offices of the military instructor 
and the physical director, the baseball cage, lockers, lavatories, rooms 
for storage etc. The dimensions of the drill hall and gymnasium are 
100 by 62 feet. This room is encircled by a 9-foot running track sus- 
pended from the roof. As a gymnasium it is equipped with complete 
apparatus of the most approved kind. 

The Observatory.— The astronomical observatory stands upon a 
slight elevation to the east of Coburn Hall. The equatorial room is 
equipped with an eight-inch refractor of the best modern construction 
with finding circles, driving-clock, filar micrometer and other accessories' 
In the transit-room is a Repsold vertical circle of two-inch aperture' 
These instruments, together with sextants, sidereal chronometer etc' 
furnish excellent facilities for instruction in both descriptive and practical 
astronomy. 

Lord HAix.-The Legislature of 1903 appropriated the sum of $35 000 
for the construction and equipment of a new building for the departments 
of mechanical and electrical engineering. This building consists of a 
main part 82x56 feet in dimensions and two stories in height, and an ell 
125x42 feet partly of two stories and partly of one story. It contains 
three recitation rooms, a large drawing room, the shops, suitable labora- 
tories, and offices for the professors and instructors in the two depart- 
ments concerned. The mechanical laboratory contains a Riehle testing 
machine of 60,000 pounds capacity; an oil testing machine manufactured 
bylmms, Olsen & Co., of Philadelphia, and other oil testing apparatus- 
belt testing apparatus, steam separators, calorimeters, and injectors! 
The hydraulic laboratory in the basement contains steam pumps for test- 
ing, a pressure tank, and other apparatus for experimenting in the flow 
ot water m pipes, weir measurements, etc. The forge room is newly 
equipped with down draft forges, manufactured by the B. F. Sturtevant 
Co., of Boston. The dynamo laboratory is provided with six direct- 
current dynamos, two alternating-current dynamos, a rotary converter 
transformer, ammeters, voltmeters, wattmeters, rheostats, switches etc 
affording accommodations for fifteen students in a section. 

• H ° I,3V !f fff-~ Th{s is a two-story brick building, 81 x 48 feet, stand- 
ing south of Alumni Hall. The north wing contains the recitation rooms 

20 



The University of Maine 

for horticulture, agriculture, and biological chemistry, and the office of 
the professor of agriculture. The remainder of the building is occupied 
by the Maine Agricultural Experiment Station and is arranged as 
follows : 

On the ground floor are three large laboratories used in the analysis 
of foods, feeding stuffs, and fertilizers ; a reagent room ; the office of the 
chemists; and the office of the veterinarian. The general office and 
mailing room, the director's office, the laboratory for seed testing and 
photography, and the entomological laboratory are on the second floor. 

In the basement are rooms for the boiler, for the gas machine, for the 
grinding and preparation of samples, for the calorimeter, and a kitchen 
used in the experiments upon the food of man, and rooms for the stor- 
age of fuel, chemicals and glass ware. The large attic is used for the 
storage of samples and supplies. With the exception of the thermometers 
and rain gauge, the meteorological apparatus is in this building. The 
building is heated by steam, supplied with gas and electricity, and is 
thoroughly equipped with apparatus for the work of agricultural 
investigation. 

The Power House. — A w r ooden building, 30x56 feet, just north 
of Alumni Hall, contains two boilers, of one hundred and fifty, and dne 
hundred horse power, respectively, a fifty horse pow Y er Corliss engine, a 
fifteen horse power Otto gasoline engine, and the dynamos, which com- 
prise the lighting plant. Students in the Electrical Engineering Course 
receive instruction in the care and running of this equipment. 

The Horticultural Building. — The greenhouses, offices and labora- 
tories for horticultural work lie just east of Holmes Hall. The green- 
houses cover about 4000 square feet of surface, are heated with hot water, 
and furnish ample opportunity for the demonstration of the practical 
culture of flowers and vegetables under glass. In this building is an 
herbarium of economic plants, which is of increasing interest and value. 

The Dairy Building. — The Dairy Building, 50 x 42 feet, con- 
tains a milk room, a butter room, a cheese room, a cold storage room, a 
cheese curing room, a lecture room, the office of the professor of animal 
industry, and a laboratory. It is supplied with all necessary appliances 
for teaching the most approved methods of handling milk, cream, butter, 
and cheese. The building is heated with steam and supplied with hot 
and cold water. Power is furnished by a six horse power engine. 

The Farm Buildings. — The lower barn, 100x50 feet, contains a 
modern tie-up with 26 stalls, two grain rooms, two bull rooms, nursery, 
calf room, and silo, and has storage capacity for 150 tons of hay and 100 

21 



The University of Maine 

tons of silage. The upper barn, ioo x 40 feet, contains a class room for 
instruction in stock judging, stalls and pens for digestion experiments, 
rooms for grain and storage, scales for weighing animals, an electric 
motor for power and a mill for grinding. The barns are lighted by 
electricity and supplied with water and steam. The basements of the 
barns contain storage rooms for manure and roots, and pens for swine. 
The sheep barn, 125 x 20 feet, is of special design and contains six large 
pens, a nursery, and a storage room. The poultry plant consists of an 
incubator house, 31x31 feet, a warmed breeding house 150x15 feet, a 
curtain front house, 150x14 feet, and another, 120x16 feet. These 
houses accommodate 1,000 mature birds. There are also detached 
brooder houses capable of caring for 2,500 chicks. Two tool houses 
furnish about 10,000 square feet of floor room for the storage of wagons 
and farm machinery. 

The Mt. Vernon House. — This is a wooden building, completed in 
1898, to furnish dormitory accommodations for women. It is situated 
near the recitation and laboratory buildings, upon a site overlooking the 
campus and commanding a beautiful view of the river, villages, and 
mountains. It is two stories in height, built in the old colonial style, 
and consists of a long central portion and two wings. It contains a 
parlor, dining room, kitchen, bath room, and sixteen study rooms, each 
intended for two students. The rooms are large, well lighted, heated 
by a combined system of hot air and hot water, and provided with elec- 
tric lights. A special feature 'is the long hall on each floor, extending 
sixty-six feet upon the front of the building, and wide enough to serve 
as an assembly or study room. The building, and the students who live 
in it, are under the supervision of a competent matron. 

The Fraternity Houses. — Eight of the student fraternities occupy 
club houses. Six of the houses are on the campus, and two in the 
village of Orono. They are large, well arranged houses, affording rooms 
for about twenty-five students each. Several of the fraternities maintain 
their own boarding establishments under the supervision of matrons. 

The Art Museum. — The collection of casts, framed pictures, photo- 
graphs, and engravings belonging to the University Guild occupies 
quarters in a frame building a little northeast of Wingate Hall. Its main 
room for exhibition purposes measures 30 x 40 feet, and contains about 
three thousand reproductions of various works of art, chiefly of the 
renaissance period. 

Tin; Infirmary. — A small wooden building has recently been erected 
on the back campus, to be used in caring for any cases of infectious 

22 



The University of Maine 

disease that might appear among the students. It contains a ward for 
women, as well as one for men, with sanitary, comfortable, and con- 
venient equipment for possible patients. 

Other Buildings. — In addition to the buildings already described, 
there are several others devoted to various purposes. Among these are 
the President's house, the Commons or general boarding house, and three 
residences occupied by members of the faculty. 

The Athletic Field. — Alumni Field, so called because funds required 
for its construction were contributed by the Alumni Association, is 
located at the northwestern extremity of the campus, about 1,200 feet 
from the Gymnasium. It contains a quarter-mile cinder track, with a 
220 yard straightaway, and is graded and laid out for foot ball, base ball, 
and field athletics. 

THE LIBRARY 

The library is located in Coburn Hall. It contains twenty-nine thou- 
sand bound volumes and eight thousand pamphlets. Some fifteen hun- 
dred volumes of special value to the Experiment Station are kept in the 
Station building; and nearly three thousand law books, in the College of 
Law. Reference libraries are maintained in departmental rooms by 
those departments which require them. 

More than half the volumes in the library have been added within the 
last few years. Accessions average about 2,500 annually, and the greater 
part of these are acquired by purchase. In large part purchases are 
made of books selected by heads of departments, and this method results 
in a collection of great working value. 

The library is classified according to the Dewey system, slightly 
modified; there is a card catalogue, author and subject; access to the 
shelves is entirely unrestricted. Students may borrow three volumes at 
a time, to be retained three weeks, when they may be renewed unless 
previously called for ; special permissoin to borrow a larger number may 
be obtained, when necessary, upon application to the librarian ; there 
is a fine of two cents a day for books kept overtime. Officers and alumni 
of the University may borrow any reasonable number of volumes with- 
out time limit, except that all books must be returned at least nine days 
before Commencement, and the return of any volume may be required 
at any time by the library committee. Other responsible persons may 
obtain the privileges of the library upon application to the librarian. 
The librarian and his assistants are glad to give advice and assistance 
at any time. 

23 



The University of Maine 

' During the fall term of each year a series of three lectures is given by 
the librarian upon, The Library and Its Use, Classification and the 
Catalogue, and Reference Books and Their Use. Attendance upon these 
is required of freshmen, special students, and others in their first year 
at the University, with the purpose of giving them some idea of the 
opportunities the library offers them and suggestions that will aid them 
in its use. 

The librarian also offers an elective course in the spring term, on 
bibliography, the development of books and libraries, and the principles 
of library administration. This course consists of lectures, with collat- 
eral reference work, one hour a week, and may count for credit towards 
graduation. 

The library is a designated depository for the publications of the 
United States Congress, and also receives publications of different 
departments not included in the depository set. All the publications of 
the State of Maine are received. Through the courtesy of the late Hon. 
L. D. Carver, State Librarian, public documents of a number of other 
states are received, in accordance with a series of duplicate exchanges 
arranged by him. 

Over three hundred and fifty of the most important literary, scientific 
and technical periodicals, both American and foreign, are regularly 
received. The leading papers of Maine, together with a selected list of 
daily papers published in the large cities, are on file. 

The library is open daily from 8.00 A. M. to 12.00 M., and from 1.30 
to 5.30, and 7.00 to 9.30 P. M., Sundays and legal holidays excepted. 
On Sunday it is open from 2.00 to 5.00 P. M. 



MUSEUM OF NATURAL HISTORY 

The museum is located in the wing of Coburn Hall and in an adjoining 
room in the main part of the building and consists of geological, zoologi- 
cal, and botanical collections. 

The geological collections embrace the L. H. Merrill collection of 
illustrative rocks, a general collection of the more important fragmental, 
crystalline, and volcanic rocks, a collection of the more important build- 
ing stones, a general collection of the more common minerals, a collec- 
tion of economic minerals furnished by the National Museum, an 
educational series of rocks furnished by the U. S. Geological Survey, 
and a small collection of plant and animal fossils. 

The zoological collections comprise a number of the larger mammals 
of the State, a small set of exotic mammals, a more complete working 
collection of native birds, illustrative collections of the other groups of 
vertebrates, a rather large set of the shells of native and exotic molluscs, 

24 



The University of Maine 

and illustrative collections of the other groups, dry, alcoholic, and 
prepared as microscopic objects. 

The most important collection in the herbarium was presented to the 
University by Mr. Jonathan G. Clark of Bangor. This is the collection 
made by the late Rev. Joseph Blake, and includes more than 7000 species 
of both flowering and flowerless plants. It represents more especially 
the flora of Maine and other New England States, but includes many 
forms from the western United States, Mexico, and the West Indies, 
and a number from many of the European and Asiatic countries, and 
from Africa and Australia. 

The late Professor Harvey left to the herbarium the general collections 
accumulated during his connection with the University, and his special 
collection of the weeds and forage plants of Maine, comprising 300 
species. Other important collections are Collins's algae of the Maine 
coast, Halsted's lichens of New England, Halsted's weeds, Ellis and 
Everhard's North American Fungi, Cook's illustrative . Fungi, Under- 
wood's Hepaticse, Cummings and Semour's North American Lichens, 
and a collection of economic seeds prepared by the U. S. Department of 
Agriculture. 

ORGANIZATIONS 

Associations. — The following is a list of organizations existing 
in the University : Philological Club, Deutscher Verein, University Guild, 
Debating Society, Electrical and Mechanical Society, Civil Engineering 
Society, Agricultural Society, Honorary Society (Phi Kappa Phi), 
Young Men's Christian Association, Athletic Association, Glee Club, 
Instrumental Club, Band. 

The Philological Club. — The Philological Club meets on the first 
Monday evening of each month except January, during the academic 
year, for the presentation and discussion of original papers on philo- 
logical and literary subjects. 

The University Guild.— The University Guild has for its object the 
building up of an art collection, and the promotion of a general interest, 
among the faculty, students, and friends of the University, in the study 
of the fine arts. The Guild occupies the Art Museum and holds meetings 
occasionally during the year. As rapidly as funds permit, casts and 
photographs of celebrated works of art are being added to the collection 
already begun. 

The course in the history of Italian painting is open to members of the 
Guild. 

25 



The University of Maine 

Junior Electrical and Mechanical Society. — The Junior Elec- 
trical and Mechanical Society aims to unite the interests of the electrical 
and mechanical students and to keep its members in touch with the 
practical side of engineering. The society meets each week and topics 
of practical interest are explained' and discussed. All juniors in elec- 
trical or mechanical engineering are eligible to membership, and seniors 
are considered as honorary members. 

Phi Kappa Phi. — The Phi Kappa Phi is an honorary society. At the 
end of the fall term of the senior year the five members of the class 
having the highest standing are elected members, and at the end of the 
year the five next highest in the collegiate department, and two from the 
College of- Law, are added. 

The Young Men's Christian Association. — The Young Men's 
Christian Association, composed of students, has for its object the 
promotion of Christian fellowship and aggressive Christian work. 
Religious services are held in the Art Museum, and classes for the study 
of the Bible are conducted on Sunday. 

UNIVERSITY PUBLICATIONS 

The Annual Catalogue of the University op Maine.— This con- 
tains descriptions of the courses of study, lists of the trustees, faculty, 
and students, and other information relating to the University. 

The Annual Report of the Trustees, President, and Treasurer, 
to the Governor and Council of the State. — The report of the trustees 
and president includes an account of the general affairs and interests of 
the University for the year, and the report of the Experiment Station. 
The report for the odd years contains the biennial catalogue of graduates. 

The University of Maine Studies. — These are occasional publica- 
tions containing reports of investigations or researches made by 
university officers or alumni. The following have been issued : 

1. The Effect of Magnetization upon the Elasticity of Rods. 
J. S. Stevens. 

2. The Life History of the Nucula Delphinodonta (Mighels). 
G. A. Drew. 

3. A Preliminary List of Maine Fungi. P. L. Ricker. 

4. A Catalogue and Bibliography of the Odonata of Maine. 
F. L. Harvey. 

5. A Study of the Physiographic Ecology of Mount Ktaadn, Maine. 
L. H. Harvey. 

26 



The University of Maine 

The University Circulars. — These arc occasional pamphlets, issued 
for special purposes. Those now ready for distribution relate to : the 
Classical Course; the Courses in Agriculture; the Courses in Pharmacy; 
the College of Law; the Courses in Engineering; Student Expenses. 

The Maine Bulletin. — This is a publication issued monthly during 
the academic year, to give information to the alumni and the general 
public. 

The Annual Report of the Experiment Station. — This is Part II 
of the Annual Report of the University. 

The Experiment Station Bulletins. — These are popular accounts of 
the results of station work which relate directly to farm practice. 

The Maine Campus. — This is a journal published weekly during the 
academic year by an association of the students. 

The Prism. — This is an illustrated annual, published by the junior 
class. 

LECTURES 

A course of lectures is given in the University chapel each year. 
Admission is free to students in all departments. The following is the 
list for 1905-1906: 

November 10 Professor Edward S. Morse, Peabody Academy of 
Science. Subject: Japan and the Japanese. (Blackboard) 

November 24 Professor J. William Black, Colby College. Subject: 
Historic Spots in Virginia. (Stereopticon) 

December 14 Mr. Henry Turner Bailey, North Scituate, Mass. Sub- 
ject: Structural Design. (Stereopticon and Blackboard) 

January 18 Professor Henry L. Chapman, Bowdoin College. Subject: 
Robert Burns. 

February 1 Professor George D. Chase, University of Maine. Sub- 
ject: The Home of our Prehistoric Ancestors. 

February 23 Mrs. Anita Newcomb McGee, Washington, D. C. Sub- 
ject: A Woman's Experience in the Japanese Army. (Stereopticon) 

MILITARY INSTRUCTION 

Military instruction is required by law. The department is under the 
charge of an officer of the regular army, detailed by the President of the 
United States for this purpose. Cadet rifles, ammunition, and accoutre- 
ments are furnished by the War Department. The course has special 
reference to the duties of officers of the line. The students are organ- 

27 



The University of Maine 

ized into an infantry battalion of three companies, officered by cadets 
selected for character, soldierly bearing, and military efficiency. The 
corps is instructed and disciplined in accordance with rules established 
by the President of the United States.. These rules include the* minimum 
course of instruction that must be covered and the minimum time that 
must be devoted to this instructoin. 

The uniform prescribed by the board of trustees is as follows : 

For cadets, a dark blue blouse, cut military academy style, braided 
with black braid and without other ornament than -the word MAINE 
embroidered in gold on each side of the collar; light blue trousers with 
dark stripe and blue cap, old army pattern ; for commissioned offi- 
cers, the old regulation dress uniform prescribed for infantry officers 
of the United States Army; for non-commissioned officers, the same 
uniform as for privates, with the addition of gilt chevrons on arms of 
blouse. The total cost of uniforms is $14.35. The uniforms are pro- 
cured through an authorized tailor, and are made in the best manner of 
thoroughly good material. Cadets are required to wear the uniform 
when on military duty, and may wear the same at other times. 

The three seniors who attain the highest standing in the military 
department are reported to the military secretary to the U. S. Army, and 
their names are printed in the U. S. Army Register. Cadets who have 
satisfactorily completed the course in military science receive at gradua- 
tion a certificate of military proficiency and are reported to the Adjutant 
General of Maine. 

Service in the military department is elective and required as follows 
(this does not apply to the College of Law and the School Course in 
Agriculture) : 

All students physically qualified are required to take one year's military 
work during their first year at the University, except that those admitted 
to advanced standing may elect other work equal to one credit. One 
credit is allowed for this work. Those physically disqualified are 
required to elect other work equal to one credit in lieu of military work. 
Graduation requirements include one year's military work, or a substi- 
tute under the above conditions. No fractional credit for military work 
will count towards graduation. Military instruction is arranged in a 
four years' course. 

The grades and relative rank of officers and non-commissioned officers 
will be determined by the professor, subject to the approval of the 
president. 

PHYSICAL TRAINING 

The gymnasium affords excellent opportunities for physical training 
and in-door athletics. 

28 



The University of Maine 

On the first floor are the baseball cage, lockers, baths, and toilet rooms 
for the accommodation of three hundred and seventy-five students, with 
space to enlarge these accommodations when necessary. 

The gymnasium proper is on the second floor, which has a floor space 
of 6,550 square feet, with a running track overhead. This main room 
of the gymnasium is equipped with a large variety of light and heavy 
gymnastic apparatus and many of the best patterns of modern developing 
appliances. 

From December 1st to April 1st gymnasium work, consisting of drills 
with Indian clubs, dumb-bells, wands, and bar-bells, also exercises on the 
heavy apparatus, and gymnasium games, is elective. 

PUBLIC WORSHIP 

Religious services of a simple character are held in the chapel every 
day except Saturday and Sunday. All undergraduate students are 
required to be present. Students receive a cordial welcome at all services 
in the churches of the village. Voluntary religious services, under the 
direction of the Young Men's Christian Association, are held weekly. 

GENERAL REGULATIONS 

The regulations in regard to the selection of studies, standings and 
grades, absences from recitations and examinations, entrance conditions, 
leave of absence, attendance upon chapel, penalties, examinations, and 
athletics, are printed in a small pamphlet, which may be obtained from 
the secretary. 

By these regulations, the quota of regular studies for each student 
varies from a minimum of fifteen hours, to a maximum of twenty hours 
of class room work each week. In the application of this rule, two hours 
of laboratory work, or of other exercises not requiring preparation, count 
as one hour. 

Excuses for absence from individual exercises are not required. Each 
student is expected to be present at all recitations and other exercises 
except when imperative reasons require absence. Of these reasons he is 
the judge; but a student who is absent from ten per cent, or more of the 
exercises in any study is not admitted to the final examination. A 
student who fails to pass at an examination, is absent from an examina- 
tion, or is excluded from an examination, may make up his deficiency 
at the special examinations held at the times noted in the calendar. The 
arrearage examinations during the Christinas recess include only studies 
of the spring term; the examinations during the Easter recess include 
only studies of the fall term ; the examinations at the beginning of the 
fall term include all the studies of the year. A student who fails to 
make up an arrearage before the study is again taken in class is required 

29 



The University of Maine 

to attend recitations in that study, or make up the work under a tutor 
selected by the faculty. 

Each student is given a report of his work shortly after the close of 
each term. Parents or guardians may obtain these reports upon applica- 
tion to the secretary. 



SCHOLARSHIP HONORS 

Honors for scholarships are of two kinds, general and special. 
General honors are awarded, at graduation, to students that attain an 
average standing, after the freshman year, of ninety on a scale of one 
hundred. Special honors are granted for the satisfactory completion of 
an honor course in addition to the work required for a degree in one year. 
An honor course must involve at least ninety recitations or an equivalent. 
The methods of work are determined by the instructor, who should be 
consulted in each case by students desiring to take such a course. Honor 
courses are open to juniors and seniors that have attained an average 
standing of eighty per cent, in all previous work, and an average stand- 
ing of ninety per cent, in all previous work of the department in which 
the honors are sought. A student cannot register for an honor course 
without the consent of the faculty, nor later than the fourth week of the 
fall term. Upon the completion of a course, the student's work will be 
tested by an examination or thesis, or both, under the direction of the 
faculty committee on honors, and the result, together with the 
instructor's report, will be laid before the faculty. Examinations for 
honors shall be held at such times and places as the committee on honors 
may appoint. They shall be distinct from any class examinations in the 
same course, which latter examinations the candidate for honors may or 
may not take, as he chooses. The honor examination shall be written 
and, at the discretion of the committee, also oral. The professors giving 
the courses shall submit to the committee papers for the honor examina- 
tions not later than one week before the date set for the examinations. 

The students in honor courses involving laboratory or drawing-room 
work may be tested by examination or thesis or both, at the discretion 
of the committee. The note books kept in such work shall be submitted 
to the committee and may take the place of a thesis in case they show 
practically the whole work of the course. The faculty may grant special 
honors to those students who receive the approval of the committee, but 
will not do so if the general work is unsatisfactory. Honors, and their 
nature, arc stated upon the Commencement program and published in 
the annual catalogue. 

The first 15 of the class in rank are authorized to prepare commence- 
ment parts; these parts must be submitted to a committee by the close 

30 



The University of Maine 

of the Easter recess, and from the parts submitted, a certain number are 
selected by the committee. These parts must be prepared for delivery 
to the satisfaction of a representative of the faculty. 

DEGREES 

Bachelor's Degrees 

The degree of Bachelor of Arts (B. A.) is conferred upon students 
that complete a Classical Course. 

The degree of Bachelor of Science (B. S.) is conferred upon students 
that complete the Chemical, Agricultural, Civil Engineering, 
Mechanical Engineering, Electrical Engineering, Mining Engineering, 
Forestry, or Pharmacy Course ; or that have completed a general course 
with major work in some one department. The diploma indicates which 
course has been completed. 

The degree of Pharmaceutical Chemistry (Ph. C.) is conferred upon 
students that complete the Short Pharmacy Course. 

The degree of Bachelor of Laws (LL. B.) is conferred upon students 
that complete the Law Course. 

In order to receive degrees at Commencement, candidates must have 
completed by the close of the Easter recess, at least seven-eighths of all 
the work required for graduation. 

In case of failure to pass in any spring term study, only one special 
examination shall be given before Commencement, and this shall not 
be later than the Friday preceding Commencement. 

Theses required from candidates for the degree of B. S., must be 
completed to the satisfaction of the major instructor and deposited in 
the library, accompanied by the binding fee, not later than twelve o'clock 
(noon), nine days preceding Commencement. 

Candidates for degrees who fail to meet these requirements will not 
be awarded their degrees, and their names will not appear on the 
Commencement programme. 

Advanced Degrees 

For receiving an advanced degree the required preparation must 
include the attainment of the proper first degree. 

The Master's degrees, viz., Master of Arts (M. A.), Master of Science 
(M. S.), and Master of Laws (LL. M.), are conferred upon holders of 
the corresponding Bachelor's degrees under either of the following 
conditions : 

(i) One year's work in residence, of a minimum amount equal to not 
less than six credits (see p. 43), including examinations on a prescribed 
course of study in a major subject and not more than two minor subjects, 

31 



The University of Maine 

and the presentation of a satisfactory thesis. In special cases all the 
work may be done in one department. The course for each candidate 
must be approved by the committee on advanced degrees not later than 
the first week in October. A registration fee of $5.00 is charged, and an 
additional fee of $15.00 for examinations and diploma is payable upon 
the completion of the work. Theses must be submitted not later than 
May 20. They shall be printed or typewritten, unless the subject matter 
prevents, on paper of good quality, 8 inches by 10V2 inches, with not 
less than one inch margin on inner edge and half-inch margin on outer 
edges. They shall be bound in black leather with title on first cover. 
Drawings accompanying a thesis may be folded and bound with the 
thesis, or placed in a pocket on the third page of the cover ; or, if too 
many for this, they may be boir.id separately in size to suit the drawings. 
The major instructor, on application, will furnish detailed information 
concerning the form of theses. Candidates are expected to be present in 
person to receive their degrees. 

(2) Two years' work in absence, with examinations at the Univer- 
sity, the other conditions as in (1). 

The professional degrees of Civil Engineer (C. E.), Mechanical Engi- 
neer (M. E.), and Electrical Engineer (E. E.), may be conferred upon 
graduates of the Civil Engineering, Mechanical Engineering, and Elec- 
trical Engineering Courses respectively, upon the presentation of a satis- 
factory thesis after at least three years of professional work subsequent 
to graduation. A fee of $10.00 is required, payable upon presentation 
of the thesis, which must be submitted not later than May 20. Candi- 
dates are expected to be present in person to receive their degrees. 



STUDENT EXPENSES 

Many students go through college with an annual expenditure of little 
more than $200, exclusive of the expense of clothing, traveling, and vaca- 
tion, and very many earn a part of this sum by vacation work. An 
estimate of the necessary annual expenses of a student in any depart- 
ment, except the College of Law, may be made from the following table. 
For the expenses of students in the College of Law reference is made to 
the article on that College. It should be noticed that clothing, traveling, 
vacation, society, and personal expenses are not included in the table. 
These vary according to individual tastes and habits. The table is made 
up for men students who room if, Oak Hall and board at the Commons. 
The necessary expenses of other students are sometimes lower, but 
usually slightly higher. In all cases an allowance must be made for 
personal incidental expenses. 

32 



The University of Maine 



Annual Student Expenses 

Tuition, 2 terms at $15.00, $30.00 or $40 00 

Registration fee, 2 terms at $5.00, 10 00 

Incidentals, 2 terms at $10.00, 20 00 

Laboratory fees, (average) about, 10 00 

Text-books, about, 15 00 

Board, 36 weeks at $3 . 00, 108 00 

Heat and light for half room, and general care of dormi- 
tory 27 00 

Total, $220.00 or 230 00 

The tuition charge is $15.00 a term, or $30,000 a year, and all students 
are subject to this charge except those in the courses in agriculture, for 
none of which is any tuition charge made, but incidental and registration 
fees are the same as in other courses. Residents of Maine who need 
assistance and maintain a good record may obtain, from the University, 
loans to cover the tuition charge. The regulations in regard to these 
loans are stated on page 34. 

Students that are not residents of the State of Maine are charged an 
annual tuition of $40.00. 

The registration fee of $5.00 must be paid at the beginning of each 
term before the student enters any classes. 

The incidental fee is $10.00 a term, or $20.00 a year, and covers heat 
and light for public buildings, reading-room charges, care of public 
rooms, and miscellaneous expenses. 

A student obliged to leave the University within two weeks after the 
beginning of the term may have the foregoing amounts refunded with 
the exception of the registration fee. A student leaving within the first 
half of the term receives a rebate of one-half the incidental expenses. 
No other rebate is made. 

The cost of text-books will average about $15.00 a year for the course. 
These may be bought at the college store. The expense may be decreased 
by buying second-hand books and selling them after using them. 

Students in the laboratories and shops pay certain charges to cover 
the cost of materials and maintenance. These charges are as follows : — 
chemistry, per term, about $3.00; bacteriology, per course, $3.00; 
physics, per course, $2.00 to $4.00; pharmacy, per term, about $3.50; 
mineralogy, $2.00; biology, per course, $1.00 to $3.00; electrical 
engineering, per course, $2.50; mechanical engineering, per course, 
$2.00; shop, per course, $4.00 to $5.00. Laboratory charges in the civil 
engineering course are very few, but traveling expenses incurred in 

33 



The University of Maine 

visiting engineering works will be nearly equivalent to the laboratory 
expenses of other courses. 

The largest item of expense is for board. At the Commons, the 
university boarding house, the price is about $3.00 a week. Board may 
be obtained in clubs or private families at prices ranging from $2.50 to 
$3.50 a week. 

The charges for rooms in Oak Hall are seventy-five cents a week for 
each student, when two occupy a room. This pays for heat and light, 
and for the lighting and care of the halls and public rooms of the dormi- 
tory. Students supply their own furniture. Furnished rooms, with light 
and heat, may be obtained in the village for $1.50 a week if occupied 
by one person, or $2.00 a week if occupied by two persons. 

Women students that do not live at their own homes are required to 
room and board at the Mt. Vernon House. The price of board is $3.00 
a week. For heat and light, and for the care of the public rooms, the 
charge is seventy-five cents a week. 

Each student is required to deposit with the treasurer a bond, with 
two good names as sureties, in the amount of $150.00, to cover term 
bills. Blanks on which bonds should be made out will be furnished by 
the secretary upon application. Those who keep a sufficient deposit with 
the treasurer to cover the bills of one term will not be required to 
furnish a bond. The deposit required is $90.00 from those who board 
at the Commons, or Mt. Vernon House, and $30.00 from others. This 
deposit is in addition to the registration fee. No student will be 
graduated who is in debt to the treasury. 

A circular containing a fuller statement in regard to expenses, and 
treating of the opportunities for self-help, may be obtained upon appli- 
cation. 

LOANS 

Tuition Loans 

Residents of Maine that need assistance and maintain a satisfactory 
record may borrow from the university treasury a sum sufficient to pay 
the tuition charge. This privilege is not extended to students in the 
College of Law. 

Borrowers are required to give notes with satisfactory endorsement. 
The loans bear interest at six per cent, per annum, and are due $30.00 
a year, beginning with the first year after graduation, but may be paid 
earlier. No member of the faculty is accepted as an endorser. 

Loans are granted by a committee consisting of the president and two 
other members of the faculty. The number of loans may not exceed 
one-third of the number of students in the undergraduate departments. 
Loans are granted to cover the tuition charges of one year at a time. 

34 



The University of Maine 

The first grant of loans for each university year is made in the pre- 
ceding June. Applications for loans are considered during May, and to 
insure attention at this time should be forwarded to the President not 
later than May 15. A second award is made in the fall term. Applica- 
tions should be made not later than October 10. They must be made to 
the President upon blanks to be obtained from the Secretary of the 
faculty. Awards made in June may be withdrawn from students that 
do not register, or claim their loans, by October 10. 

The Kittredge Loan Fund 
This fund, amounting to nearly one thousand dollars, was established 
by Nehemiah Kittredge, of Bangor. It is in the control of the president 
and treasurer of the University, by whom it is loaned to needy students. 
In the deed of gift it was prescribed that no security but personal notes 
bearing interest at the prevailing rate should be required. Loans are made 
on the conditions that the interest shall be paid promptly, and that the 
principal shall be returned from the first earnings after graduation. 

SCHOLARSHIPS AND PRIZES 

The Kidder Scholarship, thirty dollars, was endowed by Frank E. 
Kidder, Ph. D., Denver, Colorado, a graduate of the University in the 
class of 1879, to be awarded to a member of the junior class to be 
selected by the President and the faculty. 

The Western Alumni Association Scholarship, tuition for the 
sophomore year, founded by that association, will be awarded to that 
student taking a regular course, whose deportment is satisfactory, and 
who shall make the best progress in all studies during his freshman year. 

The Junior Exhibition Prize, fifteen dollars, will be awarded to that 
member of the junior class who shall present the best oration at the 
junior exhibition. In the award of this prize both the composition and 
the delivery of the oration will be considered. 

The Sophomore Declamation Prize, fifteen dollars, for excellence 
in elocution, will be awarded to the best speaker in the sophomore class. 

The Walter Balentine Prize, fifteen dollars, the gift of Whitman H. 
Jordan, Sc. D., Geneva, N. Y., a graduate of the University in the class 
of 1875, will be awarded to that member of the junior class who shall 
excel in biological chemistry. 

The Kennebec County Prize, the gift of Hon. William T. Haines, 
Waterville, a graduate of the University in the class of 1876, will be 
awarded to that member of the senior class who shall write the best 
essay on applied electricity. 

The Franklin Danforth Prize, ten dollars, the gift of the Hon. 
Edward F. Danforth, Skowhegan, a graduate of the University in the 

35 



The University of Maine 

class of 1877, in memory of his father, Franklin Danforth, will be 
awarded to that member of the senior class in the agricultural course 
who shall attain the highest standing. 

The Pharmacy Prize will be awarded to that student in the Phar- 
macy Department who shall attain the highest standing in chemistry in 
the last year of his course. 

The Holt Prizes, the gift of Erastus Eugene Holt, A. M., M. D., 
LL. D., of Portland, will be given to the three students of the class of 
1908, who show the greatest improvement in their rating. The rating 
will be determined from deductions made from the gymnasium and class 
records of the students at the beginning and end of their college course 
by the mathematical formula for the normal earning ability of the body, 
devised by Dr. Holt. 

The Boston Alumni Association Scholarship, thirty dollars, will 
be awarded to that member of the junior class who shall make the most 
satisfactory progress in all studies during the junior year, and whose 
deportment is satisfactory, and who shall need financial assistance. 

The New York Alumni Association Scholarship, thirty dollars, 
will be awarded upon conditions to be determined by the board of 
trustees. In 1905 it was awarded to the student who excelled in debate. 

The Pittsburg Alumni Association Scholarship, founded by that 
association, tuition for one year, upon conditions to be determined by 
the President of the University. 



ADMISSION 

General Requirements.— Applicants for admission must pass the 
required examinations, or present satisfactory certificates of fitness, and 
file with the Treasurer a bond for $150 signed by two bondsmen, as 
security for the payment of term bills. A cash deposit covering the bills 
of one term will be accepted in place of a bond. In the College of Law 
the fees must be paid in advance, and no bond or deposit is required. 
The University admits men and women, both residents of Maine and 
non-residents. 

Admission to Advanced Standing. — Candidates for advanced stand- 
ing are examined in the preparatory studies, and in those previously 
pursued by the classes they propose to enter, or in other equivalent 
studies; a rank of 80% must be attained before passing any course in 
advance. Certificates from approved schools are accepted for the pre- 
paratory work; but certificates are not accepted for any part of the 
college work, unless such work has been done in a college. College 
graduates who wish to enter a technical course are admitted to the junior 
class without examination. 

36 



The University of Maine 

Special Recommendations. — A good preparation in algebra and geom- 
etry is most important for those who expect to enter engineering courses. 
The schools should give a part of the work in algebra and geometry, or 
a review of these subjects, during the last year. 

Students preparing for the classical subjects should devote special 
attention to Latin composition, Roman history, and constant practice in 
pronouncing Latin according to the Roman method. 

Preliminary Examinations. — A candidate who wishes to be exam- 
ined on part of his work in advance of the year in which he proposes to 
enter the University may receive credit for such examination, provided 
he has completed not less than one-half of his preparatory work. It is 
urged that candidates avail themselves of this privilege so far as possible. 

Special Students. — Persons not candidates for a degree, who wish 



The Maine Dairy Association offers three prizes to students in the 
school course in agriculture, for the best essays on subjects pertaining to 
dairying. The prizes are $15.00, $10.00, and $5.00. 

Mr. L. C. Bateman of the Lewiston Journal offers a prize of $10.00 
for the best essay on stable sanitation, by any student in any agricultural 
course. 

Mr. H. E. Cook of Denmark, N. Y., and Mr. George Aiken of Wood- 
stock, Vermont, each offer $5.00, the method of award to be determined 
later. 

Honorable Z. A. Gilbert of North Green, Maine, agricultural editor of 
the Maine Farmer, offers a prize of $25.00 for agricultural students, the 
conditions to be announced later. 

Honorable A. W. Gilman, Commissioner of Agriculture in Maine, 
offers a prize of $25.00 for agricultural students, to be awarded by action 
of the faculty. 



.T\.yjJllCcllHjn;> 1<J1 SULU CAdiniliauunB UILWL UV- mam, \jlil uu uimnvj uw i^v, 

obtained from the Secretary of the faculty. The examinations given by 
the College Entrance Examination Board will be accepted in place of 
the above. 

Admission by Certificate 
Certificates for admission to the freshman class without examination 
are accepted only from graduates of schools approved by the New 
England College Entrance Certificate Board (except in the case of 
schools outside of New England). They will not be accepted from non- 
37 



The University of Maine 

class of 1877, in memory of bis father, Franklin Danforth, will be 
awarded to that member of the senior class in the agricultural course 
who shall attain the highest standing. 

The Pharmacy Prize will be awarded to that student in the Phar- 
macy Department who shall attain the highest standing in chemistry in 
the last year of his course. 

The Holt Prizes, the gift of Erastus Eugene Holt, A. M., M. D., 
LL. D., of Portland, will be given to the three students of the class of 
1908, who show the greatest improvement in their rating. The rating 
will be determined from deductions made from the gymnasium and class 
records of the students at the beginning and end of their college course 
by the mathematical formula for the normal earning ability of the body, 

/WJspH hv Tlr Hnlt 



Admission to Advanced Standing.— Candidates for advanced stand- 
ing are examined in the preparatory studies, and in those previously 
pursued by the classes they propose to enter, or in other equivalent 
studies; a rank of 80% must be attained before passing any course in 
advance. Certificates from approved schools are accepted for the pre- 
paratory work; but certificates are not accepted for any part of the 
college work, unless such work has been done in a college. College 
graduates who wish to enter a technical course are admitted to the junior 
class without examination. 

36 



The University of Maine 

Special Recommendations. — A good preparation in algebra and geom- 
etry is most important for those who expect to enter engineering courses. 
The schools should give a part of the work in algebra and geometry, or 
a review of these subjects, during the last year. 

Students preparing for the classical subjects should devote special 
attention to Latin composition, Roman history, and constant practice in 
pronouncing Latin according to the Roman method. 

Preliminary Examinations. — A candidate who wishes to be exam- 
ined on part of his work in advance of the year in which he proposes to 
enter the University may receive credit for such examination, provided 
he has completed not less than one-half of his preparatory work. It is 
urged that candidates avail themselves of this privilege so far as possible. 

Special Students. — Persons not candidates for a degree, who wish 
to take special studies, may be permitted to do so, if upon examination 
they give satisfactory evidence that they are prepared to take the desired 
studies. If they subsequently desire to become candidates for a degree, 
or to take a regular course, they will be required to pass the other 
entrance examinations. This privilege is intended for students of 
unusual maturity or previous advancement in particular subjects, not for 
those who are incompetent to pursue a regular course. 

No examinations are required for admission to the special and exten- 
sion courses in agriculture. 

For admission to the College of Law, see page 128. 

Admission by Examinations 
Entrance examinations are held at Orono, beginning two days before 
the opening of the fall term, and on the Thursday, Friday, and Saturday 
preceding Commencement. To save expenses to candidates, examina- 
tion papers will be sent to any satisfactory person who will consent to 
conduct examinations on the days appointed in June. Papers will not 
be sent at any other time. The questions are to be submitted under the 
usual restrictions of a written examination, and the answers returned 
to the University accompanied by the endorsement of the examiner. 
Applications for such examinations must be made out on blanks to be 
obtained from the Secretary of the faculty. The examinations given by 
the College Entrance Examination Board will be accepted in place of 
the above. 

Admission by Certificate 
Certificates for admission to the freshman class without examination 
are accepted only from graduates of schools approved by the New 
England College Entrance Certificate Board (except in the case of 
schools outside of New England). They will not be accepted from non- 
37 



The University of Maine 

graduates except in extraordinary cases, and then only provided the 
candidate is expressly recommended for admission by the principal of the 
school from which he comes. Certificates must be made out on blanks 
furnished by the University. 

Certificates from schools approved by the above-mentioned Board will 
be accepted at any of the institutions co-operating to maintain it. Any 
superintendent or principal desiring to have a school under his charge 
placed upon the approved list should apply before April ist to the secre- 
tary of the board, Professor Nathaniel F. Davis, 159 Brown St., Provi- 
dence, R. I. 

ENTRANCE REQUIREMENTS 

The requirements for admission are those adopted by the Maine Asso- 
ciation of Colleges and Preparatory Schools: 

To gain admission into any of the courses leading to the degrees 
of B. A. or B. S., 26 points must be offered by the candidate, accord- 
ing to the following schedules (to count 2 points, a subject must be 
pursued for one school year, with five recitation periods a week) : 

For the B. A. Courses 
Required Subjects 

College Entrance English counts 4 points 

Latin " 8 

Algebra " 4 

Plane Geometry " 2 " 

Roman History " 1 point 

19 
Optional Subjects (7 Points to be Chosen) 
(If Greek is not taken, French or German must be; and if Greek is 
taken, Greek History must be taken also. Not less than 4 points of any 
modern language will be accepted.) 

Each year of Greek counts 2 points 

" " French " 2 

" " German " 2 

Chemistry (including notebook) " 2 

Physics (including notebook) " 2 " 

Solid Geometry " 1 point 

Greek History " 1 

English " "1 

American History and Civil Government " 1 " 

38 



The University of Maine 

For the B. S. Courses 
Required Subjects 

College Entrance English counts 4 points 

Algebra " 4 " 

Plane Geometry " 2 " 

Solid Geometry (engineering courses) 1 point 

11 

Optional Subjects (15 Points to be Chosen) 
(Of these, two years of one modern language, one year of science, 
and one year of history must be taken. Not less than 4 points of any 
modern language will be accepted). 

Each year of French counts 2 points 

" " " German " 2 " 

" " " Latin " 2 

" " Greek " 2 

Advanced Mathematics (higher Algebra and 

Plane and Spherical Trigonometry) " 2 " 

Mechanical Drawing (for technical courses) 1 point 

Manual Training (for technical courses) " 1 " 

Chemistry (including note book) counts 2 points 

Physics (including note book) " 2 " 

Physiography " 1 point 

Physiology " 1 " 

Roman History " 1 " 

Greek History " 1 

English History " 1 " 

American History and Civil Government " 1 " 

Candidates for the Short Course in Pharmacy (two years) are 
examined on — Elementary Subjects, Descriptive Geography, Arithmetic, 
English Grammar, Physiology; History, United States; Mathematics, 
Algebra through simple equations of the first degree. 

For the requirements for admission to the College of Law, see the 
article on the College of Law, page 128. 

REQUIREMENTS IN DETAIL 

The following statements will show in detail the requirements in each 
subject. 

Language 

English. — Inasmuch as the examination in English is designed quite 
as much to test the candidate's ability to express himself well in his 

39 



The University of Maine 

mother tongue as to test his knowledge of the books prescribed, he is 
urgently advised to pursue a thorough course in English composition, in 
which at least a part of the subjects written upon are from his own 
observation and experience. He is further urged to cultivate, in all his 
writing, habits of correctness in spelling, grammar, sentence structure, 
punctuation, and paragraphing. The examiner will regard mere knowl- 
edge of the books as less important than the ability to write good English. 

Grammar. The usual school course. 

Reading and Practice. The candidate is expected to read intelligently 
all the books prescribed. He should read them as he reads other books ; 
he is expected to have only a general knowledge of their substance, but 
to have freshly in mind their most important parts. To test his knowl- 
edge and his power of clear and accurate expression, he will be required 
to write one or two paragraphs on each of several topics set before him 
on the examination paper. In place of this test the candidate may 
present an exercise book, certified by his instructor, containing compo- 
sitions or other written work done in connection with the reading of 
the books. 

In 1905 this part of the examination will be based upon : Shakespeare's 
Merchant of Venice and Julius Caesar ; the Sir Roger de Coverley 
Papers in The Spectator ; Goldsmith's Vicar of Wakefield ; Coleridge's 
Ancient Mariner ; Scott's Ivanhoe ; Carlyle's Essay on Burns ; Tenny- 
son's Princess ; Lowell's Vision of Sir Launfal ; George Eliot's Silas 
Maimer. 

In 1906, 1907, and 1908 it will be based upon : Shakespeare's Macbeth 
and The Merchant of Venice ; The Sir Roger de Coverley Papers in 
The Spectator ; Irving's Life of Goldsmith ; Coleridge's The Ancient 
Mariner ; Scott's Ivanhoe and The Lady of the Lake ; Tennyson's 
Gareth and Lynette, Lancelot and Elaine, and The Passing of Arthur ; 
Lowell's The Vision of Sir Launfal; George Eliot's Silas Marner. 

Study and Practice. This part of the examination presupposes a care- 
ful study of the works named below. The examination will be upon 
subject-matter, form, and structure; and will also test the candidate's 
ability to express his knowledge with clearness and accuracy. 

In 1905 it will be based upon : Shakespeare's Macbeth ; Milton's 
Lycidas. Comus, L'Allegro. and II Penseroso ; Burke's Speech on Con- 
ciliation with America; Macaulay's Essays on Milton and on Addison. 

In 1906, 1907, and 1908 it will based upon : Shakespeare's Julius 
Caesar; Milton's L'Allegro, II Penseroso, Comus, and Lycidas; Burke's 
Speech on Conciliation with America ; Macaulay's Essay on Milton, and 
Life of Johnson. 

French. — First Year. Pronunciation ; rudiments of grammar, includ- 
ing inflection of the regular and irregular verbs, plural of nouns, inflection 

40 



The University of Maine 

of adjectives, participles and pronouns, use of personal pronouns, common 
adverbs, prepositions, and conjunctions, word order, and elementary 
syntax; abundant easy exercises; 100-175 pages of graduated texts; 
practice in translating into French variations of sentences read ; dicta- 
tion, and reproduction from memory of sentences from text. Super's, 
or Whitney's Reader is recommended. 

Second Year. 250-400 pages of easy modern prose; constant practice 
in translation of easy variations of the text into French ; abstracts of 
the text ; continuation of grammar ; dictation. 

The following texts are recommended: (1) Perrault's Contes de 
Fees, or Daudet's Easier Short Stories ; (2) Erckmann-Chatrian's Mme. 
Therese or Conscrit de 1813, or About's Roi des Montagnes, or 
Merimee's Colomba ; (3) Labiche's Voyage de M. Perrichon, or 
Labiche et Martin's La Poudre aux Yeux. 

Third Year. (See p. 49.) 400-600 pages of ordinary difficulty; con- 
stant practice in French paraphrases, abstracts, reproductions from 
memory ; study of grammar of moderate completeness ; dictation. 

The following texts are recommended: (1) Sandeau's Mile, de la 
Seigliere, or Augier et Sandeau's Le Gendre de M. Poirier; (2) 
Corneille's Le Cid or Horace; (3) Racine's Athalie or Andromaque; 
(4) Moliere's L'Avare or Le Bourgeois Gentilhomme ; (5) Hugo's 
Hernani, or Coppee's Poems. 

German. — First Year. Pronunciation : memorizing and frequent 
repetition of easy colloquial sentences ; grammar : article, commonly 
used nouns, adjectives, pronouns, weak verbs and more used strong 
verbs, more common prepositions, simpler uses of modal auxiliaries, 
elementary rules of syntax and word-order ; abundant easy exercises in 
composition; 75-100 pages of graduated texts from a reader; constant 
practice in translating into German easy variations of text, and reproduc- 
tion from memory of sentences from text. 

Second Year. Continued drill on rudiments of grammar; 150-200 
pages of easy stories and plays ; continued translation into German of 
easy variations on matter read and off-hand reproduction, orally and in 
writing. 

The following texts are recommended: (1) Andersen's Marchen or 
Bilderbuch, or Leander's Traumereien, about forty pages ; (2) Hauff's 
Das Kalte Herz, or Zschockke's Der Zerbrochene Krug; (3) Hillern's 
Hoher als die Kirche, or Storm's Immensee; (4) a short story from 
Heyse or Baumbach or Seidl ; (5) Benedix' Der Prozess. 

Third Year. — (See below.) Grammar; less usual strong verbs, use 
of articles, cases, auxiliaries, tenses and moods (particularly the infinitive 
and subjunctive), word-order and word-formation; about 400 pages of 

41 



The University of Maine 

moderately difficult prose and poetry ; constant practice in paraphrases, 
abstracts and memory reproductions of passages read. 

The following texts are recommended: (i) One of Riehl's Novelettes; 
(2) a part of Freytag's Bilder aus der Deutschen Vergangenheit ; (3) 
a part of Fouque's Undine, or a part of Schiller's Geisterseher ; (4) a 
short course in Lyrics and Ballads; (5) one classical play by Goethe, or 
Schiller, or Lessing. 

Candidates may present themselves for an examination in French or 
German based upon the Third Year Courses outlined above and upon 
obtaining a rank of 80% will be allowed to pursue advanced work in 
college. But this examination in the Third Year Course will not be 
received in lieu of any required examination for admission, or of work 
required for a certificate. 

Latin. — The grammar, including prosody; Caesar's Gallic War, books 
I-IV; Cicero's four orations against Catiline, and those for Archias and 
for the Manilian Law; Vergil's Eclogues and the JEneid, books I-VI ; 
the sight translation of Latin passages of moderate difficulty ; the trans- 
lation into Latin of simple English sentences, and of easy narrative 
passages based on the prose authors read. For the last a vocabulary of 
of unusual words will be furnished. Equivalent readings will be accepted, 
for those prescribed. 

Greek. — The grammar, including prosody ; Xenophon's Anabasis, 
books I-IV; Homer's Iliad, books I-III ; the sight translation of easy 
passages from Xenophon ; the translation into Greek of easy passages- 
based on the required books of the Anabasis. For the last a vocabulary 
of unusual words will be furnished. Equivalent reading will be accepted. 

History 

Greek History. — History of Greece, to the capture of Corinth, 146 
B. C. Myer, Morey, or Botsford. 

Roman History. — A knowledge of Roman history, down to the death 
of Marcus Aurelius, such as may be obtained from Allen's Short History 
of the Roman People, or from Myers's Rome : Its Rise and Fall, or 
from Morey 's Outlines of Roman History. 

English History. — A knowledge such as may be obtained from Mont- 
gomery, Connor and Kendall, Terry, or Chayney's History of England. 

United States History. — A knowledge such as may be obtained from 
Fiske, Hart, Montgomery, or McLaughlin's History of the United 
States. 

Mathematics 

Algebra. — The elements, equations of the first degree, radicals, the 
theory of exponents, quadratic equations, ratio and proportion, arith- 
metical and geometrical progression, the binomial theorem. Candidates 

42 



The University of Maine 

for the short course in pharmacy will be examined on no topics beyond 
simple equations of the first degree. A satisfactory preparation may be 
obtained from Wells' Academic, or Wentvvorth's School Algebra or any 
equivalent text. 

Plane Geometry. — The first five books of Wells', or of Wentworth's 
Geometry, or an equivalent. Numerical exercises, original propositions 
and the neat and careful construction of figures should not be neglected. 
The examination will include original propositions for demonstration or 
construction. 

Solid Geometry.— Books VI-IX of Wells', or books VI-VIII of Went- 
worth's Geometry, or an equivalent. The examination will be planned 
to test the candidate's ability to apply the theorems to the computation 
of surfaces and volumes, as well as his readiness in demonstration. 

* Chemistry. — The necessary ground is covered by the following text- 
books : Fisher, Remsen, Roscoe (inorganic part), Shepard, Storer and 
Lindsay, Williams. 

Physical Geography (Physiography). — A satisfactory preparation 
may be obtained from Appleton's Physical Geography. 

* Physics. — The work usually covered in one year in a good fitting 
school. 

Physiology. — Cells and tissues, skeleton, muscles, blood and circula- 
tion, respiration, nutrition and digestion, lymphathic system, excretory 
organs, nervous system, special senses, hygiene. 

Elementary Subjects 

Descriptive Geography. — The usual school course. Required for 
short pharmacy course only. 

Arithmetic. — The usual school course, including the metric system of 
weights and measures. Required for the short pharmacy course only. 



* The work in these sciences must include certified notebooks exhibit- 
ing the results of experimental work performed by the student. These 
notebooks should be presented at the examination. 



43 



The University of Maine 

REQUIREMENTS FOR GRADUATION 

The college year is divided equally into a fall term and a spring term. 
Five recitation hours a week of successful work for one term entitle a 
student to one credit. The minimum regular work for a term is fifteen 
hours a week (exclusive of physical training and military science), 
leading to three credits. Six or seven credits thus represent the mini- 
mum work of a year. In making up the quota of studies, laboratory 
work, and other studies not requiring preparation, count as half time — 
that is, two hours in the laboratory are counted as equivalent to one 
hour. The hours devoted to such studies are marked with a dagger (f) 
in the detailed description of courses of instruction. 

Except in the College of Law and the Short Pharmacy Course, candi- 
dates for graduation are required to complete a four-years course of 
study by securing from twenty-five to thirty credits, according to the 
course chosen. 



44 



The University of Maine 



DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION 



AGRONOMY 

Professor Hurd; Mr. Gilbert. 

Ag i. Soils. — Lectures and recitations beginning with the classifica- 
tion of and fundamental principles underlying the science of agriculture. 
The nature, origin, formation, and classification of soils. The relation 
of soils to plants, water, heat, gases, etc. The chemical elements in soils. 
Factors determining soil fertility. Soil inoculation. The conservation 
of soil moisture. The adaptability of crops to different kinds of soils. 
The objects, benefits, and methods of tillage. Reasons for necessity 
and benefits of crop rotation. The improvement of unproductive land. 
The conditions requiring, necessity for, advantages of, and methods of 
drainage. Two hours a week. Fall term. 

Ag 2. Soils. — A course taken in connection with Ag I, consisting of 
a study of the different soils under field conditions. Soil surveying and 
mapping. The collecting and sampling of soils for laboratory work. 
This laboratory course is designed to prepare the student better to under- 
stand the different methods of treatment of soils and the effect of these 
methods upon moisture, texture, aeration, fertility, and production. The 
work comprises the determination of such questions as specific gravity, 
relative gravity, water-holding capacity, evaporation, and capillary power 
of various types of soils and the mechanical analysis of soils, f Two 
hours a week. Fall term. 

Ag 3. Agricultural Engineering and Farm Mechanics. — Farm 
surveying and drainage. The platting of farms and the measurement of 
land. Levelling for drains, estimating size of tile required, cost of drain, 
etc. The making of roads, with practice in the construction of roads on 
the college farm. A study of the simpler laws of mechanics used in 
operating farm implements ; the principles of draft, the handling in the 
field, taking apart, and putting together, of the different classes of farm 
implements in possession of the department. The relative merits of 
wind, gasoline, steam, and electricity, as sources of power on the farm. 
Farm management and operations. Tire keeping of farm accounts, the 
planning of a season's work, the management of men and teams, and 
estimated cost of the different operations. The planning, designing, 
location, and construction of farm buildings, including water supply, 
sewerage, etc. f Four hours a zveek. Fall term. 

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The University of Maine 

Ag 4. Manures and Fertilizers.— A study of the value of stable 
manure in successful crop production. Its chemical composition, preser- 
vation, best methods of storing, and time and manner of applying on 
the land. 

the land. The source of chemical composition and comparative value 
of chemicals used as fertilizers. Considerable attention is paid to the 
working out of fertilizer formulae suited to the needs of different soils 
and special crops. Practice in home mixing fertilizers and field tests 
are given students each year on the college farm. The importance of 
lime in agriculture, its physical and chemical effect on different soils, 
best farms to buy, when to apply, and the amount to use. Two hours 
a week. Spring term. 

Ag 5. Field Crops.— Lectures and recitation work on the history, 
distribution, uses, chief characteristics, and adaptability of the principal 
farm crops. The best methods of producing them, including crop rota- 
tions, preparation of the land, fertilizing and seeding, a study and treat- 
ment of the injurious insects and diseases affecting them, and the 
harvesting, marketing, and storing of crops. Three hours a week. Fall 
term. 

Ag 6. Advanced Agronomy.— Elective, advanced work for those who 
have completed the required work for the first three years. Lectures 
and recitations along lines of Experiment Station work. The applica- 
tion of plant breeding to the improvement of farm crops. The student 
will carry out original investigations along some chosen line under the 
direction of the instructor. Three hours a week. Fall term. 

Ag 7. Advanced Agronomy.— A continuation of course 6. Two hours 
a week. Spring term. 

Ag 8. General Agriculture.— A history of agriculture from the 
earliest times, including that of the Jews, Egyptians, and Romans, to the 
present day. The beginnings of British agriculture, and the development 
of modern agriculture with especial reference to that of England 
Germany, France, and other foreign countries. The agriculture of the 
United States, its influence on social conditions, its relation to the State 
and Nation. The importance of our leading products, and their effect on 
the world's commercial life. The agriculture of the different sections. 
Rural life and rural development. Lectures supplemented by illustrative 
material. Elective, and open to all students of the University. One 
hour a week. Spring term. 

ANIMAL INDUSTRY 

Professor Gowell; Mr. Gilbert. 
An 1 Animal Breeding.— Lectures and recitations on the principles 
of breeding, including heredity, atavism, variation, prepotency, in-breed- 

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The University of Maine 

ing, line-breeding and cross-breeding. Studying the histories, develop- 
ment, and economic values of the different classes and breeds of cattle 
and horses. Tzvo hours a week. Spring term. 

An 2. Laboratory Animal Breeding. — Studying the different breeds ; 
practice in the use of score cards in judging animals. Two hours a 
week. Spring term. 

An 3. Animal Breeding. — A continuation of course 1. Sheep, swine, 
and poultry breeding; the handling and care of breeding and growing 
animals ; the adaptation of the different breeds to prevailing conditions — 
judging by score cards; the use of incubators and brooders. The work 
consists of lectures and recitations, with laboratory exercises in the 
animal and poultry quarters. Three hours a week. Fall term. 

An 4. Animal Feeding. — Food requirements of different kinds of 
animals. Compositions of foods, and the nutrients furnished by them; 
feeding formulas; calculating rations; valuation of foods; pasturing; 
soiling, methods of feeding. Two hours a week. Fall term. 

An 5. Dairying. — Lectures and recitations upon the composition and 
formation of milk ; its sanitary production ; aeration ; Pasteurization ; 
sterilization; creaming, fermenting; the manufacture of butter and 
cheese. Two hours a week. Spring term. 

An 6. Laboratory Dairying. — Practice in handling and testing milk 
and cream for acidity and solids; curing cream; making butter and 
cheese ; operating dairy machinery. Ten hours a week for four weeks. 
Spring term. 

An 7. Advanced Animal Industry. — Elective work for those that 
have taken An 1 to An 4 inclusive. A study of investigations in breed- 
ing, feeding, dairying, and poultry management made at the Experiment 
Stations of the country; and the practical application of the findings to 
the everyday work of the department. The time varies. Fall term. 

An 8. Advanced Animal Industry. — A continuation of course 7. 
The time varies. Spring term. 

ART 

Professor Huddilston offers certain courses in art which are described 
in connection with the department of Greek. See page 67. 

BIBLIOGRAPHY 

Mr. Jones. 
Bb 1. Bibliography. — Origin of the alphabet ; development of writ- 
ing; inscriptions; manuscripts; inventions of printing; early printed 
books ; modern bookmaking ; bookbinding and the care of books ; library 
processes and aids ; public documents ; periodicals ; libraries, ancient and 
modern. A lecture course, with collateral reading and reference work. 
One hour a week. Spring term. 

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The University of Maine 

Three lectures are given on The Library and Its Use, Classification 
and the Catalogue, and Reference Books and Their Use. Required of 
freshmen. Fall term. 

BIOLOGY 

Professor Drew; Professor Russeee; Mr. Cummings; 
Miss Balentine. 

The subjects given below are arranged numerically, but not in the 
order in which it is best for students to pursue them. It is desirable that 
all intending to take biology should begin with courses i and 2. 

Bl 1. General Biology.— This course is devoted to the study of the 
general principles governing the activities of living things, both plants 
and animals. It is open to all students, and should form the basis for 
other work in either zoology or botany. It is to be taken in connection 
with course 2. Two hours a zucck. Fall term. 

Bl 2. Laboratory Bioeogy.— To be taken in connection with course 1. 
t Tivo hours a week. Fall term. 

Bl 5. Zoology (Invertebrate animals).— Representatives of the 
invertebrate groups of animals are studied in the laboratory, class-room, 
and field, where attention is given to their habits, comparative anatomy! 
and to some extent to their embryology and classification. This course 
is to be taken in connection with course 6, and is not complete without 
courses 7 and 8. Courses 1 and 2 are required as a preparation. Two- 
hours a week. Fall term. 

Bl 6. Laboratory Zoology.— To be taken in connection with course 5. 
\Six hours a zveek. Fall term. 

Bl 7. Zoology (Vertebrate Animals).— A continuation of course 5. 
Types of the vertebrates are studied and their structures compared. A 
few weeks are devoted to the embryology of the frog. This course is to 
be taken in connection with course 8. It must be preceded by courses 
1. 2. 5. and 6. Tzvo hours a zveek. Spring term. 

Bl 8. Laboratory Zoology.— To be taken in connection with course 7. 
f Six hours a week. Spring term. 

Bl 9. Physiology.— Attention is given to the physiological activities 
of the human body, with enough anatomy to render the physiological 
discussions intelligible, and enough hygiene to serve as a guide for the 
intelligent care of the body. It is recommended that this course be- 
preceded by courses 1 and 2. Tzvo hours a zveek. Spring term 

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The University of Maine 

Bl ii. Entomology. — Insects are studied with special reference to 
their habits, life-histories, and structure. Attention is given to their 
economic importance, and the methods of controlling them, f Four 
hours a week. Spring term. 

Bl 14. Advanced Zoology. — This course offers an opportunity for 
special zoological work along lines best suited to the future plans of the 
student. It may consist of field work, laboratory work, or reading, or a 
combination of all three. The time varies, and the work may be con- 
tinued a number of terms. Fall and spring terms. 

Bl 15. Veterinary Science. — Lectures, demonstrations, and clinics, 
illustrated by models, natural preparations, and living animals. Three 
hours a week. Given in the spring term of even years. 

Bl 16. Animal Anatomy. — A laboratory course intended to make the 
student familiar with the location and appearance of the organs of the 
bodies of our domestic animals, f Tc7i hours a week for nine weeks. 
Given in the spring term of odd years. 

Bl 17. Bacteriology. — An elementary laboratory course, including the 
preparation of culture media and a critical study of the morphological 
and biological characteristics of a few typical bacteria. Students in 
agriculture give special attention to the bacteriology of the dairy, f Ten 
hours a week for nine zveeks. Spring term. 

Bl 18. Animal Histology. — A laboratory course in normal animal 
histology. Starting with perfectly fresh material, the work consists in 
the preparation, hardening, embedding, cutting, staining, and mounting 
of the various normal tissues and organs of animals, f Ten hours a 
week for nine zveeks. First part of spring term. 

Bl 19. Laboratory Bacteriology. — An advanced course, f Ten hours 
a week for nine weeks. Spring term. 

Bl 20. Organic Evolution. — Some of the more important facts on 
which the theory is based are presented for consideration, and subjects 
for individual reading and essays are assigned. One hour a zveek. 
Spring term. 

Bl 21. General Botany (Flowering Plants). — The course includes a 
brief consideration of the fundamental principles of the structure, physio- 
logical functions, habits, and systematic relations of flowering plants. 
This course must be taken in connection with course 22, and should 
follow courses 1 and 2. One hour a week. Spring term. 

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The University of Maine 

Bl 22. Laboratory Botany. — To be taken in connection with course 
21. f Four hours a week. Spring term. 

Bl 23. General Botany (Flowerless Plants). — Type forms of algae, 
fungi, lichens, liverworts, mosses, and ferns are studied in the laboratory 
and in the field. Attention is given to their structures, life histories, and 
habitats, as well as their relations to the higher forms of plants. This 
course must be preceded by courses 1 and 2, and should be preceded by 
courses 21 and 22. f Four hours a week. Fall term. 

Bl 25. Plant Histology. — The minute structure of plants, including 
the anatomy of the cell, is studied, and attention is given to growth, 
variation, and adaptation of cellular structures, and the formation and 
distribution of tissue systems. Killing, staining, and mounting plant 
tissues forms part of the work. This course is to be taken in connection 
with course 26 and must be preceded by courses 21 and 22. One hour 
a week. Fall term. 

Bl 26. Laboratory Plant Histology. — To be taken in connection 
with course 25. f Four hours a week. Fall term. 

Bl 27. Plant Physiology. — Attention is given to the physiological 
activities of plants: the processes of nutrition and reproduction; the 
phenomena of respiration, transpiration, and growth ; response to various 
stimuli, such as light, heat, moisture, and gravity. This course must be 
preceded by courses 21 and 22 and should be preceded by courses 23, 25. 
and 26. It is advisable to take this course in connection with course 28. 
One hour a week. Spring term. 

Bl 28. Laboratory Plant Physiology. — To be taken in connection 
with course 27. f Two hours a week. Spring term. 

Bl 29. Agricultural Botany. — This course deals with the plants of 
the farm and consists of three parts. 1. Seeds. — Structure, function 
and dispersal. Buying, selling, testing, and identification. 2. Weeds. — 
Origin and distribution; their benefits, disadvantages, and methods of 
eradication ; systematic study of Maine weeds. 3. Grasses. — Origin and 
distribution of the important grasses; their duration, reproduction, and 
pollination; identification of species. Ths course must be taken in con- 
nection with course 30. Two hours a week. Fall term. 

Bl 30. Laboratory Agricultural Botany. — To be taken in connec- 
tion with course 29. f Two hours a week. Fall term. 

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The University of Maine 

Bl 31. Plant Pathology. — Attention is given to the diseases of plants 
resulting from the attacks of fungi and those induced by unfavorable 
environment. The causes, symptoms, and treatment of the common 
diseases of familiar plants are considered. This course must be taken 
in connection with course 32. One hour a week. Given in the spring 
term of odd years. 

Bl 32. Laboratory Plant Pathology. — To be taken in connection 
with course 31. j Two hours a week. Spring term. 

Bl 37. Advanced Botany. — This course offers an opportunity for 
special work in botany along lines best suited to the future plans of the 
student. It may consist of field work, laboratory work, or reading, or 
a combination of all three. The time varies and the work may be con- 
tinued a number of terms. Fall and spring terms. 

CHEMISTRY 

Professor Aubert; Professor Merrill; Mr. Davis; Dr. Bedford; 

Mr. Seabury. 
Ch 1. General Chemistry. — Recitations and lectures on the general 
principles of chemistry, illustrated by charts, experiments, etc. To 
obtain credit for this course, - : t must be accompanied by course 3, and 
followed by courses 2 and 4, unless a special excuse is obtained. The 
text-book is Jones's Elements of Inorganic Chemistry. Two hours a 
week. Fall term. 

Ch 2. General Chemistry. — A continuation of course 1. Three 
hours a week. Spring term. 

Ch. 3. Laboratory Chemistry. — Practical work to accompany course 
1. The text-book is Smith's Laboratory Outline of General Chemistry, 
f Two hours a week. Fall term. 

Ch 4. Laboratory Chemistry. — A continuation of course 3, to accom- 
pany course 2, with elementary qualitative analysis for those who 
advance far enough, f Two hours a week. Spring term. 

Ch 5. Advanced Inorganic Chemistry. — Lectures and recitations, 
illustrated by specimens. The text-book is Jones's Principles of Inor- 
ganic Chemistry. Two hours a week. Fall term. No credit, unless 
course 6 is taken, except by special arrangement. Open to students that 
have taken courses 1, 2, 3, and 4. 

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The University of Main? 

Ch 6. Advanced Inorganic Chemistry. — A continuation of course 5. 
Three hours a zveek. Spring term. 

Ch 7. Elementary Organic Chemistry. — The marsh gas series. 
Lectures and recitations, illustrated by specimens. The text-book is 
Remsen's Organic Chemistry. Three hours a week. Fall term. This 
course must be followed by course 8, and preceded by courses I, 2, 3, 4, 
5 and 6, except for those especially admitted. 

Ch 8. Elementary Organic Chemistry. — The unsaturated compounds 
and the benzene series. A continuation of course 7. Three hours a 
week. Spring term. 

Ch 12. Chemical Preparations. — The preparation and purification 
of typical organic and inorganic substances. Open to students that have 
taken courses 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, and 8. Text-book, Aubert's Organic and 
Inorganic Preparations. Five hours a zveek. Fall term. 

Ch 13. Descriptive Mineralogy. — The text-book is Moses and 
Parson's Elements of Mineralogy. Three hours a week. Spring term. 

Ch 14. Qualitative Analysis. — A laboratory study of the chief 
elements and their derivatives with a view to a clear understanding of 
their properties. Supplemented by class room work. The text used is 
Prescott and Johnson's Qualitative Analysis. Not less than f eight 
hours per week, unless by special arrangement. Fall term. Open to 
students that have taken courses 1, 2, 3, and 4, except for students in the 
Short Pharmacy Course. It is generally advised that course 5 be taken 
with this course, and it must be followed by course 15. 

Ch 15. Qualitative Analysis. — A continuation of course 14, with 
the application of analytical methods to the determination of unknown 
substances of increasing complexity. Elementary analysis by means of 
the spectroscope is given. Course 6 is usually an accompanying study, 
except for students in the Short Pharmacy Course. Time, the same as 
course 14. Spring term. 

Ch 16. Quantitative Analysis. — Gravimetric determinations. The 
text is Olsen's Quantitative Chemical Analysis. Not less than t eight 
hours per week, unless by special arrangement. For satisfactory prepar- 
ation, the student should have taken courses 1, 2, 3, 4, 14, and 15; and 
he should add courses 18 and 19. 

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The University of Maine 

Ch 18. Quantitative Analysis.— Analysis of complex alloys, 
minerals, etc. The text used is Clowes and Coleman's Quantitative 
Analysis. Not less than f eight hours per week, unless by special 
arrangement. Fall term. Open to students that have taken course 16 
and its requirements. 

Ch 19. Volumetric Analysis and Assaying.— Acidimetry, alkali- 
metry, oxydimetry; gold and silver assaying. Text, time, and general 
requirements the same as for course 18. 

Ch 20. Agricultural Analysis. — The analysis of fodders, fertilizers, 
milk, and other products. The methods are those recommended by the 
Association of Official Agricultural Chemists. Except in special cases, 
the time and requirements are the same as for course 18. 

Ch 21. Toxicology and Urinalysis. — The determination of the more 
common poisons ; the analysis of urine. Text, Aubert's Urinalysis and 
Toxicology. Time, and general requirements, the same as for course 18. 

Ch 22. Thesis Work. — The Thesis must embody the result of original 
work in analysis or research, f Fifteen hours a week for eleven weeks. 
Spring term. Open to students that have taken courses 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 
7, 8, 12, 14, 15, 16, 18, 19, 20, 21, 23, 24, and 28. 

Ch 23. Organic Chemistry. — An advanced course. Text-book, 
Joannis's Cours de Chimie, Vol. III. Three hours a zveek. Fall term. 

Ch 24a. Industrial Chemistry. — General processes of technical 
chemistry, and selected topics, including the principal manufactured 
products of special interest. Lectures and recitations. Text-books, 
Thorp's Outlines of Industrial Chemistry and Fischer's Lehrbuch der 
Chemischen Technologic Two hours a week. Fall term. Open to 
students that have completed courses 5, 6, 7, and 8. 

Ch 24b. Industrial Chemistry. — A continuation of course 24a. 
Two hours a zveek. Spring term. 

Ch 25a. Technical Analysis.— An advanced course in analysis of 
ores and industrial products. Open to students that have completed 
courses 16, 18, 19, and their requirements. f Five hours a zveek. Fall 
term. 

Ch 25b. Technical Analysis.— Organic technical products, and 
advanced mineral analysis, t Five hours a week. Spring term. 

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The University of Maine 

Ch 26. Physical Chemical Methods. — The determination of mole- 
cular weights by the vapor density, boiling point, and freezing point 
methods. The use of the refractometer and the polariscope. f Five 
hours a week. Spring term. 

Ch 28. Dyeing. — The practical application of dyes to cotton, wool 
and silk, t Fifteen hours a week for two weeks. Spring term. 

Ch 29. Agricultural Chemistry. — A course on the chemistry of 
soils and fertilizers. It includes the relation of soils to heat and mois- 
ture; the mechanical condition of soils best suited to plant growth, and 
the objects to be gained by cultivation; the origin, composition, prepara- 
tion, and use of commercial fertilizers ; the supply, composition, care, and 
use of farm manures, and the general considerations which pertain to 
the maintenance of soil fertility. Five hours a week. Given in the 
spring term of even years. Open to students that have completed courses 
1, 2, 3, and 4. 

Ch 30. Biological Chemistry. — Lectures and recitations on the com- 
position of the air, soils, natural waters, and plants ; the source and 
assimilation of plant food ; the composition of the animal body and of 
food materials ; the chemical changes involved in the digestion and 
assimilation of food ; the chemistry of milk and dairy products ; and the 
chemical processes and methods of investigation by which these subjects 
are studied. Five hours a week. Fall term. 

Ch 31. Chemical Equations. — Principles governing chemical reac- 
tion; tneir application to equations; advanced equation writing; oxida- 
tion and reduction. The text-book is Prescott and Johnson's Qualitative 
Chemical Analysis. Two hours a week. Spring term. 

CIVICS 

Professor Rogers. 
Cv 1. Constitutional Law and History. — An outline of Anglo- 
Saxon institutions, the development of the English Constitution, the 
growth and political conditions of the American colonies, the Articles 
of Confederation, the adoption of the Constitution, and the comparative 
study of the Federal and the State Constitutions from the historical and 
legal standpoints. The text-book is Rogers's Our System of Govern- 
ment. Five hours a week. Spring term. 

Cv 2. Political Economy. — Instruction is given by lectures. Topical 
readings and investigations are required. Five hours a week. Fall term. 

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The University of Maine 

Cv 3. Advanced Political Economy. — A continuation of course 2. 
One hour a week. Spring term. 

Cv 4. International Law. — The text-book is Lawrence's Interna- 
tional Law. Five hours a week. Fall term. 

Cv 5. Public Finance. — A study of taxation and public expenditures. 
Four hours a week. Spring term. 

Cv 6. Colonial Problems. — Three hours a week. Given in the 
spring term of even years. 

Cv 7. Sociology. — The text-book is Giddings's Sociology. Three 
hours a week. Given in the spring term of odd years. 

Cv 8. Roman Law. — Two hours a week. Spring term. 

Cv 9. Anthropology. — A study of primitive man and of the origin 
-and growth of civilization. The text-book is Tylor's Anthropology. 
j. hree hours a week. Fall term. 

Cv 10. Business Law. — One hour a week. Spring term. 

CIVIL ENGINEERING 

Professor Boardman ; Professor Weston ; Mr. Hamlin ; Mr. Grover. 
Ce 1. Plane Surveying. — Recitations on the general principles of 
plane surveying. Instruments, their adjustments and uses, land survey 
computations, direct leveling, and the variation of the magnetic needle. 
The text-book is Raymond's Surveying and Pence and Ketchum's Field 
Manual. Two hours a week. Spring term. 

Ce 2. Field Work in Surveying. — The use of the chain, compass, 
transit, and level. The adjustment of instruments; original surveys 
made. Plats are prepared of surveys made in the field. The text-book 
is Field Manual by Pence and Ketchum. f Six hours a week. Spring 
term. 

Ce 3. Railroad Curves and Earthwork. — Lectures and recitations 
on the theory of railroad curves, switches, turnouts, slope stakes, and 
the calculation of earthwork. The text-book is Allen's Railroad Curves 
and Earthwork, together with Allen's Tables. Three hours a week. 
Fall term. 

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The University of Maine 

Ce 4. Railroad Work. — The survey of a railroad about three miles 
long. The preliminary and location surveys are made, including the 
running in of the curves, establishing the grade, setting the slope stakes, 
and the calculation of the earthwork, f Six hours a week. Fall term. 

Ce 5. Highway Engineering. — The location, construction, and 
improvement of country roads under different conditions of soil, climate, 
and traffic. One hour a week. Fall term. 

Ce 6. Drawing. — Problems in projections. Dimension and detail 
drawing, and tracing. Special attention is given to lettering. Fall term. 
t Four hours a week. 

Ce 7. Drawing. — Isometric and cabinet projections, perspective, 
tracing, and lettering. Stereotomy, giving the application of the methods 
of descriptive geometry to the preparation of drawings for arches, retain- 
ing walls, bridge abutments, piers, etc. t Ten hours a week ior five 
weeks. Fall term, t Ten hours a zveek for five weeks. Spring term. 

Ce 8. Sanitary Engineering. — Sewerage systems ; drainage and 
sewerage of towns; drainage of sewerage systems; sewage disposal; 
water supply and purification ; sewerage treatment. The text-book is 
Folwell's Sewerage. Two hours a week. Fall term. 

Ce 9. Surveying. — The plane table, topographical surveying, precise 
leveling, the elements of geodesy, the measurement of a base line, trian- 
gulation. This course is given during the first two weeks following 
commencement, and counts as 100 hours. Required of juniors. 

Ce 10. Hydraulics. Fundamental data ; hydrostatics ; theoretical 
hydraulics ; instruments and observations ; theoretical and actual flow 
through orifices, weirs, tubes, pipes, and conduits ; dynamic pressure of 
water. The text-book is Merriman's Hydraulics. Three hours a week. 
Spring term. 

Ce 11. Hydraulic Field Work. — The measurement of the flow of 
rivers is illustrated by the use of the current meter, and various forms 
of floats. Trips are made to the United States Geological Survey gaging 
station located on the Penobscot river between Howland and West 
Enfield, where discharge measurements are made, the data thus obtained 
being used together with that obtained from the Survey to plot the 
rating enrve, etc. The measurements are reported to the Survey. The 
charge for this course is $5.00. t Three hours a week. Fall term. 

56 



The University of Maine 

Ce 12. Structures. — A continuation of course 21. The theory of 
stresses in framed structures ; graphical statics ; the principles of design- 
ing; the plate girder, bridge trusses, roof trusses. The object of this 
course is to train the student in the application of the principles of 
applied mechanics. Three hours a week. Fall term. 

Ce 13. Structures. — A continuation of course 12. Higher structures, 
including draw bridges, cantilever bridges, suspension bridges, arches, 
steel buildings. Five hours a zveek. Spring term. 

Ce 14. Designing. — Designs for some of the common types of steel 
structures, and' preparation of drawings for the shop, f Ten hours a 
week. Fall term. 

Ce 15. Designing. — A continuation of course 14 and the preparation 
of a thesis, t Fifteen hours a week for ten weeks. Spring term. 

Ce 16. Hydraulic Engineering. — Rainfall, evaporation, and stream 
flow. Water meters, water wheels, and motors. The development and 
utilization of water power. The collection, purification, and distribution 
of water for city supplies. Two hours a week. Fall term. 

Ce 17. Hydraulic Engineering. — A continuation of course 16. Two 
hours a week. Spring term. 

Ce 18. Sanitary Science. — Lectures on the causes and prevention of 
disease, sanitation, and the public health, and the relations of the engineer 
to this work. One hour a week. Fall term. 

Ce 19. Railroad Engineering. — A course discussing the economics 
of railroad location, also the subjects of brakes, signals, rolling-stock, 
yards, stations, etc. Tzvo hours a zveek. Spring term. 

Ce 20. Masonry Construction. — Building stone; cements and their 
tests ; mortar ; concrete ; piles ; foundations ; pneumatic caissons ; open 
caissons; bridge piers and abutments. Lectures and recitations. The 
text-book is Baker's Masonry Construction. Two hours a week. Fall 
term. 

Ce 21. Structures. — The theory of the simple beam; loads; reac- 
tions; vertical shear; shear; bending moment; influence lines. The 
object of this course is to give the student a drill in finding vertical 
shear and bending moment under different systems of loadings, and to 
familiarize him with the use of steel hand books, the moment diagram, 
different tables, and the slide rule. Tzvo hours a week. Spring term. 

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The University of Maine 

ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING 

Professor Ganong ; Mr. Carpenter. 
Ee i. Eectricity and Magnetism. — This course continues the subject 
of electricity and magnetism begun in physics. The work is taken up 
by text-book, lectures, and problems. The text-book is Cyclopedia of 
Applied Electricity. Two hours a week. Fall term. Required of juniors 
in Electrical Engineering. 

Ee 2. Electricity and Magnetism and Dynamo Design. — A con- 
tinuation of course I, with the application of principles to the problems 
of dynamo design. The work is taken up by text-book, lectures, and 
problems. Three hours a iveek. Spring term. Required of juniors in 
Electrical Engineering. 

Ee 3. Electrical Machinery. — A course on the design and construc- 
tion of direct current generators and motors. The work is taken by 
lectures and problems. The text-book is Esterline's The Design of Elec- 
trical Machinery. Three hours a week. Fall term. Required of seniors 
in Electrical Engineering. 

Ee 4. Alternating Current Machinery. — In this course are con- 
sidered the principles involved in the design, construction, and operation 
of alternating current generators, motors, transformers, and rotary con- 
verters. The text-book is Jackson's Alternating Currents and Alter- 
nating Current Machinery. Five hours a week for the first nine weeks. 
Spring term. Required of seniors in Electrical Engineering. 

Ee 5. Design of Direct Current Machines. — This course is taken 
up in the drawing room. Each student is required to make the calcu- 
lations and drawings of a direct current dynamo, f Four hours a week. 
Fall term. Required of seniors in Electrical Engineering. 

Ee 6. Design of Alternating Current Machines. — A drawing room 
course similar to course 5. The calculations and drawings are made for 
an alternating current generator, f Five hours a week for nine weeks. 
First half of spring term. Required of seniors in Electrical Engineering. 

Ee 7. Laboratory Work, Direct Currents. — Tests of electrical 
instruments. Experimental work with generators and motors. Power 
and photometric tests of electric lamps. Care and management of the 
college lighting plant. The charge for this course is $3. t Four hours 
a week. Fall term. Required of seniors in Electrical Engineering. 

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The University of Maine 

Ee 8. Laboratory Work, Alternating Currents. — A course similar 
to course 7. Tests of alternating current instruments. Experimental 
work with generators, motors, transformers and rotary converters, 
work with generators, motors, transformers and rotary converters. The 
charge for this course is $2.50. Required of seniors in Electrical Engi- 
neering. 

Ee 9. Dynamos. — The general principles and theory of design. Dif- 
ferent types of machines. Practical considerations in the construction 
and operation of direct current generators and motors. Connecting and 
starting of generators and motors. Illustrations by laboratory experi- 
ments. The text-book is Cyclopedia of Applied Electricity. Three 
Jiours a week. Fall term. Required of juniors in Mechanical Engi- 
neering. 

Ee 10. Dynamo Laboratory Work. — Practice in the connecting and 
running of direct current generators and motors. Tests for regulation, 
heating, efficiency, and insulation. Offered for seniors in Mechanical 
Engineering. The charge for this course is $2.50. 

Ee 12. Laboratory Work, Direct Currents. — Introductory to course 
7. t Two hours a week. Spring term. Junior year. The charge for 
this course is $2. 

Ee 13. Alternating Currents. — Theory of alternating currents. 
The text-book is Esty's Alternating Current Machinery. Three hours 
a week. Fall term. Required of seniors in Electrical Engineering. 

Ee 14. Electrical Engineering. — Polyphase alternating currents and 
wiring. Theory and construction of telegraph and telephone instru- 
ments. Methods of operating and testing. The course is taken by 
lectures. Three hours a week for nine weeks. Last half of spring term. 
Required of seniors in Electrical Engineering. 

Ee 16. Thesis Work. — The designing of electrical apparatus, labora- 
tory investigation, or commercial testing, with results presented in proper 
ments. Methods of operating and testing. The course is given by 
form. Required of seniors in Electrical Engineering. 



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The University of Maine 

ENGLISH 

Professor Estabrooke; Professor Thompson; Mr. Prince; 
Mr. Sprague. 
Two credits in English are required for graduation. Courses 3 and 4, 
which are prescribed for freshmen, give 1 1-5 credits. The remaining 
4-5 credit is regularly obtained by taking courses 1 and 2; but students 
especially interested in other courses in English may, upon consultation 
with the instructors, make certain substitutions (see under courses 6, 9, 
17, and 18). Course 1 is regularly taken during the freshman year and 
course 2 during the sophomore year; however, upon sufficient grounds, 
either course may be postponed for one year. 

Eh ia and 2a. Public Speaking. — The purpose of this course is to 
give the student a practical knowledge of the fundamental principles of 
effective public speaking. The first term's work consists in voice train- 
ing by means of practice work in classes, reading aloud for interpretation, 
and the acquirement of ease in pose and gesture. During the second 
term the training thus acquired will be applied to the delivery of model 
public orations, and especially to speeches of the student's own compo- 
sition. Special attention will be given to the correction of individual 
faults. Provided their other work is satisfactory, the eight students 
obtaining the highest grades in this course are chosen to compete in the 
sophomore prize declamations. During the first term the sections will 
meet once a week; during the second, once in tzvo weeks. The assign- 
ment of sections is made by the instructor in the second week of the 
term. 

Eh 2a and 2b. English Composition. — This course — to be taken 
throughout the sophomore year — supplements the work of the freshman 
year by giving further practice in narrative, expository, and argumenta- 
tive writing. Monthly themes are required, each containing from 1,000 
to 1.200 words. There will be a conference on each theme. 

Eh 3. English Composition and Rhetoric. — This course gives both 
theoretical and practical instruction. The theory is taught by class-room 
work based on Espenshade's Composition and Rhetoric. The practice 
is obtained by exercises written in the class-room, and by weekly themes. 
The themes are criticized in detail by the instructor, and those falling 
below, the standard must be rewritten. In addition to the study of the 
text-book and the writing and rewriting of themes, certain outside read- 
ing from standard authors is required. This course is prescribed for 
freshmen. Three hours a week. Fall term. 

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The University of Maine 

Eh 4. English Composition and Rhetoric. — Extended study of the 
forms of discourse: narration, description, exposition, and argumenta- 
tion ; construction of outlines, and practice in the different forms by- 
exercises in the class-room and by weekly themes. The text-books are 
Cairn's Forms of Discourse, and Lewis's Specimens of the Forms of 
Discourse. This course is prescribed for freshmen. Three hours a 
week. Spring term. 

Eh 5. Old English. — Elements of Old English grammar; reading of 
easy prose and poetry. Constant reference is made to the relation of old 
English to modern English and modern German. The text-book is 
Smith's Old English Grammar. Three hours a week. Given in the 
spring term of even years. 

Eh 6. English Composition and Literature. — One two-page theme 
a week, and occasional longer themes, in connection with the study of 
selections from English prose writings. Among the writings studied 
will be selections from Addison, Swift, Johnson, Goldsmith, and Burke. 
Two hours a week. Fall term. 

Eh 7. English Composition and Literature. — A continuation of 
course 6. Among the writings studied will be selections from Macaulay, 
Carlyle, Ruskin, Newman, Matthew Arnold, and Stevenson. Two hour* 
a week. Spring term. 

Courses 6 and 7 are open to those that have taken courses 3 and 4; 
and students especially interested in courses 6 and 7 may, upon consulta- 
tion with the instructor, substitute them for courses 1 and 2. 

Eh 8. English Literature. — The text-book, Pancoast's Introduction 
to English Literature, is supplemented by frequent lectures, and by study 
in the library. A few masterpieces are studied in detail. Attention is 
given to historical and social conditions, and the students are required 
to prepare essays upon the characters and times studied. Two hours a 
week. Fall term. 

Eh 9. English Literature. — A continuation of course 8. The 
authors studied are chiefly Elizabethan dramatists. Three hours a week. 
Spring term. 

Eh 10. English Literature. — A continuation of course 9. Study of 
Elizabethan writers completed. Study of writers of the Restoration. 
Two hours a week. Fall term. 

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The University of Maine 

Eh ii. American Literature. — Study of the most important Ameri- 
can authors of the nineteenth century. The text-book is Bronson's 
American Literature. Three hours a week. Spring term. 

Eh 12. English Literature. — Study of the structure and qualities of 
the English novel. The text-book is Perry's Study of Prose Fiction. 
Two hours a week. Fall term. 

Eh 13. English Literature. — A continuation of course 12. In this 
course selections from English novelists are read critically, in order to 
determine the characteristic qualities of each. At least one entire work 
of a selected author is carefully studied. Three hours a week. Spring 
term. 

Eh 14. American Poets. — This course is designed to make the 
student acquainted with the more important American poets, especially 
with Poe, Bryant, Longfellow, Emerson, and Lowell. The text-book is 
Bronson's American Literature. Three hours a week. Given in the 
spring term. 

Eh 15. Victorian Poets. — Tennyson, Browning, Rossetti, and Arnold. 
A study of selected poems, together with readings in the works of these 
poets and of contemporary poets. Three hours a week. Fall term. 

Eh 17. Forensic Writing. — A course in the principles of written 
argumentation with a view to spoken debate. Lectures and written 
work. Open only to those that have taken courses 3 and 4, or an equiv- 
alent. Tzvo hours a week. Fall term. 

Eh 18. Oral Debate. — A course in application of the principles of 
argumentation to spoken debate. Lectures and class room work. Open 
only to those that have taken course 17, or an equivalent. This course 
is not given unless elected by at least eight students. Two hours a week. 
Spring term. 

Courses 17 and 18 may be substituted for courses 1 and 2. 

Eh 19. Forms of English Poetry. — The study of the foot, the line,, 
the stanza, the ballad, the sonnet, the ode, the epic, the metrical romance, 
etc. Two hours a week. Fall term. 

Eh 20. English Romantic Poets. — A general view of the English 
Romantic Movement with some attention to the characteristics of the 
poetry that preceded this movement ; a study of selected poems from the 

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The University of Maine 

writings of Thomson, Collins, Gray, Cowper, and Burns. Two hours a 
week. Fall term. 

Eh 21. English Romantic Poets. — A continuation of course 20. 
Study of selected poems from the writings of Wordsworth, Coleridge,. 
Scott, Byron, Shelley, and Keats. Tzvo hours a week. Spring term. 

FORESTRY 

Professor Tower; Mr. Cummings. 
Fy 1. General Forestry. — The importance and scope of the subject;, 
direct and indirect value of the forest ; relation of the forest to the State ; 
relation of forestry to the other sciences, and of the individual branches 
of forestry to each other; forestry in the United States. Optional for 
students that take forestry as a major. Two hours a week. Spring 
term. 

Fy 2. Forest Botany. — A study of the morphology and functions of 
the organs of trees ; the development of the tissues of woody plants ; a 
systematic account of the trees of the United States, with special refer- 
ence to those of commercial value. Open to those that have taken BI 
21 and 22 ; to be taken in connection with course 4. Two hours a week. 
Fall term. 

Fy 3. Forest Botany. — A continuation of course 2. To be taken in 
connection with course 5. Two hours a week. Spring term. 

Fy 4. Forest Botany, Field and Laboratory Work. — Excursions ta 
identify and classify the trees and principal shrubs about Orono. Micro- 
scopic work in the study of structure and development of the organs of 
trees, t Four hours a week. Fall term. 

Fy 5. Forest Botany, Field and Laboratory Work. — A continuation 
of course 4. t Four hours a week. Spring term. 

Fy 6. Silviculture. — A study of the facts which concern forest 
growth in the relation of the tree to external influences ; characteristics 
of the forest, and of the forest vegions of the Unitd States ; systems of 
reproducing forests naturally; thinnings and improvement cuttings. To 
be taken in connection with course 8. Open to those that have taken 
courses 2, 3, 4 and 5. Two hours a zveek. Fall term. 

Fy 7. Silviculture. — A continuation of course 6. To be taken in* 
connection with course 9. Two hours a week. Spring term. 

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The University of Maine 

Fy 8. Silviculture, Field Work. — Special studies and practical work 
in the forest, t Eight hours a week the first half of the fall term. 

Fy 9. Silviculture, Field Work. — A continuation of course 8. 
t Eight hours a week, the last half of the spring term. 

Fy 10. Forest Measurements. — The determination of the contents 
of felled and standing trees and of the whole forest on a tract ; methods 
of measurement in use in the United States ; calculation of rate of 
growth; construction of volume and yield tables. To be taken in con- 
nection with course 11. Two hours a week. Fall term. Open to those 
that have taken Ms 1, 2, and 4. 

Fy 11. Forest Measurements, Field Work. — Practice in taking 
measurements, and office work in computing the results, f Four hours 
a week. Fall term. 

Fy 12. Lumbering. — The industry considered from an economic stand- 
point ; an account of the methods of lumbering in the different parts of 
the United States. In connection with this course the student is expected 
to spend two weeks in a lumber camp and prepare a written report on 
the operations of lumbering in that locality. One hour a week. Fall 
term. One-half credit is allowed for the time spent in the lumber camp 
and in preparing the report. Open to students taking forestry as a major 
subject. 

Fy 13. Forest Management. — Financial and economic considera- 
tions ; the normal forest ; principles and preparation of working plans. 
Two hours a week, the first half of the spring term. Open to those that 
have taken courses 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, and 11. 

Fy 13. Thesis Work. — The preparation of a thesis in forest manage- 
ment, t Ten hours a week. Spring term. 

GERMAN 

* Professor Lewis ; Professor Lentz ; Mr. Shute. 
Gm 1. German. — Elementary course. Lange, German Method; 
Joynes-Meissner Grammar ; Bierwirth, Elements of German ; Gerstacker, 
Germelshausen ; Campe, Robinson der Jungere ; Kraner, Wigo, and 
Jacobsen, Der Tschokoi ; Heyse, L'Arrabbiata. Five hours a week. Fall 
term. 



* Absent on leave. 

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The University of Maine 

Gm 2. German. — A continuation of course i. Five hours a week. 
Spring term. 

Gin 3a. German. — Lessing, Minna von Barnhelm ; Goethe, Hermann 
und Dorothea ; Gore, Science Reader ; Heyse, Anfang und Ende. 
Review of grammatical principles ; German composition and conversation. 

Three hours a zveek. Fall term. 

Gm 3b. German. — A continuation of course 3a. Two hours a week. 
Spring term. 

Gm 4a. German. — Schiller, Wallenstein ; Goethe, Egmont, Tasso, Iph- 
igenie; Lessing, Nathan der Weise; lectures; outside reading; themes 
in German and English upon works read; conversation. Three hours a 
week. Fall term. 

Gm 4b. German. — Goethe, Faust, Part I ; lectures, themes, reference 
readings, conversation. Three hours a week. Spring term. 

Gm 5a. German. — History of German literature. Kluge, Deutsche 
National Litteratur. Lectures, recitations, themes in English and 
German ; collateral reading. Three hours a week. Fall term. 

Gm 5b. German. — A continuation of course 5a. The extended study 
of a particular epoch. Three hours a week. Spring term. 

Gm 6a. German. — Composition and conversation. Open to students 
that have completed courses 1 and 2, or their equivalents. Two hours a 
week. Fall term. 

Gm 6b. German. — Composition and conversation. A continuation of 
course 6a. Two hours a week. Spring term. 

Gm 7a. German. — Advanced composition, rapid sight reading and 
conversation. Two hours a week. Fall term. 

Gm 7b. German. — A continuation of course 7a. Two hours a week. 
Spring term. 

GREEK 

Professor Huddilston. 
Gk 1. Xenophon. — Hellenica, Books I-IV. Study of syntax, and 
daily exercises in writing Greek. Four hours a week. Fall term. 

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The University of Maine 

Gk 2. Homer. — Odyssey, Books VI-XII. The reading of the remain- 
ing books, in English translation, is required. Assigned readings on the 
history of Greek poetry, " the Homeric question," and Homeric antiqui- 
ties. Four hours a week. Spring term. 

Gk 3. Attic Orators. — Some of the shorter orations of Demosthenes ; 
selections from the minor Attic orators ; parallel reading on the history 
of Greek prose literature, and the public economy and social life of 
Athens. Two hours a week. Fall term. 

Gk 4. Greek Tragedy. — Euripides's Medea and Sophocles's Antigone. 
The reading of several other plays in English translation is required; 
also, parallel reading on the history of the Greek tragic drama. Three 
hours a week. Spring term. 

Gk 5. Thucydides. — Book I. Assigned reading in Herodotus, and 
a comparative study of the three great historians of Greece. Three 
hours a week. Fall term. Open to students that have taken courses 1 
and 3. 

> 

Gk 6. Aristophanes. — The Clouds and the Knights; lectures and 
collateral reading on the development of Greek comedy. Two hours a 
week. Spring term. Open to students that have taken courses 2 and 4. 

Gk 7. Plato. — Selected dialogues. Lectures on the history of Greek 
philosophy with special reference to Plato and Aristotle. Two hours a 
week. Fall term. Open to students that have taken courses 3 and 5. 

Gk 8. Pindar. — The Olympian and Pythian Odes ; supplementary 
reading on the history of Greek lyric poetry. Two hours a week. 
Spring term. 

Gk 9. Greek Sculpture. — Lectures, illustrated by photographs and 
lantern slides. This course does not presuppose a knowledge of Greek, 
and is intended to serve as a general introduction to the history of the 
fine arts. The interdependence of the arts and their relation to the life 
of the Greeks, as well as their relation to the world's subsequent art, are 
emphasized. Two hours a week. Given in the fall term of odd years. 

Gk 10. Greek Sculpture. — A continuation of course 9, including a 
study of Greek architecture. Two hours a week. Given in the spring 
term of even years. 

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The University of Maine 

Gk ii. New Testament Greek. — This course is intended for those 
who have no acquaintance with ancient languages, and, with course 12, 
is expected to give considerable facility in reading the narrative portions 
of the Greek Testament. It is open to all students. Three hours a 
•week. Given in the fall term of even years. 

Gk 12. New Testament Greek. — A continuation of course 11. Read- 
ing of the Gospels of John and Matthew ; syntax. Three hours a week. 
Given in the spring term of odd years. 

Gk 13. Greek Private Life.— Lectures, illustrated with lantern slides 
and photographs. Assigned reading. Tzvo hours a week. Given in 
the fall term of even years. 

Gk 14. Greek Reeigion. — A study of the chief divinities in ancient 
Greek religion. Lectures and assigned reading. Investigation of special 
topics by members of the class. Two hours a week. Given in the spring 
term of odd years. 

Gk 15. Greek Prose Composition. — A course in writing Greek, 
intended to continue the work begun in Gk 1. One hour a week. Spring 
term. 

Gk 18. Greek Prose Composition. — An advanced course consisting 
of the translation into Greek of narrative and rhetorical passages. One 
hour a week. Fall term. 

Gk 19. Greek Prose Composition. — A continuation of course 18. 
One hour a week. Spring term. 



For the accommodation of those students who have not presented 
Greek for entrance to college the two following courses in elementary 
Greek are offered. 

Gk 20. Elementary Greek. — The declensions, conjugations; Xeno- 
phon's Anabasis, Books I-II, and daily writing of Greek based on the 
text. Five hours a week. Fall term. 

Gk 21. Xenophon and Homer. — Anabasis, Books III-IV; sight read- 
ing in Attic prose; selections from Homer's Iliad. Five hours a week. 
Spring term. 



At 1. Italian Art. — The revival of the fine arts in Italy, with special 
reference to the history of painting in Tuscany and Umbria during the 

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The University of Maine 

early Renaissance. Lectures and collateral reading. The work is 
illustrated by a large and growing collection of photographs and casts. 
One hour a week. Given in the fall term of even years. 

At 2. Italian Art. — A continuation of course I, dealing chiefly with 
the masters of the high Renaissance in Florence and Rome. One hour 
a week. Given in the spring term of odd years. 

At 3. Italian Art. — Painting in the north of Italy, and the culmina- 
tion of the Italian Renaissance in the Venetian masters. Lectures and 
collateral reading. One hour a week. Given in the fall term of odd 
years. 

At 4. Italian Art. — A continuation of course 3. One hour a week. 
Given in the spring term of even years. 

HISTORY 

Professor Fellows; Professor Colvin. 
Hy 1. History of the United States. — The period from 1750 to the 
Civil War. Formation of the constitution, and rise of political parties; 
growth of nationality ; foreign relations ; question of nullification ; con- 
flict between states and federal government ; territorial expansion ; the 
slavery struggle. Three hours a week. Alternate years. 

Hy 2. History of the United States. — A continuation of course 1. 
The constitution during the Civil War ; foreign relations and questions 
of international law ; theories, and actual process of reconstruction ; 
results of the war ; new problems. Three hours a week. Alternate 
years. Given in 1905-6. 

Hy 3. History of England. — From early times to the beginning of 
the Stuart period. Special attention is given to social and industrial 
conditions. Two hours a week. Fall term. 

Hy 4. History of England. — From the beginning of the Stuart 
period to the present. Three hours a week. Spring term. 

Hy 5. Industrial and Social History of England. — The rural 
manor, town guilds and foreign trading; Black Death and Peasants' 
Rebellion ; breaking up of the medieval system ; expansion of England ; 
industrial revolution ; government control ; extension of voluntary asso- 
ciation. For advanced students. Two hours a week. 

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The University of Maine 

Hy 6. EuRorE in the Nineteenth Century. — A general course 
emphasizing political and constitutional changes. Two hours a week. 
Given in the spring term of odd years. 

Hy 7. Medieval History. — A general course covering the period from 
395 to 1500 A. D. The disintegration of the Roman Empire; ecclesias- 
tical institutions; feudalism; struggle between the papacy and the 
empire; rise of modern nations. Required of major students in history. 
Three hours a week. Fall term. 

Hy 8. Modern History. — Continuation of Hy 7 to the present time. 
A rapid survey of the Reformation, the absolute monarchy in France, 
the French Revolution, the Napoleonic era, and Europe in the nineteenth 
century. Three hours a week. Spring term. 

Hy 9. History oe Modern Continental Europe. — The period from 
the peace of Utrecht to the fall of Napoleon I. Three hours a week. 
Fall term. Open to students that have taken courses 7 and 8. 

Hy 10. History oe Modern Continental Europe. — The period since 
the fall of Napoleon I. Tivo hours a week. Spring term. Open to 
students that have taken course 9. 

Hy 11. The Renaissance and the Reformation.— The period from 
1300 to 1648 A. D. Two hours a week. Fall term. Open to students 
that have taken courses 7 and 8. 

Hy 12. The Renaissance and the Reformation. — A continuation of 
course 11. Two hours a week. Spring term. 

Hy 13. Historical construction and criticism. One hour a week. 



HORTICULTURE 

Professor Munson ; Mr. Ernst. 
Ht 1. General Horticulture. — A discussion of the general principles 
underlying the culture of domesticated plants. Lectures. Two hours a 
week. Spring term. 

Ht 2. Principles of Fruit Growing. — A study of conditions and of 
methods of culture of orchards and small fruits. Lectures and text- 
book. Two hours a week. Fall term. 

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The University of Maine 

Ht 3. Laboratory Horticulture. — Practical work in orchard and 
gardens supplementing course 2. t Tzvo hours a zvcek. Fall term. 

Ht ■;. General and Ornamental Gardening. — The culture of garden 
vegetables in the field and under glass; market and home gardening; 
propagation of plants ; the principles of landscape art and their applica- 
tion to rural conditions ; rural school grounds and cemeteries ; plans for 
improving home grounds. Three hours a zvcek. Spring term. 

Ht 5. Handicraft. — Practical work in green-houses, gardens, and 
orchards, with familiar talks, f Four hours a zvcek. Spring term. 

Ht 6. Systematic Pomology. — Lectures and critical studies of the 
leading natural groups of fruits. Open to students that have taken Bl 
21, and Ht 2. One hour a week. Fall term. 

Ht 7. The Literature of Horticulture. — A study of the literature 
of gardens and of cultivated plants, with reviews of current periodicals. 
Open to juniors and seniors. One hour a zvcek. Spring term. 

Ht 8. The Evolution of Cultivated Plants. — The origin, distribu- 
tion, and variation of cultivated plants, and a discussion of the current 
hypotheses of organic evolution as applied to their modification ; studies 
in heredity, and the improvement of types. Open to juniors and seniors. 
Two hours a week. Fall term. 

Ht 9. — Horticultural Investigations. — Advanced work for those 
desiring to become teachers or investigators. Open to seniors or to 
graduate students. Time to be arranged. 



LATIN 

Professor Chase. 
Lt 1. Livy and Cicero. — Livy, History of Rome, selections from 
Books XXI and XXII; Cicero, De Senectute; Latin composition based 
upon the authors read. Four hours a week. Fall term. 

Lt 2. Horace. — Selections from the Satires, Epistles, Epodes and 
Odes ; classical mythology. Four hours a zvcek. Spring term. 
Courses 1 and 2 are required of freshmen in the Classical Course. 

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The LTuivetsity of Maine 

Lt 3. PlauTus and Terence. — The Captivi, Trinummus, or 
Menzechmi of Plautus ; the Andria, Adelphce, or Phormio of Terence ; 
lectures on the development of Roman comedy. Three hours a week. 
Fall term. 

Lt 4. Cicero and Tacitus.— Selected letters of Cicero, the Agricola 
and Germania of Tacitus. Three hours a week. Spring term. 

Lt 5. Pliny and Tacitus. — Selected letters of Pliny the younger; 
readings in the Annals of Tacitus ; studies in Silver Latinity. Two 
hours a week. Given in the fall term of odd years. Open to students 
that have taken courses 1-4. 

Lt 6. Roman Lyric Poetry. — Selections from Catullus, Horace, and 
the Latin hymns of the Christian church; original research. Two hours 
a week. Given in the spring term of even years. Open to students that 
have taken courses 1-4. 

Lt 7. The Roman Elegiac Poets. — Selections from Catullus, 
Tibullus, Propertius, and Ovid; original research. Two hours a week. 
Given in the fall term of even years. Open to students that have taken 
courses 1-4. 

Lt 8. The Roman Elegiac Poets. — A continuation of course 7. Two 
hours a week. Given in the spring term of odd years. 

Lt 9. Roman Satire. — Selections from Ennius, Lucilius, Varro, 
Horace, Persius, Juvenal, Petronius ; original research. Two hours a 
week. Given in the fall term of odd years. Open to students that have 
taken, or are taking, courses 5-6, or 7-8. 

Lt 10. Roman Satire. — A continuation of course 9. Two hours a 
-week. Given in the spring term of even years. 

Lt 11. Roman Philosophy. — Lucretius (selections) ; Cicero (selec- 
tions from the Academica, De Officiis, Tusculanse Disputationes, De 
Finibus, De Natura Deorum) ; Seneca (De Providentia, De Vita Beata) ; 
lectures on the history and development of ancient philosophy ; original 
research. Tzvo hours a week. Given in the fall term of even years. 
Open to students that have taken, or are taking, courses 5-6 or 7-8. 

Lt 12. Roman Philosophy. — A continuation of course 11. Two 
hours a week. Given in the spring term of odd years. 

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The University of Maine 

Lt 13. Roman Literature. — General introduction to the subject; 
illustrative class-room readings ; a choice of one of six courses of col- 
lateral reading of Roman authors. Three hours a week. Given in the 
fall term of even years. Open to students that have taken courses 1-4. 

Lt 14. Roman Literature. — A continuation of course 13. Three 
hours a zveek. Given in the spring term of odd years. 

Lt 15. Roman Rhetoric and Oratory. — Quintilian (selections from 
the Institutio Oratoria) ; Tacitus (Dialogus de Oratoribus) ; Cicero 
(selections from the Brutus, De Oratore, Orator) ; a study of sample 
orations of Cicero, and of some of the fragments of Roman oratory. 
Two hours a week. Given in the fall term of odd years. Open to 
students that have taken courses 1-4. 

Lt 16. Roman Rhetoric and Oratory. — A continuation of course 15. 
Two hours a week. Given in the spring term of even years. 

Lt 17a. Roman Topography. — Lectures on the development of the 
city of Rome and the present condition of its ancient ruins, preceded 
by a glance at the geography of the Italian peninsula. Illustrated by 
maps, photographs, and stereopticon views. One hour a week. Given 
in the fall term of odd years. Open to students that have taken 
courses 1-4. 

Lt 17b. Roman Topography. — A continuation of course 17a. One 
hour a week. Given in the spring term of even years. 

Lt 18. Roman Private Liee. — Text-book work, supplemented by col- 
lateral reading and lectures upon some of the more important and inter- 
esting customs and institutions of Roman every-day life. One hour a 
week. Given in the fall term of odd years. Open to students that have 
taken courses 1-4. 

Lt 19a. Latin Writing. — Exercises in the translation of English into 
Latin with special reference to style. One hour a week. Given in the 
fall term of even years. Open to students that have taken courses 1-4. 

Lt 19b. Latin Writing. — A continuation of course 19a. One hour 
a week. Given in the spring term of odd years. 

Lt 20. Roman Epigraphy. — The principles of the science, and the 
interpretation of selected inscriptions. One hour a week. Given in the 
spring term of even years. Open to students that have taken courses 1-4. 

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The University of Maine 

Lt 21. Rapid Reading of Latin. — Practice *iu raiding without trans- 
lation. Selections from various authors. 'Especially adapted for stu- 
dents expecting to teach the lan^ua^t . Uuc hoar a zveck. Spring term. 
Open only to students whose' major subject h Ia'hn. ' •...."' 

Lt 22a. Latin Grammar. — A discussion* of the 'fundamental principles 
of word form and syntax in the Latin language. Lectures and recita- 
tions. One hour a zveek. Given in the fall term of odd years. 

Lt 22b. Latin Grammar. — A continuation of Lt 22a. One hour a 
week. Given in the spring term of even years 



MATHEMATICS AND ASTRONOMY 

Professor Hart; Mr. Buck; Mr. Willard; Mr. Moreey. 
Ms 1. Soeid Geometry. — Solid and spherical geometry, including 
original demonstrations and the solution of numerical problems. The 
text-book is Wells's Solid Geometry. Five hours a zveek for ten zveeks. 
spring term. Required of all freshmen in the B. A. courses, and of 
those in the B. S. courses that did not offer it for admission. 

Ms 2. Algebra. — A brief review of the theory of exponents, quad- 
ratic equations, the binomial theorem, and the progressions ; indeter- 
minate equations ; logarithms, including practice in the solution of 
numerical exercises ; undetermined coefficients ; partial fractions ; expo- 
nential and logarithmic series, and the computation of logarithms; per- 
mutations and combinations ; theory of equations. The text-book is 
Downey's Higher Algebra. Five hours a zveek. Fall term, first four- 
teen weeks. 

Ms 4. Plane Trigonometry. — The text-book is Crockett's Trigo- 
nometry. Five hours a zveek. Fall term, last four weeks ; spring term, 
first eight weeks. Courses 2, 4, and either 1, 19, or 6a are required of 
all candidates for the Bachelor's degree. 

Ms 5. Analytic Geometry. — A brief study of the point, right line, 
and conic sections. For students in other than engineering courses who 
do not intend to elect mathematics beyond course 7. Open to students 
that have taken courses 2 and 4. The text-book is Wentworth's Analytic 
Geometry. Two hours a zveek. Fall term. 

Ms 6a. Analytic Geometry. — A study of the point, line, and circle. 
Open to students that have taken courses 1, 2 and 4. The text-book is 

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The University of Maine 

Ashton's Analytic Geometry., Five hours a week. Spring term, last ten 
weeks. 

Ms 6b .Analytic Oeoji^ry. — A continuation of course 6a. Conic 
sections'; elements of solid analytic geometry. Five hours a week. Fall 
term, first eight weeks,. , , , „ 

Ms 7. Calculus. — Differentiation of the elementary forms of alge- 
braic and transcendental functions ; successive differentiation ; differen- 
tials ; integration of the elementary forms ; integration between limits. 
Open to students that have taken courses 1, 2, 4, and either 5, or 6a and 
6b. The text-book is Murray's Infinitesimal Calculus. Five hours a 
week. Fall term, last ten weeks. 

Ms 8. Calculus. — A continuation of course 7. Integration as a 
summation ; various methods of integration. Applications of differential 
and integral calculus. Five hours a week. Spring term. 

Ms 9. Descriptive: Astronomy. — The text-book is supplemented by 
informal lectures, and illustrated by lantern slides, the Trouvelot draw- 
ings of celestial objects, and work in the observatory. Open to students 
that have taken courses 1, 2, 4, and, preferably, Ps 1 and Ps 5. The 
text-book is Young's Manual of Astronomy. Three hours a week. Fall 
term. 

Ms 10. Practical Astronomy. — A course arranged to meet the needs 
of engineering students, and consisting mainly of problems in the con- 
version of time, the determination of terrestrial latitudes and longitudes, 
and the establishment of meridian lines. The data for these problems 
are taken largely from the students' own observations, and the course 
is intended to emphasize the necessity of careful work in the field, as 
well as accurate and well arranged computations. The instruments 
employed are the sextant, artificial horizon, portable chronometer, theo- 
dolite, and vertical circle. Open to students that have taken courses 
9, 4, and 19. Two hours of recitations or lectures and two hours of 
observatory work a week. Spring term. 

Ms 11. Advanced Algebra. — Determinants and the solution of higher 
equations. Open to students that have taken courses 1, 2 and 4. Three 
hours a week. Spring term. 

Ms 12. Advanced Integral Calculus.— A course based upon Byerly's 
Integral Calculus. Open to students that have taken courses 6, 7 and 8. 
Three hours a week. Given in the fall term of odd years. 

74 



The University of Maine 

Ms 13. Advanced Integral Calculus. — A continuation of course 12. 
Two hours a week. Given in the spring term of even years. 

Ms 15. Differential Equations. — The text-book is Murray's Dif- 
ferential Equations. Open to students that have taken courses 7 and 8. 
Two hours a week. Given in the spring term of odd years. 

Ms 16. Practical Astronomy. — The theory and use of the sextant, 
universal instrument, transit, and equatorial. Open to students that have 
taken courses 6, 7, 8, 9, 19, and, preferably, 10. Three hours a week. 
Given in the fall term of odd years. 

•Ms 17. Practical Astronomy. — A continuation of course 16. Three 
hours a week. Given in the spring term of even years. 

Ms 19. Spherical Trigonometry. — A continuation of course 4, with 
additional problems and applications to spherical astronomy. Two hours 
a week. Fall term- 
Ms 20. Solid Analytic Geometry. — Lectures based on Smith's Solid 
Geometry. Three hours a week. Given in the fall term of even years. 



MECHANICAL ENGINEERING 

Professor Jewett; Mr. Cole; Mr. Gunn; Mr. Davee. 
Me 1. Woodwork. — A number of graded exercises in woodworking, 
designed to give the students familiarity with the tools used in modern 
woodworking practice, and also to teach him to work from dimensioned 
drawings. These exercises lead up to pattern making. The pattern 
work consists of making complete patterns and core boxes from draw- 
ings. A lecture course supplements the work in the shop. Charge for 
materials, $4.00. t Four hours a week. Fall term. 

Me 2. Forge Work. — Forging ; welding ; tool dressing. A set of lathe 
tools and cold chisels for use in machine work is made by each student. 
Charge for material, $5.00. Cost of hammer, calipers and scale, about 
$2.50. The text-book used is Bacon's Forge Practice, t Four hours a 
week. Spring term. 

Me 3. Drawing. — Reading and tracing detail drawings and penciling 
simple details. Especial attention is given to lettering, t Two hours 
a week. Fall term. 

75 



The University of Mai 



^^^ ... ** »,« «,*,; t A , wurs „ wceK sccond nme „*»£* 



a week. 



P term 1 £^ /l0Mrj a m ,^ throughout the vear /„r M.^ , 

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connection with Me s ten „er Z\ ,' I , W ° rk ls ass '8"ed in 

Me 5 being applet to^L^ wot <* "* "^ mistered for under 

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objects TCZl of T- Th ; S C ° UrSe ,S a «"*»«*» «f Me 4. Its 
selection ™ ^lf p^tio ?"*? ^ «* "*«™* to the 
eto. In connectr^h^i rrfhe1t U ^L d mf mg ^ f ^ 

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Me 9. Materials or Enginefbtnc m^u , ■ 

and the principal allovs Ji p" NEEE 1 ING — Metallurgy f lron> steel 

invested rlZt. !' yS ' C , al P :T rtles of ™"™I, discussed and 



investigated. 7W hours a week. Fall term. 

fnej types^Tfuma^ ^rT^' ?"*?. a " d distribu «°n of various 

Steam Boiler Eonomv £ / Stokm * The ' eXt - b °° k is Kent ' s 

oner economy. Two Ao«« a week. Fall term 

76 






The University of Maine 

Me ii. Steam Engineering. — The fundamental theories relating to 
the steam engine and other heat engines. The text-book is Reeve's 
Thermodynamics of Heat Engines. Three hours a week. Fall term. 

Me 12. Steam Boiler Design. — Complete design of some type of 
steam boiler, worked up in the drawing-room, t Six hours a week. Fall 
term. 

Me 13. Hydraulic Machinery.— A brief lecture course on the 
elements of hydraulics, followed by the theory and design of the turbine 
and other standard water wheels and water motors ; practical problems 
in the drawing-room on design of turbines, t Four -hours a week. Fall 
term. 

Me 14. Marine Machinery. — A course of descriptive lectures on the 
types and processes of construction of machinery commonly seen on 
steamships. Taken by students specializing in Marine Engineering. 
Two hoars a zveek. Fall term. . 

Me 15. Mechanical Laboratory. — Testing materials, lubricants, 

steam boilers and engines, gasoline engines, etc. t Three hours a week 

for juniors, spring term, t Four hours a week for seniors. Fall and 
spring terms. 

Me 16. Steam Engineering. — A continuation of course 11, indicating 
the connection between theory and practice in steam engines, steam tur- 
bines, air compressors, refrigerating machines, and gas engines. Two 
hours a week. Spring term. 

Me 17. Steam Engine Design. — Detailed design of some type of 
steam engine, accompanying course 16. t Twelve hours a week for nine 
weeks. Spring term. 

Me 18. Graphic Statics. — The principles of graphic statics and their 
application to problems of design, f Four hours a week. Spring term. 

Me 19. Marine Engineering. — The problem of ship propulsion and 
propeller design. Taken by students specializing in Marine Engineering. 
Two hours a week. Spring term. 

Me 20. Heating and Ventilation oe Buildings. — A lecture course. 
One hour a week. Spring term. 

77 



The University of Maine 

Me 21. Seminary. — General discussion of leading articles appearing 
in current engineering literature. One hour a week. Fall and spring 
terms. 

Me 22. Thesis. — The results of some original investigation or design 
presented in proper form. The subject must be submitted at, or before, 
the close of the fall term, t 1 welve hours a week for nine weeks. 
Spring term. 

MECHANICS AND DRAWING 

Professor Weston; Mr. Grover; Mr. Cole. 
Md i. Drawing. — Free-hand work in perspective and model drawing; 
lettering, t Four hours a week. Fall term. 

Md 2. Mechanical Drawing. — Instruction and practice in the care 
and use of drawing instruments, in the drawing of geometrical problems, 
and in the use of water colors. The text-book is Anthony's Mechanical 
Drawing, t Four hours a week. Spring term. 

Md 3. Descriptive Geometry. — Elementary problems; tangents, inter- 
section of planes, cylinders, cones, spheres, etc. The time is divided 
equally between the recitation room and drawing room. The text-book 
is Church's Descriptive Geometry. Two hours a week. Fall term. 

Md 4. Descriptive Geometry. — A continuation of course 3. Two 
hours a week. Spring term. 

Md 5. Mechanics. — The principles of statics; the algebraic and 
graphic solution of statical problems, including simple trusses ; exercises 
in finding the moment of inertia, and center of gravity ; the principles of 
dynamics, shearing force, and bending moment. Five hours a week. 
Fall term. 

Md 6. Mechanics. — A continuation of course 5. Five hours a week. 
Spring term. 

Md 7. Advanced Mechanics. — General principles of kinematics, 
statics, and kinetics ; the mathematical theory of elasticity ; the theory of 
the potential function, with applications to problems in gravitation, hydro- 
mechanics, etc. Two hours a week. Fall term. Elective for seniors 
whose major work is in engineering, mathematics, or physics. 

Md 8. Advanced Mechanics.— A continuation of course 8. Three- 
hours a week. Spring term. 

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The University of Maine 

MILITARY SCIENCE AND TACTICS 

Professor Symmonds. 
Mt i. Military, First Year's Course. 

(a) Practical: 

i — U. S. Infantry Drill Regulations to include the School 
of the Battalion, Advance and Rear Guards, Outposts, 
Marches and Ceremonies. 

2 — Infantry Target Practice. 

3 — Field Service Regulations. 

4 — Guard Duty. 

(b) Theoretical : 

i — U. S. Infantry Drill Regulations to include the School 

of the Company. 
2 — Manual of Guard Duty. 
3 — Field Service Regulations. 
4 — Small Arms Firing Regulations. 
Required of all students, except as provided on p. 32. Five hours, 
or the equivalent, a week, counting one credit. 

Mt 2. Military, Second Year's Course. 

(a) Practical: 

The same as course Mt 1 (a). 

(b) Theoretical : 

1 — U. S. Infantry Drill Regulations, School of the Battalion, 
Advance and Rear Guards, Outposts, Marches and Cere- 
monies. 
2 — Records and Official Papers. 
3 — Small Arms Firing Regulations. 
Open to all who have completed course 1. All will be non-commis- 
sioned officers. Five hours, or the equivalent, a week, counting one 
credit. 

Mt 3. Military, Third Year's Course. 

(a) Practical : 

Duties consistent with rank in carrying out (a) in courses 
1 and 2. 

(b) Theoretical : 

Assistant instructors over those taking course Mt 1 (b). 
Open to all who have completed course 2. All will be officers, or 
non-commissioned officers. Five hours, or the equivalent, a week, count- 
ing one credit. 

79 



The University of Maine 

Mt 4. Military, Fourth Year's Course. 

(a) Practical : 

The same as for course Mt 3 (a). 

(b) Theoretical : 

Assistant instructors over those taking course *Mt 2 (b). 
Open to all who have completed course 3. All will be officers. Five 
hours, or the equivalent, a week, counting one credit. 

PHARMACY 

Proeessor Jackman. 
Pm 1. Pharmaceutical Chemistry. — Chemical formulae; principles, 
chemical reactions ; chemical equations, with special reference to pharma- 
ceutical processes. The text-book is Prescott and Johnson's Qualitative 
Chemical Analysis. Five hours a week. Fall term. 

Pm 2. Pharmacy. — Pharmacopoeias, dispensatories, etc. ; weights and 
measures ; specific gravity ; pharmaceutical uses of heat ; pharmaceutical 
arithmetic and problems ; the chemical elements, official salts, their prep- 
arations ; organic compounds, their official preparations ; official drugs, 
their preparations ; animal preparations ; extemporaneous pharmacy ; the 
principles of dispensing, etc. The text-book is Caspari's Pharmacy. 
Five hours a week. Fall term. 

Pm 3. Laboratory Pharmacy. — Official preparations and tests. The 
operations of manufacturing pharmacy, including the preparation of 
granular and scale salts, infusions, syrups, tinctures, and other galenicals ; 
official tests of chemicals, drugs, and preparations, for identity, strength 
and adulteration ; drug assaying. The text-books are Caspari's Phar- 
macy and the U. S. Pharmacopoeia, t Twelve hours a week. Fall term. 

Pm 4.. Pharmacopoeia. — A complete review of the pharmacopoeia, 
with special reference to the chemical and pharmaceutical principles 
involved in tests and preparations. The text-books are Caspari's Phar- 
macy and the U. S. Pharmacopoeia. Five hours a week. Spring term. 

Pm 5. Inorganic Pharmacognosy. — Nomenclature; practical exer- 
cises in the identification of specimens. The text-book is the U. S. 
Pharmacopoeia. Tzvo hours a week. Fall term. 

Pm 6. Organic Pharmacognosy. — Nomenclature; habitat, etc.; prac- 
tical exercises. The text-books are the U. S. Pharmacopoeia and 
Maisch's Materia Medica. Four hours a week. Spring term. 

80 



The University of Maine 

Pm 7. Materia Medica. — Chemicals and drugs ; their nature, uses, 
classification, therapeutic action, and doses ; poisons, and antidotes. The 
text-book is Potter's Materia Medica. Three hours a week. Fall term. 

Pm 9. Pharmacy Readings. — Current pharmacy literature; research 
and reference readings; abstracting; reports, t Five hours a week. 
Spring term. 

Pm 10. Laboratory Pharmacy. — A continuation of course 3. t Five 
hours a zceek. Spring term. 

Pm 11. Prescriptions. — Critical examination of prescriptions from 
actual files, with reference to inelegance, and to physiological, pharma- 
ceutical, and chemical incompatibility; doses; methods and order of 
compounding, etc. The text-book is Ruddiman's Incompatibilities in 
Prescriptions. Three hours a week. Spring term. 

PHILOSOPHY 

Professor Fernaed. 
PI 1. Psychology. — Among the topics considered are sensation, 
structure and functions of the brain, conditions of neural activity, con- 
sciousness, attention, conception, discrimination, association, memory, 
imagination, perception, reasoning, instinct, emotions and sentiments, 
will as volition, will as choice, and will in relation to character. The 
text-book is James's Psychology (Briefer Course). Three hours a week. 
Fall term. 

PI 2. Logic. — The object of this course is to give the student a just 
appreciation of the functions of language as a means of expressing 
thought, and a familiarity with the principles of deductive and inductive 
reasoning. The student is given frequent drills in the application of 
logical principles. The text-book is Ryland's Logic. Three hours a 
week. Spring term. 

PI 3. History oe Philosophy. — The text-book is Weber's History of 
Philosophy. Three hours a zvcek. Given in the fall term of odd years. 

PI 4. Pedagogy. — The principles of psychology applied to the art of 
teaching. The order in which the several powers of the mind become 
active ; their relative activity and development at successive school 
periods. The principles and methods of teaching ; oral instruction and 
the study of books; the recitation, its objects and methods; methods of 

8l 



The University of Maine 

testing, by questions, by topics ; examinations ; psychical facts applied 
to moral training. Three hours a week. Spring term. This course 
should be preceded by course 9. 

PI 5. Comparative Psychology. — The psychology of man and of the 
higher animals compared. A study of other minds than ours with refer- 
ence to sense-experience, instinct and intelligence, association of ideas r 
memory, perception of relations, the power to reason, and the emotions. 
Two hours a week. Given in the spring term of even years. Open to 
juniors and seniors that have taken course 1. 

PI 6. Advanced Psychology. — Besides special topics in general psy- 
chology, this course is designed to include a discussion of such phenom- 
ena as sleep and dreams, the hypnotic state, thought transference, illu- 
sions and hallucinations. Tivo hours a week. Given in the spring term 
of odd years. Open to juniors and seniors that have taken course 1. 

PI 8. Experimental Psychology. — This course deals with mental 
processes from the standpoint of experimental study, and seeks to develop 
the power of introspection of these processes by modern experimental 
methods, f Two hours a week. Fall or spring term ; the same course 
is given each term. Open to students taking course 1, or that have taken 
course I, to the limit of the psychological laboratory. 

PI 9. History of Education. — Educational systems, methods, theo- 
ries, and practices of the ancient oriental and classical nations, as also 
of the nations and peoples of medieval and modern times. A comparison 
of the school systems of the more advanced nations, especially of those 
of Germany, France, England, and the United States. The history of 
education aims to develop, for present and future service, an educa- 
tional science based on the clear and definite teachings of the past. Two 
hours a week. Fall term. Open to juniors and seniors. Course 9 pre- 
cedes course 4, in Pedagogy. 

PI 10. Advanced Laboratory Psychology. — Experimental and 
research work, t Two hours a week. Spring term. Open to students 
that have taken course 8. 

PI 11. Ethics. — Theoretical and practical ethics. A lecture course. 
Two hours a week. Given in the fall term of even years. Open to 
students that have taken course 1. 



82 



The University of Maine 

PHYSICS 

Professor Stevens ; Mr. Ham ; Mr. Bearce. 
Ps i. General Physics. — Lectures on the dynamics of solids, liquids 
and gases; sound and light; experiments before the class; problems. 
Five hours a week. Fall term. Open to students that have taken Ms 4. 

Ps 2. General Physics. — A continuation of course 1 ; heat and elec- 
tricity. Five hours a week. Spring term. 

Ps 3. Elementary Physics.— A non-mathematical course, covering 
the ground of course 1. The recitations are supplemented by lectures 
and experimental demonstrations. Four hours a zveek. Spring term. 
Course in Physics. Four hours a week. Spring term. 

Ps 5. Laboratory Physics. — The subjects usually included in an 
under-graduate course. Special attention is given to the reduction of 
observations, and the tabulation of results, f Four hours a week. Spring 
term. Open to students that have taken either course 1 or course 12. 

Ps 6. Laboratory Physics. — A brief course for students that have 
taken Ps 3. t Two hours a zveek. Spring term. 

Ps 7. Optics. — Lectures in continuation of course 1, based chiefly 
upon Preston's Light and Drude's Optics. Three hours a week. Spring 
term. Open to students that have taken Ms 8. 

Ps 8. Mathematical Physics. — A course in this subject is offered 
each year. This year a course in Merriman's Least Squares is given. 
Two hours a week. Fall term. Open to students that have taken Ms 8. 

Ps 9. Mechanics and Heat. — Advanced laboratory work in continu- 
ation of course 5. f Six hours a week, or four hours a week. Fall term. 

Ps 10. Optics. — Advanced laboratory work in continuation of course 
5. t Four hours a week. Spring term. 

Ps n. Electricity and Magnetism. — Advanced laboratory work in 
continuation of course 5. The charge for this course is $2.50. f Six 
hours a week. Fall term. 

Ps 12. General Physics. — A course covering the ground of course 
1, with more attention to the experimental and historical aspects, and 

83 



The University of Maine 

less to the mathematical. The text-book is Gage's Principles of Physics. 
Five hours a week. Fall term. 

Ps 14. Theory of Electrical Instruments. — Lectures on the mathe- 
matical theory of instruments, and the methods of eliminating errors. 
One hour a week. Fall term. 

Ps 15. Special Laboratory Course. — A course open to students that 
have completed courses 9, 10 and n. A subject is assigned for original 
investigation, or the work of a published research is repeated, f Four 
hours a week. Fall term. 

Ps 16. Special Laboratory Course. — A continuation of course 15. 
t Six hours a week. 

Ps 18. Electricity and Optics. — Advanced laboratory work in con- 
tinuation of course 5. f Four hours a week. Fall term. 



ROMANCE LANGUAGES 

Professor Segall; Mr. Shute. 
Rm 1. French. — Elementary Course. Chardenal, Complete French 
Course. Frangois and Giroud, Simple French. Labiche, Voyage de M. 
Perrichon ; Moi ; La Poudre aux Yeux ; Les Petits Oiseaux; La Gram- 
maire ; La Lettre Chargee ; La Cigale chez les Fourmis ; La Cagnotte. 
Mme. Emile de Girardin, La Joie Fait Peur. About, Le Roi des Mon- 
tagnes. De Vigny, Cinq-Mars. Five hours a week. Fall term. 

Rm 2. French. — A continuation of course 1. Five hours a week. 
Spring term. 

Rm 3a. French. — For students that have taken courses 1 and 2, or 
their equivalent. Fraiser and Squair's Grammar. Loti, Pecheur d' 
Islande. Augier, Le Gendre de M. Poirier. Sandeau, Mille de la Seig- 
Here. Pailleron, Le Monde ou Ton s' ennuie. Daudet, Le Petit Chose. 
About, La Mere de la Marquise; L'Homme a l'Oreille cassee. Hugo, 
Quatre-vingt-treize ; La Chute, Balzac, Le Pere Goriot. France, Le 
Crime de Silvcstre Bonnard. Three hours a week. Fall term. 

Rm 3b. Fkk.nch. — A continuation of course 3a. Tzvo hours a zveek. 
Spring term. 

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The University of Maine 

Rm 4a. French. — Corneille, Horace. Racine, Andromaque. Moliere, 
Le Bourgeois Gentilhomme ; L'Avare ; Les Femmes Savantes ; Tartuffe ; 
Le Misanthrope. La Bruyere, Les Caracteres. Beamarchais, Le Bar- 
bier de Seville; Le Manage de Figaro. Taine, Introduction a l'Histoire 
de la Litt. Anglaise; Les Origines de la France Contemporaine 
(extracts). Hugo, Ruy-Blas. Musset, Comedies. Rostand, Cyrano de 
Bergerac. Three hours a week. Fall term. 

Rm 4b. French. — A continuation of course 4a. Three hours a week. 
Spring term. 

Rm 5a. French. — Course in Conversation and Composition. Snow 
and Lebon, Easy French. Frangois, Prose Composition, Introductory 
Course; Advanced Course. Kron-Rippmann, French Daily Life. Two 
hours a week. Fall term. 

Rm 5b. French. — A continuation of course 5a. Two hours a week. 
Spring term. 

Rm 6a. French. — The history of the literature of the nineteenth 
century. This course will be conducted entirely in French. One hour a 
week. Fall term. 

Rm 6b. French. — A continuation of course 6a. One hour a week. 
Spring term. 

Rm 9a. Spanish. — Elementary Course. Loiseaux, Grammar. Hills 
and Ford, Grammar. Matzke, First Spanish Readings. Padre Isla's 
Gil Bias. Alarcon, El Capitan Veneno. Manuel Breton de los Her- 
reros. La Independencia. Mariano Jose de Larra, Partir a Tiempo. 
Three hours a week. Fall term. 

Rm 9b. Spanish. — A continuation of course 9a. Three hours a week. 
Spring term. 

Rm 10a. Spanish. — For students that have taken course 9. Loiseaux, 
Spanish Composition. Hills and Ford, Grammar. Miguel Ramos Car- 
Hon y Vital Aza, Zaragiieta. Galdos, Marianela. Valdes, Jose, 
Echegaray, O Locura 6 Santidad. Moratin, El Si de las Ninas. Cer- 
vantes, Don Quixote. Two hours a week. Fall term. 

Rm 10b. Spanish. — A continuation of course 10a. Two hours a 
week. Spring term. 

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The University of Maine 

Rm na. Italian. — An elementary course, elective for students that 
have completed course 2. Grandgent, Italian Grammar. Bowen, First 
Italian Readings. Three hours a week. Given in the fall term of odd 
years. 

Rm lib. Italian. — A continuation of course 11a. Grandgent, Italian 
Composition. Goldoni, La Locandiera. De Amicis, Cuore. Manzoni, 
I Promessi Sposi. Three hours a zveek. Given in the spring term of 
even years. 



86 



The University of Maine 



ORGANIZATION OF THE UNIVERSITY 



The University is divided into colleges, each offering several courses 
upon related subjects. The colleges are interdependent and together 
form a unit. The organization is as follows : 
College of Arts and Sciences 

The Bachelor of Arts Courses 
The Bachelor of Science Courses 
The Summer Term 

College or Agriculture 

The Agricultural Course 
The Extension Courses 

College oe Technology 

The Chemical Course 

The Chemical Engineering Course 

The Civil Engineering Course 

The Mechanical Engineering Course 

The Electrical Engineering Course 

The Mining Engineering Course 

The Forestry Course 

College of Pharmacy 

The Pharmacy Course 

The Short Course in Pharmacy 

The Agricultural Experiment Station 
College of Law 



GENERAL STATEMENT 

The College of Arts and Sciences, the College of Agriculture, the 
College of Technology, and the College of Pharmacy offer four years' 
courses leading to the appropriate bachelor's degree. Tfiey have the 
following common requirements for graduation : 

z. English, one year, five hours a week, or the equivalent divided 
between two years. 

2. Mathematics, one year, five hours a week. 

87 



The University of Maine 

3. Science (Chemistry, Physics, Botany, or Biology), one year, five 
hours a week, of which time an important part must be occupied with 
laboratory work. 

4. Language (Greek, Latin, German, French), the equivalent of one 
year, five hours a week. A student beginning German or French must 
receive at least two credits in the subject to count it toward a degree. 

5. Military Science and Tactics, one year, five hours a week. 

The science requirement demands a year's work in some one science, 
and is not fulfilled by fractions of a year's work in two or more sciences. 
In making up the language requirement, work done in preparation for 
college may be counted, but two years' preparatory study will be reck- 
oned as one year of college work. 

Twenty-five credits (one credit is given for a recitation course that 
meets five hours a week, or for a laboratory course that meets ten hours 
a week, for one half year), are required for graduation in the College 
of Liberal Arts, and the College of Agriculture ; thirty credits are 
required for graduation in the College of Technology, and the College of 
Pharmacy. 



88 



The University of Main; 



COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 



FACULTY OF INSTRUCTION 

GEORGE EMORY FELLOWS, Ph. D., L. H. D., LL. D. 

President of the University 
JAMES STACY STEVENS, M. S. Dean and Professor of Physics 
MERRITT CALDWELL FERNALD, Ph. D., LL. D. 

Professor of Philosophy 
ALFRED BELLAMY AUBERT, M. S. Professor of Chemistry 

ALLEN ELLINGTON ROGERS, M. A. Professor of Civics 

LUCIUS HERBERT MERRILL, B. S. 

Professor of Biological Chemistry 
JAMES NORRIS HART, C. E., M. S. 

Professor of Mathematics and Astronomy 
FREMONT LINCOLN RUSSELL, B. S., V. S. Professor of Biology 
HORACE MELVYN ESTABROOKE, M. A. Professor of English 
JOHN HOMER HUDDILSTON, Ph. D. Professor of Greek 

GILMAN ARTHUR DREW, Ph. D Professor of Biology 

RALPH KNEELAND JONES, B. S. Librarian 

* ORLANDO FAULKLAND LEWIS, Ph. D. 

Professor of Germanic Languages 
CHARLES J. SYMMONDS. Professor of Military Science and Tactics 
JACOB BERNARD SEGALL, Ph. D. 

Professor of Romance Languages 
GEORGE DAVIS CHASE, Ph. D. Professor of Latin 

MAX CARL GUENTHER LENTZ. 

Acting Professor of Germanic Languages 
CAROLINE COLVIN, Ph. D. Assistant Professor of History 

GUY ANDREW THOMPSON, M. A. Assistant Professor of English 



THOMAS BUCK, B. S. Instructor in Mathematics 

HENRY MARTIN SHUTE. M. A. Instructor in Modem Languages 
MARSHALL BAXTER CUMMINGS, M. S. Instructor in Botany 
GRANT TRAIN DAVIS, B. A. Instructor in Chemistry 

HARLEY RICHARD WILLARD, M. A. Instructor in Mathematics 
RAYMOND KURTZ MORLEY, M. A. Instructor in Mathematics 



* Absent on leave. 

8 9 



The University of Maine 

MATTHEW HUME BEDFORD, Ph. D. Instructor in Chemistry 

WALTER EVERETT PRINCE, M. A. Instructor in English 

WILLIAM ROSS HAM, B. A. Instructor in Physics 



IRA MELLEN BEARCE, B. S. Tutor in Physics 

STEPHEN JOHN FARRELL. Assistant in Physical Training 

CLARA ESTELLE PATTERSON. Assistant Librarian 

RALPH LOWE SEABURY, B. S. Assistant in Chemistry 

FLORENCE BALENTINE, B. S. Assistant in Biology 

ADELBERT WELLS SPRAGUE, B. S. Assistant in English 

GENERAL INFORMATION 

The College of Arts and Sciences comprises : 
The Bachelor of Arts Courses 
The Bachelor of Science Courses 
The Summer Term 

The aim of this college is to furnish a liberal education, and to afford 
opportunity for specialization along literary, philosophical, and general 
and special scientific lines. Each student must select in some one depart- 
ment, work to be pursued three or four years, five recitations a week. 
Any one of the following departments may be chosen for major work: 
Biology (including zoology, botany, physiology, and entomology), 
chemistry, civics, English, German, Greek, history, Latin, mathematics 
and astronomy, psychology (including education), physics, Romance 
languages (including French, Spanish, and Italian). 

In many cases the selection of a major subject need not be made 
before the beginning of the sophomore year. A student may change his 
major subject with the consent of the professors in charge of the depart- 
ment which he leaves and the one which he wishes to enter ; but no 
student will be graduated who has not finished all the work required for 
graduation in some one department, no matter how much work he may 
have done in other departments. The major subject must include work 
counting not less than six, nor more than eight credits. In the case of 
departments in which less work is offered than amounts to six credits, 
this amount must be made up from such other related departments as 
the professor under whose direction the major is taken may prescribe. 
The remainder of the student's work may be selected from any 
department or departments of the University. This must be done 
with the advice of the head of the department in which the student 
has chosen his major subject, that it may bear some useful relation to 
his other work. 

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The University of Maine 

The Bachelor of Arts Courses 

Students in the College of Arts and Sciences that have met the 
entrance requirements, and have taken a year's Latin in college, are 
candidates for the degree of Bachelor of Arts. This represents the 
minimum amount of work that must be taken in the classical languages. 
Opportunity is offered the student to take special work in Greek or Latin 
or both during his course. 

Upon the completion of one year's prescribed graduate work in resi- 
dence, or two years' in absence, including the presentation of a satis- 
factory thesis and examination at the University, he receives the degree 
of Master of Arts. 

The ' Bachelor of Science Courses 
These courses are arranged for those who seek a broad general train- 
ing, based largely upon the study of some one subject as a major, with 
the remainder of the work selected from the wide range of subjects 
offered at the University. 

At graduation the student receives the degree of Bachelor of Science. 
Upon the completion of one year's prescribed work in residence, or two 
years' in absence, including the presentation of a satisfactory thesis and 
examination at the University, he receives the degree of Master of 
Science. 

No outline of the courses in the College of Arts and Sciences is given 
in the catalogue, but students may have such an outline presented to 
them by applying to the professor in charge of the department in which 
he is interested. Groups of studies may be made up which would be 
desirable for students intending to prepare for teaching, or to enter upon 
the study of law, medicine, or theology. 

The Summer Term 
faculty of instruction 
GEORGE EMORY FELLOWS, Ph. D., L. H. D., LL. D. 

President of the University 
JAMES STACY STEVENS, M. S. 

Dean in the College of Arts and Sciences. Physics 
MERRITT CALDWELL FERNALD, Ph. D., LL. D. Pedagogy 

ALFRED BELLAMY AUBERT, M. S. Chemistry 

JOHN HOMER HUDDILSTON, Ph. D. Latin 

WILLIAM DANIEL HURD, B. S. Nature Studies 

EUGENE LOUIS RAICHE, French 

JAMES PERRY WORDEN, Ph. D. German 

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The University of Maine 

ARTHUR GUY TERRY, Ph. M. History 

GUY ANDREW THOMPSON, M. A. English 

THOMAS BUCK. B. S. Mathematics 

MARSHALL BAXTER CUMMINGS, M. S. Botany 

RALPH KNEELAND JONES, B. S. Librarian 

GENERAL INFORMATION 

The summer term of the University of Maine is not a summer school, 
but so far as is practicable the work is coordinate with that of the 
remainder of the year. The majority of the courses offered are of 
college grade and, when completed, the student receives full credit on 
the University books. There are no examinations for admission, and 
students are permitted to enter any class in which they can satisfactorily 
carry on the work. Before counting this work toward a collegiate 
degree, the college entrance conditions must be met. 

Three classes of students may be benefited by the work of this term : 

1. Teachers in the high schools and grammar schools who wish to fit 

themselves for more advanced positions. A small expenditure of 
time and money in the summer vacation may be the means of 
securing a more desirable position. School superintendents are 
coming to discriminate in favor of those teachers who advance in 
their work. 

2. College students who may wish to get ahead in their course, or who 

may have back work to make up. A student should be able to 
make one credit (the equivalent of a five hours' study for eighteen 
weeks) during the summer term. 

3. Courses in physics, chemistry, and mathematics are offered covering 

the work of the high school. In this way a student who is slightly 
deficient at the end of the school year may prepare himself for 
college. These courses give no credit on the University books. 
The location of the University of Maine is an ideal one for a summer 
session. Orono is accessible either by the Maine Central or Bangor and 
Aroostook railroads, or the Bangor, Orono, and Old Town trolley line. 
The summer climate is delightful and the extensive grounds are avail- 
able for the use of the students. So far as possible the recitations are 
placed in the forenoon and the special lectures in the evening, leaving 
the afternoons free for studv and recreation. 



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The University of Maine 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 



BOTANY 

Mr. Cummings : 

i. Field Botany. This course will deal with the kinds, habits, 
and habitats of plants about the University, including short 
excursions to several outlying regions for collecting and 
identifying species in field and forest. . Attention will also 
be given to methods of pollination, modes of migration, 
association and mutual benefits of flowers and insects, and 
other factors of environment, such as light, heat, soil, water, 
gravity, and the effects of other plants. There will be a 
few lectures, some reference reading, and a small amount of 
laboratory work confined mostly to rainy days. 
2. Laboratory Botany. A course designed primarily for teachers 
and dealing with laboratory methods. Exercises will be 
given in collecting and preserving material of different kinds 
in different ways. Considerable time will be devoted to 
experimental work on the physics and physiology of plant 
life based on the phenomena of absorption and movement of 
solutions, transpiration, respiration, carbon assimilation, and 
reproduction. Attention will also be given to the teaching 
of botany in secondary schools. 

CHEMISTRY 

Professor Aubert : 

Organic Chemistry. The aliphatic series. Recitations and lec- 
tures, illustrated by specimens. Equivalent to course Ch 7 of 
the catalogue. Text-book : Remsen's Organic Chemistry. 

Chemical Preparations. The preparation and purification of 
organic and inorganic compounds. Equivalent to course Ch 12. 
Text-book: Aubert's Organic and Inorganic Preparations. 

Quantitative Analysis. Gravimetric analysis of simple compounds. 
Equivalent to Ch 16. Text-book: Appleton's Quantitative 
Chemical Analysis or Quantitative Analysis by Clowes and 
Coleman. 

Volumetric Analysis. Including acidimetry, alkalimetry, oxi- 
dimetry, iodimetry, etc. Equivalent to Ch 19 minus Assaying. 
Text-book: Schimpf's Essentials of Volumetric Analysis. 

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The University of Maine 

Toxicology and Urinalysis. A short course in the determination 
of the more common poisons and the analysis of urine. Equiva- 
lent to Ch 21. Text-book: Aubert's Urinalysis and Toxicology. 

ENGLISH 

Professor Thoaipson : 

i. English composition and Rhetoric. The work in this course 
is similar to that of the fall term of the freshman year in the 
University. It consists of the study of text-books, discus- 
sions of principles and methods, and practice in writing. 
The written work, which is based largely upon the personal 
observations and experiences of the student, is discussed 
before the class in order to give practical illustration of 
principles and methods. Teachers will obtain from this 
course a familiarity with the methods of teaching English 
composition followed in the University, and special effort 
will be made to meet their needs. The text-book used will 
be Espenshade's Composition and Rhetoric. 

2 English Prose. A study of the style and substance of selected 
writings from the works of English prose writers of the 
Nineteenth Century. Among the writers dealt with will be 
Macaulay, Carlyle, Ruskin, Newman, Matthew Arnold, and 
Stevenson. There will be frequent written reports on the 
reading assigned, the purpose of the reports being to give 
practice in writing and to encourage the student toward 
intelligent interpretation and appreciation of what he reads. 

3. English Poetry. A careful and appreciative study of selected 
poems from the writings of English poets of the early part 
of the Nineteenth Century. Among the writers dealt with 
will be Wordsworth, Coleridge, Byron, Shelley, and Keats. 
An attempt will be made to determine the characteristic 
merits of the poets studied and to show the relation of these 
poets to the time in which they lived. 

An additional course in Shakespeare (a careful reading of a few 
of the best plays) will be given, if there is sufficient demand. 

Should teachers so desire meetings will be appointed for the dis- 
cussion of problems of teaching English in the schools. 

FRENCH 

Professor Raiche: 

1. An elementary course for beginners covering the work done 
in one year in preparatory schools and in one-half year in- 
college. The books used will be: Chardenal's Complete 
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The University of Maine 

French Course. For reading and translation, " Sans 
Famille." (D. C. Heath & Co.) There will also be some 
elementary French prose composition based on the text read. 
2. A more advanced course for those who have studied French 
in college or preparatory school. The books to be used are : 
Frazer and Squair's French Grammar (D. C. Heath & Co.), 
Hugo's La Chute, Augier's Le Gendre de M. Poirier (D. C. 
Heath & Co.). 

GERMAN 

Dr. Worden : 

1. Elementary Course. Harris's German Lessons, Huss's Ger- 

man Reader, Storm's Immensee. Intended for students who 
are deficient in college entrance requirements in German. 

2. Advanced Course. Covering part of the work in reading and 

composition usually done in the second year in German. 
Lessing's Minna von Barnhelm, Harris's German Compo- 
sition. 

3. A lecture course in Germanic literature. These lectures will 

be of a popular nature and will be open to the public. 

HISTORY 

Mr. Terry: 

1. Modern England. Political and social development of Eng- 

land from the accession of the Stuarts to the reform of 1832. 

2. The Civil War and Reconstruction. The causes and effects 

of the Civil War in America, with some discussion of the 
condition of the country during the great struggle. 

3. Foreign Relations of the United States. History of United 

States diplomacy since the establishment of the Federal 
Constitution. 

LATIN 

Professor Huddieston : 

The needs of the teacher of preparatory Latin will receive special 
attention; text-books, methods, matter, and manner in prpara- 
tory teaching of classics will be handled in weekly conferences. 

The University possesses a large collection of lantern slides and 
photographs, and these as well as the other extensive aids for 
classical instruction will be at hand for the examination and use 
of students. 

1. Virgil. Reading of portions of the Aeneid with the double 
purpose of covering the ground for the needs of college 

95 



The University of Maine 

entrance requirements, and for the methods available for 
high-school teachers. Discussion of matter pertaining to 
Virgilian literature, helps for instruction, the epic style, and 
other topics that assist in making an appreciative under- 
standing of Virgil. 
2. Cicero. Selected orations, including the four against Catiline. 
Prose composition and syntax so far as time permits will 
form a feature of this course. 

MATHEMATICS 

Mr. Buck: 

Three or more of the following courses will be given, depending 

upon the number of candidates indicating their desire to elect 

them. 

i. Plane Trigonometry. The solution of right and oblique plane 

triangles, and of problems in surveying, together with the 

use of surveying instruments. No text-book will be required 

for this course, but those having logarithmic tables should 

bring them, and also any modern text-book on trigonometry, 

which will be useful for reference. 

2. Solid Geometry. This course is offered especially for the 

benefit of students who intend to enter college, but who 
have not been able to complete the requirements in solid 
geometry. Wentworth's Solid Geometry will probably be 
used as the text-book, but Philips and Fisher's, Wells's, and 
other books will be used for reference. 

3. College Algebra. The theory of quadratic equations, the 

binomial theorem and so much of the regular freshman 
course in algebra as time will permit. Text-book to be 
selected at the opening of the term. 

4. Analytic Geometry. A brief course covering the elements of 

this subject. 

NATURE STUDY 

Professor Hurd: 

At the last session of the Maine Legislature the committee on 
education recommended that " Nature Study " or " Elementary 
Agriculture " be taught in the normal schools of the State. 
In a short time this work will no doubt be required in many 
of the public schools. Recognizing the value of the subject, and 
wishing to cooperate in this movement, the University will offer 
at its summer session a course for teachers which will familiarize 
them with the principal phases of the subject and help them to 

96 



The University of Maine 

carry on such work when called upon to do so. The grounds, 
land, animals, and other equipment of the University will be 
used in an illustrative way. Briefly stated the following are 
some of the topics treated : 
Plants: 

General Structure. Function and relation of the different parts. 

Conditions necessary to plant growth. Seed selection and 

germination. How plants may be improved. Classification 

and uses of several principal plants used in the industrial world. 

Soils: 

Origin and composition. Uses. Physical and chemical charac- 
teristics. Improvement of soils. Soil exhaustion. 
Animals: 

Relation of animal life to plant life and other forms of nature. 
Importance of domestic animals in our daily life. Structure, 
food, habits, and development of our domestic animals. 
Plant Diseases, Insects, and Weeds: 

The causes, nature of and common remedies for plant diseases. 
Friendly and injurious insects and ways of controlling them. 
A study of the weeds common to the neighborhood and best 
methods of eradicating. 
School Gardens: 

A study of the school garden movement of this and other coun- 
tries. The planning, laying out, and caring for school gardens, 
putting into practice the principles studied relating to the plant 
and the soil. 
Improvement of School Grounds: 

Grading the grounds, making the lawn, selection, arrangement, 
planting, and caring for trees, shrubs, and flowers, and general 
methods of procedure. 
Nature Economics: 

A history and discussion of some of the more important crops and 
their influence on the industrial and social life of the country. 
The presentation of such topics in an interesting way to children. 

PEDAGOGY 

Professor Fernaed : 

Two courses are offered. 

i. The Principles of Pedagogy and School Management. 

2. History of Education. 
Under No. I, among the topics considered are : the principles of 

psychology applied to the art of teaching; the order in which 

the several powers of the mind become active, their develop- 

97 



The University of Maine 

ment at different school periods, and hence the order of studies 
based thereon ; the principles and methods of teaching ; the reci- 
tation, its objects and methods; testing by questions, by topics; 
school incentives; the art of governing; school administration 
and management and psychical facts applied to moral training. 
This course is designed to aid the teacher in his effort to attain 
higher efficiency in the class-room and in the practice of the 
teacher's art. 

Under No. 2, the aim is to develop, for present and future service, 
an educational science based on the clear and definite teachings 
of the past. Accordingly, the educational system, methods, 
theories, and practices of the leading historic nations are studied, 
with a view of determining what errors of the past to avoid, 
and what successful methods and practices to adopt. Finally, 
a brief comparative study is made of the school systems of the 
present more advanced nations, especially of those of Germany, 
France, England, and the United States. 

The special text-books recommended are : White's Principles of 
Pedagogy, White's School Management, and Seeley's History 
of Education, all published by the American Book Company. 

PHYSICS 

Professor Stevens : 

1. An elementary laboratory course. 

This includes the list of experiments adopted by the four 
Maine colleges for admission in Physics. 

2. Advanced course. 

Any laboratory course offered in the University may be taken 
by students in the summer term who are properly qualified. 

3. A series of experimental lectures on general physics. 

The grade of the work in this course will be determined by 
the preparation of the students electing it. 

LECTURES 

President Fellows : The Development of Modern Germany. 
Hon. W. W. Stetson, State Superintendent of Schools: 

The Lesson of the Picture. 

Some Educational Problems. 
Professor Hart: The Use of the Observatory. 
Professor Stevens : Modern Theories of Matter. 
Professor Estabrooke: Some Characteristics of Poetry. 
Librarian Jones : How to use a Library. 
Dr. Worden : Schiller. 

Longfellow and His Friend Freiligrath. 

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The University of Maine 

VESPER SERVICES 

A brief religious service is conducted each Sunday afternoon at 4.00 
P. M. in the Art Building. This consists of a song service and a brief 
address by a clergyman from Orono, Bangor, or Old Town. 

LIBRARY 

Throughout the Summer term the University library of 27,000 vol- 
umes and the reading room containing about three hundred periodicals 
and the Maine daily papers, will be open from 9.00 A. M. to 12 M., and 
from 2.00 to 5.00 P. M., daily, excepting Sunday and Saturday afternoon. 

The library privileges ordinarily accorded to University students, 
including the home use of books, will be extended to students in the 
Summer courses. 

LABORATORIES, MUSEUMS, AND OBSERVATORY 

The laboratories belonging to the departments of physics, chemistry, 
and botany will be available for use of the students. In the physical 
laboratory there is ample provision for carrying on the various courses 
from the preparatory work to that of the graduate student in the Uni- 
versity. All necessary apparatus is supplied to the student without 
charge. 

In the chemical laboratory a small charge is made to cover the cost 
of the articles used. The department is well equipped with modern 
apparatus. 

The botanical laboratory is in charge of the professor of biology. The 
student is furnished with miscroscope, specimens, and preparations for 
advanced work. 

The museum is illustrative of the rocks and fauna of Maine, and will 
be open at stated periods for the use of the students. 

The observatory contains an eight-inch telescope, vertical circle, and 
other instruments of precision. The work of the observatory will be 
explained by Professor Hart in an evening lecture. 

EXPENSES 

Tuition for the term of five weeks, covering all charges for instruc- 
tion in any number of courses that the student may elect, use of library 
and laboratories, except a small additional fee for those taking laboratory 
chemistry : 

For residents of Maine, $10.00. 

For residents of other states, $15.00. 

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The University of Maine 

Board and room in any of the University buildings, including light, 
and necessary furniture, $20.00 for the term, payable in advance. 

RECREATION 

Most of the class work will be held during the forenoon, leaving the 
afternoon and evening free for study and recreation. 

On the campus are several excellent tennis courts. The neighboring 
country affords many attractive excursions, on foot, by bicycle, carriage, 
or electric cars. Maine's famous seaside resort, Bar Harbor, is but one 
and one-half hours distant by rail, while Mount Kineo and Moosehead 
Lake are at only a slightly greater distance and easily accessible. 

Within easy riding or wheeling distance are Lakes Pushaw and Chemo, 
as well as several attractive mountains. 

IN GENERAL 

Prospective students are invited to consult Dean Stevens, who is in 
charge of the Summer session, or any of the other instructors, for fur- 
ther details regarding any of the courses, or upon any subject relating to 
the work. It is the wish of the authorities to offer such courses as will 
best appeal to the teachers and others who may desire to avail themselves 
of these privileges. 

If there should be a considerable demand for other studies than those 
named, arrangements will be made to provide for them as far as prac- 
ticable. In case the registration for any course offered falls below a cer- 
tain minimum, it may be withdrawn. The list of instructors and the 
courses outlined in this catalogue were for the summer of 1905. Unim- 
portant changes are likely to be made for the coming term. 



IOO 



The University of Maine 



THE COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE 



FACULTY OF INSTRUCTION 

GEORGE EMORY FELLOWS, Ph. D., L. H. D., LL. D. 

President of the University 
ALFRED BELLAMY AUBERT, M. S. Professor of Chemistry 

LUCIUS HERBERT MERRILL, B. S. 

Professor of -Biological Chemistry 
JAMES NORRIS HART, C. E., M. S. 

Professor of Mathematics and Astronomy 
FREMONT LINCOLN RUSSELL, B. S., V. S. Professor of Biology 
WELTON MARKS MUNSON, Ph. D. Professor of Horticulture 

HORACE MELVYN ESTABROOKE, M. A. Professor of English 
GILBERT MOTTIER GOWELL, M. S. 

Professor of Animal Industry 
GILMAN ARTHUR DREW, Ph. D Professor of Biology 

RALPH KNEELAND JONES, B. S. Librarian 

♦ORLANDO FAULKLAND LEWIS, Ph. D. 

Professor of Germanic Languages 
CHARLES J. SYMMONDS. Professor of Military Science and Tactics 
WILLIAM DANIEL HURD, B. S.' Professor of Agronomy 

JACOB BERNARD SEGALL, Ph. D. 

Professor of Romance Languages 
MAX CARL GUENTHER LENTZ. 

Acting Professor of Germanic Languages 
CHARLES PARTRIDGE WESTON, C. E., M. A. 

Assistant Professor of Mechanics and Drawing 
GUY ANDREW THOMPSON, M. A. Assistant Professor of English 



ARCHER LEWIS GROVER, B. S. Instructor in Drawing 

THOMAS BUCK, B. S. Instructor in Mathematics 
HENRY MARTIN SHUTE, M. A. Instructor in Modern Languages 

MARSHALL BAXTER CUMMINGS, M. S. Instructor in Botany 

GRANT TRAIN DAVIS, B. A. Instructor in Chemistry 

HARLEY RICHARD WILLARD, M. A. Instructor in Mathematics 

♦Absent on leave. 

IOI 



The University of Maine 

RAYMOND KURTZ MORLEY, M. A. Instructor in Mathematics 

ARTHUR WITTE GILBERT, M. S. Instructor in Agronomy 

MATTHEW HUME BEDFORD, Ph. D. Instructor in Chemistry 

WALTER EVERETT PRINCE, M. A. Instructor in English 



STEPHEN JOHN FARRELL. Assistant in Physical Training 

LAURENCE THEODORE ERNST. Assistant in Horticulture 

CLARA ESTELLE PATTERSON. Assistant Librarian 

RALPH LOWE SEABURY, B. S. Assistant in Chemistry 

FLORENCE BALENTINE, B. S. Assistant in Biology 

ADELBERT WELLS SPRAGUE, B. S. Assistant in English 

GENERAL INFORMATION 

The College of Agriculture comprises the departments of agronomy, 
animal industry, and horticulture, and includes courses in nearly all of 
the natural sciences, agricultural chemistry, biological chemistry, veter- 
inary science and bacteriology. The aim of the college is to prepare 
young men to become farmers, teachers of agriculture and sciences in 
schools and colleges, investigators of agricultural subjects in the United 
States Department of Agriculture, or experiment station workers. 
The work of instruction is organized as follows : 
The College Courses 

The Agricultural Course 

The Special Course in Agronomy, Animal Industry, and 
Horticulture 
The Extension Courses 

The School Course in Agriculture 

The Winter Courses in Agronomy, Animal Industry, and 

Horticulture 
The Short Course in Horticulture and Poultry Manage- 
ment 
The Correspondence and Lecture Courses 

The College Courses 
The college courses are designed for those who wish to follow agri- 
culture, animal husbandry, or horticulture as a business, or who purpose 
becoming teachers or investigators in related sciences. The instruction 
is arranged with a view to emphasizing fundamental principles and 
giving the student the largest amount of technical knowledge consistent 
therewith. To this end the theoretical instruction is associated with 
practical work and observation on the farm, in the orchard and garden, 

102 



The University of Maine 

and in the various laboratories of the university; but time is not con- 
sumed in merely manual operations. 

Certain studies are fundamental to all work in agricultural lines, and 
these are included among the subjects required in the four years courses. 
After these fundamental subjects are completed, the fullest latitude is 
allowed for election. Twenty-five credits are required for graduation. 

The General Course in Agronomy, Animal Industry, 
and Horticulture 
The course in Agriculture emphasizes technical training in the 
branches pertaining to general farming, stock raising, dairying, horti- 
culture, poultry industry, fruit growing, gardening, and agricultural 
chemistry. The entire agricultural equipment, including the farm, barns, 
dairy, agricultural machinery, greenhouses, orchards, gardens, college 
campus, the poultry plant, the flocks, and the herds, is used for instruc- 
tion. The following subjects are included among those offered in this 
•course, and students are advised to take them in the order given : 



Fall Term 
Subject Hours 

Ag i, Agronomy 2 

Ag 2, Agronomy f 2 1 

Eh 1, 3, English 4 

Ch 1, 3, Chemistry 3 

Bl 1, 2, Biology 3 

Dr 1, Drawing 2 

Mt 1, Military f 5 2% 



Freshman Year 

Spring Term 
Subject Hours 

An 1, Animal Industry 2 

An 2, Animal Industry f 2. ..I 

Eh 1, 4, English 4 

Ch 2, 4, Chemistry 4 

Bl 9, Biology 2 

Bl 21, 22, Botany 3 

Mt 1, Military t5 2 X / Z 



17% 



18% 



Sophomore Year 



Ag 3, Agronomy f 4 2 

An 3, Animal Industry 2 

Ch 14, Chemistry f 8 4 

Modern Language 3 

Eh 2, English 1 

Ms 2, Mathematics 5 



Ag 4, Agronomy 2 

Ht 1, Horticulture 2 

Ch 29, Chemistry 5 

Modern Language 2 

Eh 2, English 1 

Ms 1, 4, Mathematics 5 



17 



17 



103 



The University of Maine 



Junior Year 



Ag 5, Agronomy 3 

An 4, Animal Industry 2 

Ht 2, Horticulture 2 

Ht 3, Horticulture f 2 1 

Ch 30, Biological Chemistry 5 

Modern Language 3 



An 5, Animal Industry 2 

An 6, Animal Industry t 6 3. 

Ht 4, Horticulture 3 

Ht 5, Horticulture t4 2 

Modern Language 2 

Bl 15, Veterinary Science, 

Bl 17, Bacteriology 5 

Bl II, Entomology 2 



16 



19 



Ag 6, Agronomy, or 

An 7, Animal Industry, or 

Ht 6, 8, Horticulture, 3 

Elective 12 



Senior Year 

Ag 7, Agronomy, or 

An 8, Animal Industry, or 

Ht 9, Horticulture, . 2 

Elective 13 



15 



15 



The following subjects are included in a major in Agriculture: 

Ag 1 to 7 Agriculture 4 credits 

Ht 1 to 5 . . . . Horticulture 2 credits 

An 1 to 6 . . . . Animal Industry 2 credits 

Ch 30 Biological Chemistry 1 credit 

The following courses are included in a major in Horticulture : 

Ht 1 to 8 Horticulture 4 credits 

Ag 1 to 5 Agronomy 2 credits 

Ch 30 Biological Chemistry 1 credit 

Bl 21, 22, 29. .Botany I credit 

Certain other chemical and biological subjects are prerequisite to those 
named. 

The student who wishes to make Agricultural Chemistry a feature of 
his work should elect qualitative and quantitative analysis. 

At graduation the student receives the degree of Bachelor of Science. 
Upon the completion of one year's prescribed work in residence, or two 
years' in absence, including the presentation of a satisfactory thesis and 
examination at the University, he receives the degree of Master of 
Science. 



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The University of Maine 

The Special Courses in Agronomy, Horticulture and Animal 

Industry 

The Special Courses are designed for young men who cannot well 
spend four years in preparing themselves to become farmers, but who 
wish to secure special training in certain agricultural subjects. No fixed 
schedule of studies is prescribed, but students may elect along the line 
of horticulture, or dairying, or general farm crops and farm manage- 
ment. 

For admission to this course applicants must be at least eighteen years 
of age, and must have a good common school education. No formal 
entrance examinations are required, but students will be admitted, upon 
recommendation of the Dean after the professor in charge of the work 
elected shall have satisfied himself of the fitness of each candidate to 
take the studies desired. 

The annual expenses for courses of one year or more are the same as 
those of students in the four years' courses. Tuition is free. 

The Extension Courses 

The Extension Courses are designed to give in the shortest time pos- 
sible at the University, or directly in the home, the best training in the 
practical business of agriculture and horticulture, and the greatest amount 
of knowledge that can be acquired in the time allotted. The extension 
courses include : The School Course ; The Winter Course ; The Short 
Course in Horticulture and Poultry Management; The Correspondence 
and Lecture Courses. 

i 
The Two Years' School Course in Agriculture 

This is a course designed to train young men and women who wish 
to become practical farmers, farm superintendents, dairymen, or gard- 
eners, but who cannot devote time to high school or college training. 

The- same equipment is used and the same instructors give the work 
as in the four years' University course, but the work is of a more ele- 
mentary nature. All the classes are separate and distinct from the four 
year classes, and in no case will college credit be allowed for work done 
in the school course. 

There are no entrance examinations required of those who desire to 
enter the school course. Students over fifteen years of age who are pre- 
pared for advanced grammar or high school work are eligible for regis- 
tration. There is no tuition charged in this course, the only expenses 
being for incidental fees to cover cost of material used in the instruction. 
These fees are nominal. 

105 



The University of Maine 

The practical side of the work in this course is strongly emphasized 
and since students are expected to be able to " do " work and handle 
men when they have finished. Those taking this course are required to 
spend the summer vacation between the first and second years in work at 
the college, for which reasonable wages will be paid, or on some farm 
approved by the faculty. 

On completion of the course a certificate is awarded those who have 
satisfactorily done the work. 

The following is a schedule of the work as given : 

First Year 
Fall Term Spring Term 

Farm Crops and Farm Mechanics Farm Crops and Farm Mechanics 

Animal Industry Animal Industry and Dairy Work 

Orchard and Garden Garden and Orchard 

English English 
Business Arithmetic and Farm 

Accounts Veterinary Science 

Forge Work Carpentry 

Practical Work Practical Work 

Second Year 
Fall Term Spring Term 

Farm Crops and Farm Mechanics Farm Crops and Farm Mechanics 

Animal Industry Animal Industry 

Orchard and Garden Insects 

Farm Chemistry Farm Forestry 

Farm Botany Veterinary Science 

English English 

Practical Work Practical Work 



The Winter Courses 

The winter courses in Dairying and General Agriculture are designed 
for practical farmers who wish some training which will enable them to 
be better farmers, fruit growers, dairymen, or poultrymen, but who can- 
not leave the farm at other seasons of the year. These courses also help 
fit men to be managers of farm?, creameries or cheese factories. 

Special emphasis is given to dairying and if the course is pursued two 
terms and two seasons' satisfactory work is performed in a butter or 
cheese factory the student will be granted a certificate of proficiency. 
These courses begin on the Tuesday following the Christmas recess and 
continue eight weeks. 

1 06 



The University of Maine 

The subjects of farm crops, fertilizers, orcharding, gardening, dairying 
and butter making, stock breeding and feeding, poultry raising, and 
veterinary science, are treated in the most practical manner. Very few 
text books are used, and the expenses for board and room, which are the 
only other expenses, are very moderate. 

The; Short Course; in Horticulture and Poultry Management 

On the last Tuesday in March and continuing two weeks the special 
course in Horticulture and Poultry Management will be given. There 
is crowded into this short course all of the practical, helpful information 
possible. It is necessarily somewhat in the nature of an extended 
farmers' institute, and a special effort is made to outline future work for 
the students. The following subjects are taken up: Orchard Culture; 
Small Fruit Culture; Vegetable Gardening; Spraying; Insects and Plant 
Diseases ; Breeds of Poultry ; Egg Production ; Buildings and Appliances, 
Incubation, Embryology. The afternoons are devoted to work in the 
orchard and greenhouses, in pruning, grafting, setting plants, making 
hot-beds, and other practical subjects; or in the poultry houses and incu- 
bator rooms, in studying the breeding and handling of young chickens 
and growing fowl. 

This course emphasizes particularly the practical phases of the subjects 
studied. 

Correspondence and Lecture Courses 
The College of Agriculture desires to be closely associated with the 
farming interests of Maine. Whenever the work of the University will 
allow, some member of the faculty will meet with granges, field meet- 
ings, and farmers' clubs, on application from them, and talk over agricul- 
tural topics. Circulars and bulletins treating subjects of interest and 
importance will be published from time to time and will be sent free to 
•all residents of Maine who request them. 

For those who cannot spare the time to come to the University for 
instruction, a course of study to be pursued at home will be laid out. 
Frequent correspondence with members of the faculty and the reading 
of such books and other matter as may be suggested will accomplish a 
great deal in improving farming conditions and home life. Where read- 
ing clubs of ten or more are organized by granges or other organizations, 
and systematic study is being pursued, an officer of the University will 
meet with such grange or club and discuss questions that arise. The 
faculty of the college are always glad to receive letters of inquiry and 
will answer all questions to the best of their ability. 



107 



The University of Maine 



THE COLLEGE OF TECHNOLOGY 



FACULTY OF INSTRUCTION 

GEORGE EMORY FELLOWS, Ph. D., L. H. D., LL. D. 

President of the University 
ALFRED BELLAMY AUBERT, M. S. Professor of Chemistry 

LUCIUS HERBERT MERRILL, B. S. 

Professor of Biological Chemistry 
JAMES NORRIS HART, C. E., M. S. 

Professor of Mathematics and Astronomy 
FREMONT LINCOLN RUSSELL, B. S., V. S. Professor of Biology 
HORACE MELVYN ESTABROOKE, M. A. Professor of English 

JAMES STACY STEVENS, M. S. Professor of Physics 

GILMAN ARTHUR DREW, Ph. D. Professor of Biology 

RALPH KNEELAND JONES, B. S. Librarian 

* ORLANDO FAULKLAND LEWIS, Ph. D. 

Professor of Germanic Languages 
CHARLES J. SYMMONDS. 

Professor of Military Science and Tactics 
JACOB BERNARD SEGALL, Ph. D. 

Professor of Romance Languages 
HAROLD SHERBURNE BOARDMAN, C. E. 

Professor of Civil Engineering 
WALTER KIERSTED GANONG, B. Sc. 

Acting Professor of Electrical Engineering 
MAX CARL GUENTHER LENTZ. 

Acting Professor of Germanic Languages. 
ARTHUR CRAWFORD JEWETT, B. S. 

Associate Professor of Mechanical Engineering 
CHARLES PARTRIDGE WESTON, C. E., M. A. 

Assistant Professor of Mechanics and Drawing 
GUY ANDREW THOMPSON, M. A. 

Assistant Professor of English 



ARCHER LEWIS GROVER, B. S. Instructor in Drawing 

THOMAS BUCK, B. S. Instructor in Mathematics 



* Absent on leave. 

1 08 



The University of Maine 

HENRY MARTIN SHUTE, M. A. Instructor in Modern Languages 
HORACE PARLIN HAMLIN, B. S. Instructor in Civil Engineering 
MARSHALL BAXTER CUMMINGS, M. S. Instructor in Botany 
GRANT TRAIN DAVIS, B. S., Instructor in Chemistry 

ARTHUR WILLIAMS COLE, B. S. Instructor in Shop Work 

HARLEY RICHARD WILLARD, M. A. Instructor in Mathematics 
RAYMOND KURTZ MORLEY, M. A. Instructor in Mathematics 
EVERETT WILLARD DAVEE. Instructor in Wood and Iron Work 
MATTHEW HUME BEDFORD, Ph. D. Instructor in Chemistry 

HOWARD DOTY CARPENTER, M. A. 

Instructor in Electrical Engineering 
THOMAS McCHEYNE GUNN, B. S., M. A. 

Instructor in Mechanical Engineering 
WALTER EVERETT PRINCE, M. A. Instructor in English 

WILLIAM ROSS HaM, B. A. Instructor in Physics 



IRA MELLEN BEARCE, B. S. Tutor in Physics 

STEPHEN JOHN FARRELL. Assistant in Physical Training 

CLARA ESTELLE PATTERSON. Assistant Librarian 

RALPH LOWE SEABURY, B. S. Assistant in Chemistry 

FLORENCE BALENTINE, B. S. Assistant in Biology 

ADELBERT WELLS S PRAGUE, B. S. Assistant in English 

GENERAL INFORMATION 

The College of Technology provides technical instruction in chemistry 
and in various branches of engineering including forestry. The number 
of credits required for graduation in this college varies, according to the 
subject chosen as a major, from twenty-five to thirty. In such technical 
courses it is necessary to prescribe a large proportion of the work ; but 
some elective studies may be chosen in the junior and senior years. 
Under each of the courses described below is given a tabulated statement 
of the subjects pursued and the amount of work required. The college 
comprises : 

The Chemical Course 

The Chemical Engineering Course 

The Civil Engineering Course 

The Mechanical Engineering Course 

The Electrical Engineering Course 

The Mining Engineering Course 

The Forestry Course 

109 



The University of Maine 

At graduation in any of these courses the student receives the degree 
of Bachelor of Science. The diploma indicates which course has been 
completed. 

The; Chemical Course 

This course is designed for those who plan to become professional 
chemists and analysts, or teachers of chemistry. Attention is given to 
preparation for the work of the agricultural experiment stations. 

Lectures and recitations are closely associated with practical work in 
the laboratories. The student is drilled in the use of chemical apparatus, 
in accurate observation, and in careful interpretation of directions. 

Eleven credits are required for the completion of the major, and a 
total of thirty for graduation. 



Requirements for Graduation 
Freshman Year 



Fall Term 
Subject Hours 

Rm 3a, French 3 

Eh 3, English Composition and 

Rhetoric 3 

Ms 2, Algebra 5 

Ch 1, General Chemistry 2 

Ch 3, Lab. Chemistry f 2 1 

Md 1, Drawing t 4 2 

Eh 1, Public Speaking 1 

Mt 1, Military t 5 2% 



Spring Term 
Subj ect Hours 

Rm 3b, French 2 

Eh 4, English Composition and 

Rhetoric 3 

Ms 4, Trigonometry 3 

Ms 6a, Analytical Geom 2 

Ch 2, General Chemistry 3 

Ch 4, Lab. Chemistry f 2. . . .1 
Eh 1, Public Speaking... 1 
Mt 1, Military f 5 2%- 



19V2 

Sophomore Year 
Fall Term 

Gm 1, German 5 

Ps 12, General Physics 5 

Ch 5, Advanced Inorganic 
Chemistry 2 

Ch 14, Qualitative Analy- 
sis t 8 4 

Eh 2, Themes 1 

Bl 1, 2, General Biology 3 



17V2: 



Spring Term 

Gm 2, German 5 

Ps 5, Lab. Physics f 4 2 

Ch 6, Advanced Inorganic 

Chemistry 3- 

Ch 15, Qualitative Analy- 
sis f 8 4 

Eh 2, Themes 1 

Elective 2r 






IT 



IIO 



The University of Maine 
Junior Year 



Fall Term 

Gm 3a, German 3 

Ch 16, 18, Quant. Anal, f 12... 6 

Ch 7, Organic Chemistry 3 

Ch 30, Biological Chemistry. .. .5 
Elective 2 



Spring Term 

Gm 3b, German 3 

Ch 8, Organic Chemistry ... .2 
Ch 19, Volumetric Analysis 

& Assaying f 15 yV 2 

Elective 6 



19 



18% 



Senior Year 



> t 14. 



Fall Term 

Ch 12. Chemical 1 

preparations 

Ch 20, Agricultural 

Analysis 

Ch 21, Toxicology I 

Urinalysis J 

Ch 23, Organic Chemistry 3 

Ch 24a, Industrial 

Chemistry 2 

Bl 13, Geology 3 

Elective 5 



20 



Spring Term 

Ch 24b, Industrial 

Chemistry 2 

Ch 28, Dyeing. . ) 

Ch 22, Thesis. . . ! . 

CI125, Technical \ T I 5----7/2 

Analysis j 

Bl 9, Physiology 2 

Ch 13, Chemical Equa- 
tions 2 

Elective 5 

18% 



At graduation the student receives the degree of Bachelor of Science. 
Upon the completion of one year's prescribed work in residence, or two 
years' in absence, including the presentation of a satisfactory thesis and 
examination at the University, he receives the degree of Master of 
Science. 



The Chemicai, Engineering Course 
This course is especially designed for those who intend to enter 
industries that require a more or less extensive knowledge of chemistry, 
as well as of applied mathematics and some of the engineering studies, 
thus fitting them for positions as chemists or managers of manufacturing 
plants. 



Ill 



The University of Maine 



Sophomore 
Fall Term 
Subj ect Hours 

Ps i, General Physics 5 

Ch 5, Adv. Inorganic Chemistry.. 2 
Ch 14, Qualitative Analysis 

t 6 3 

Me. 3, Drawing f 2 1 

Ms 6b, Anal. Geom. (12 weeks) . .3 

Ms 7, Calculus (6 weeks) 2 

Me 7, Valve Gears 2 

Eh 2, Themes 1 



Year 

Spring Term 
Subject Hours 

Ps 2, General Physics 3 

Ps 5, Lab. Physics f 4 2 

Ch 6, Adv. Inorganic Chem- 
istry 3 

Ch 15, Qualitative Analysis 

t6 3 

Ce, Plane Surveying 2 

Ce 7, Field Work f 3 1V2 

Ms 8, Calculus 5 

Eh 2, Themes 1 



19 



20% 



Junior Year 



Fall Term 

Gm 2a, German 5 

Ch 16 and 18, Qualitative Anal- " 

ysis f 10 5 

Ch 7, Organic Chemistry 3 

Me 5, Mechanics 5 

Ee 9, Dynamos 2 



20 



Spring Term 

Gm 3b, German 5 

Ch 8, Organic Chemistry 2 

Ch 19, Volumetric Analysis and 

Assaying f 12 6 

Ce 10, Hydraulics 3 

Me 4, Kinematics 3 

Me 15, Mechanical Lab'y f 2 1 



20 



Senior 



Fall Term 
Ch 12, Chem. preparations] 



Ch 20 Agricultural Anal., if 12 6 
Ch 25, Technical Anal. . . . j 
Ch 24a, Industrial Chemistry. . .2 
Ce, Hydraulic Field Work f 3. .iVz 

Me 9, Mat. of Engineering 2 

or Metallurgy? 

Me, Steam Engineering 3 

Me 15, Mechanical Lab'y f 4 2 

Ee 10, Dynamo-Lab'y f 2 1 

Elective 2 



Year 

Spring Term 
Ch 24b, Industrial Chemistry. . .2 
Ch 25, Technical Anal 1 

Ch 20, Thesis Work. . >f 14 7 

Ch 28, Dyeing J 

Me 15, Mechanical Lab'y f 2 1 

Me 18, Structures f 4 2 

or 
Me 20, Heating and Ventila- 
tion (1) 

Me 5, Shop Work f 4 2 

Elective 3 



19% 
112 



16 or 15 



The University of Maine 



The Civil Engineering Course 

The course in Civil Engineering has been planned with the object in 
view of laying a firm foundation in the principles, both theoretical and 
practical, upon which the profession depends, so that on graduation the 
student may be fitted to apply himself at once to engineering work. 

Especial attention is given to mathematics, mechanics, drawing, and 
the care and use of engineering instruments; at the same time care is 
taken not to omit those subjects that tend to broaden the mind and form 
the basis of a liberal education. 

It is impressed upon the student that the scope of civil engineering is 
so broad that he can never expect to become expert in all its branches, 
and that on completion of his course he should obtain a position in that 
branch which seems best suited to him, such that he may begin to obtain 
experience and judgment, without which he can never become successful. 
Students are encouraged to work during the summer months in 
engineering lines. 

The methods of instruction are recitations, lectures, original problems, 
work in the testing laboratories, field practice, and designing, including 
the making of original designs and the preparation of the necessary 
drawings. Effort is made to acquaint the student with the best engi- 
neering structures, and with the standard engineering literature. 

The engineering building contains recitation rooms, designing rooms, 
testing laboratories, drawing rooms, a filing and reference room, and 
instrument rooms, and is well equipped. 

The following studies constitute the regular four years' course. It is 
seen that beginning with the junior year the student is allowed to elect 
a certain part of his work, the election being made from any department 
in the University, with the consent of the head of his department. 



Requirements for Graduation 

Freshman Year 

Fall Term Spring Term 

Subject Hours Subject Hours 

Ch i, Chemistry ...2 Ch 2, Chemistry 3 

Ch 3, Lab. Chemistry t 2 1 Ch 4, Chemistry f 2 1 

Eh 1, Public Speaking 1 Eh 1, Public Speaking 1 

Eh 3, English Composition 3 Eh 4, English Composition.. .3 

Md 1, Drawing t 4 2 Md 2, Drawing f 4 2 

113 



The University of Maine 



Freshman Year — Concluded 



Fall Term 
Subject Hours 

* Modern Language 3 

Ms 2, Algebra 5 

Mt 1, Military Drill f 5 2% 



Spring Term 
Subject Hours 
* Modern Language 2 

Ms 4, Trigonometry f 

Ms 6a, Analytic Geometry. ) 
Mt 1, Military Drill f 5 2% 



19V2 



19% 



Sophomore Year 



Fall Term 

Ce 6, Drawing f 6 3 

Eh 2, English Composition 1 

Md 3, Descriptive Geometry. . ..2 
Modern Language 3 

Ms 6b, Analytic Geom. . . ) 

Ms 7, Calculus ) 5 

Ps 1, Physics 5 



Spring Term 

Ce 1, Surveying 2 

Ce 2, Surveying (fid. wk.) f 6.. .3 
Eh 2, English Composition. ..1 
Md 4, Descriptive Geometry... 2 

Modern Language 2 

Ms 8, Calculus 5 

Ps 2, Physics 3 

Ps 5, Physics f 4 2 



19 



20 



Junior Year 



Fall Term 

Ce 3, Railroad Curves, etc 3 

Ce 4, Railroad Fid. Wk. f 6... 3 
Ce 7, Drawing 9 wks, f 6 h. .. .1V2 

Md 5, Mechanics 5 

Elective 6 



18% 



Spring Term 
Ce 7, Drawing 9 wks. f 6 h..i% 

Ce 9, Summer School 3 

Ce 10, Hydraulics 3 

Ce 19, R. R. Engineering 2 

Md 6, Mechanics 5 

Ce 21, Structures 2 

Elective 3 

19% 



* Students beginning a new language must take a five hour course the 
first year, which will complete the modern language requirements. In 
tin-, case Eh 3, English Composition, will be taken in the sophomore year. 



II 4 



The University of Maine 

Senior Year 
Fall Term Spring Term 

Ce ii, Hydraul. Fid. Wk. f 4. .. .2 Ce 13, Structures 5 

Ce 12, Structures 3 Ce 15, Designing f 15 foriowks.4 

Ce 14, Designing f 10 5 Thesis 

Ce 20, Masonry Construction 2 Elective 7 

Elective 6 

18 16 

At graduation the student receives the degree of Bachelor of Science. 
Upon the completion of one year's prescribed work in residence, or two 
years' in absence, including the presentation of a satisfactory thesis and 
examination at the University, he receives the degree of Master of Sci- 
ence. Three years after graduation, upon the presentation of a satis- 
factory thesis and proofs of professional work, he may receive the degree 
of Civil Engineer. 

The Mechanical Engineering Course 
The prescribed studies in this course are chosen with a view to give 
the student a fundamental engineering training such as shall enable him 
to enter successfully any one of the many lines of work in the field of 
mechanical engineering, and at the same time to form the basis of a 
liberal education. Therefore the required work covers a wide range of 
subjects in both technical and general work, as appears in the list given 
below. 

Thorough instruction in pure and applied mathematics, physics, and 
mechanics is given to prepare the student to deal with the problems of 
his profession. The work in drawing and descriptive geometry com- 
mences in the freshman year and continues throughout the course, 
especial attention being given to arranging, lettering, and dimensioning 
the drawing so as to conform to the best practice. 

The design, construction, and operation of steam boilers and engines 
is taught by courses in machine design, thermodynamics, fuels, valve 
gears, steam boiler design and steam engine design. Tests of steam 
boilers, steam and gas engines, etc., are made and studied during the 
senior year. Courses in surveying, hydraulics, and hydraulic machinery 
are open to the student. The production of materials used in construc- 
tion is studied and their properties verified by tests in the mechanical 
laboratories. A working knowledge of electrical machines is given by 
lectures in the class-room and practice in the laboratory. During the 
senior year an option in Marine Engineering is offered, giving an oppor- 

115 



The University of Maine 

tunity for the student to specialize in the steam engineering work 
involved in ship propulsion. 

This class-room work is supplemented by extensive courses in wood- 
work and pattern making, forging, machine tool work and foundry 
practice. 

Detailed descriptions of the subjects in the following list of required 
work may be found under "Courses of Instruction." 



Requirements for Graduation 
Freshman Year 



Fall Term 
Subject Hours 

Ch I, Chemistry 2 

Ch 3, Lab. Chemistry t 2 I 

Eh I, Public Speaking I 

Eh 3, English Composition 3 

* Modern Language 3 

Md 1, Drawing f 4 2 

Ms 2, Algebra 5 

Mt 1, Military f 5 2V2 



Spring Term 
Subject Hours 

Ch 2, Chemistry 3 

Ch 4, Lab. Chemistry f 2....1 

Eh 1, Public Speaking 1 

Eh 4, English Composition. .3 

* Modern Language 2 

Md 2, Drawing t 4 2 

Ms 4, Trigonometry 3 

Ms 6a, Analytic Geometry... 2 
Mt 1, Military fS 2% 



19% 



19% 



Sophomore Year 



Pall Term 

Eh 2, Themes 1 

Md 3, Descriptive Geometry 2 

* Modern Language 3 

Me 1, Woodwork f4 2 

Me 3, Drawing t 2 1 

Ms 6b, Analytic Geometry 3 

Ms 7, Calculus 2 

Ps I, Physics 5 



Spring Term 
Md 4, Descriptive Geometry... 2 

* Modern Language 2 

Me 2, Forge Work f 4 2 

Me 4, Kinematics t6 3 

Ms 8, Calculus 5 

Ps 2, Physics 3 

Ps 5, Lab. Physics t 4 .2 

Eh 2, Themes 1 



19 



20 



* Students beginning a new language must take a five-hour course dur- 
ing the first year. This will complete the modern language requirement. 
In this case Eh 3, English Composition, will be taken in the sophomore 
year. 

Il6 



The University of Maine 



Junior Year 



Fall Term 

Ee 9, Dynamos 3 

Md 5, Mechanics 5 

Me 5, Machine Work 
Me 6, Foundry Practice 

Me 7, Valve Gears f 4 2 

Ps 9, Lab. Physics t 4 2 

Elective 3 



t8. 



Spring Term 

Aid 6, Mechanics 

Me 5, Machine Work 



5 

1 8 A 
Me 6, Foundry Practice ? 

Ale 8a, Machine Design 3 

Me 8b, Designing t 2 1 

Me 15, Mechan. Lab. f 2 1 

Elective . .5 



19 
Senior Year 



19 



Fall Term 
Ale 9, Alaterials of Engineering. .2 
Ale 10, Fuels 2 

Me 11, Steam Engineering .3 

Ale 12, Steam Boiler Design f 6. .3 

Ale 15, Mechanical Laboratory 

U 2 

Elective 5 



Spring Term 
Me 15, Mechanical Laboratory 

n 1 

(First nine weeks) 
Me 17, Steam Engine Design 
t 12 3 

(First nine weeks) 

Me 22, Thesis 3 

Me 16, Steam Engineering 2 

Elective 8 



i/ 



17 



At graduation the student receives the degree of Bachelor of Science. 
Upon the completion of one year's prescribed work in residence, or two 
years' in absence, including the presentation of a satisfactory thesis and 
examination at the University, he receives the degree of Master of Sci- 
ence. Three years after graduation, upon the presentation of a satis- 
factory thesis and proofs of professional work, he may receive the degree 
of Mechanical Engineer. 



The Electricae Engineering Course 
This course is intended to provide a thorough preparation in the scien- 
tific principles involved in the practice of electrical engineering; to 
explain and illustrate the application of these principles to the design, 
construction, installation and running of apparatus with which the elec- 
trical engineer has to deal, and to give practice and experience in the 
care and running of the same. In addition to this purely electrical work 
the student takes up carpentry, forge work, machine work, mechanical 

117 



The University of Maine 

drawing, mathematics, physics, mechanics, steam engineering and other 
subjects allied to engineering work. The general courses, required or 
elective, include English language, logic, psychology, history, political 
economy, and constitutional law. 

The equipment for laboratory work in electrical engineering is ample 
and includes most of the standard forms of instruments and machines. 



Requirements for Graduation 
Freshman Year 
Fall Term 
Subject Hours 

Ch i, Chemistry 2 

Ch 3, Lab. Chemistry t 2 1 

Eh 1, Public Speaking 1 

Eh 3, English Composition 3 

Md 1, Drawing ~t 4 2 

* Modern Language 3 

Ms 2, Algebra 5 

Mt 1, Military f 5 2V2 



Spring Term 

Subject Hours 

Ch 2, Chemistry 3 

Ch 4, Lab. Chemistry f 2....1 

Eh 1, Public Speaking 1 

Eh 4, English Composition. ..3 

Md 2, Drawing f 4 2 

* Modern Language 2 

Ms 4, Trigonometry 3 

Ms 6a, Analytic Geometry... 2 
Mt I, Military t 5 2% 



19V2 



19% 



Sophomore Year 



Eh 2, Themes 1 

Md 3, Descriptive Geometry 2 

Me 1, Woodwork t 4 2 

Me 3, Drawing f 2 1 

Modern Language 3 

Ms 6b, Analytic Geometry 3 

Ms 7, Calculus 2 

Ps I, Physics 5 



Eh 2, Themes 1 

Md 4, Descriptive Geometry... 2 

Me 2, Forge Work f 4 2 

Me 4, Kinematics f 6 3 

Modern Language 2 

Ms 8, Calculus 5 

Ps 2, Physics 3 

Ps 5, Lab. Physics t4 2 



19 



20 



* Students beginning a new language must take a five-hour course the 
first year. This will complete the Modern Language requirement. In 
this case Eh 3, English Composition, will be taken in the sophomore 
year. 



Il8 



The University of Maine 



Junior Year 



Ee i, Electricity and Magnet- 
ism 2 

Md 5, Mechanics 5 

Me 5, Machine Work t 4 2 

Me 7, Valve Gears f4 2 

Ps 11, Electrical Meas. t6 3 

Elective 5 



Electricity and Magnet- 



Ee 2, 

ism 3 

Ee 12, Lab. Work, D. C. f2...i 

Md 6, Mechanics 5 

Me s, Machine Work t 4 2 

Me 8a, Machine Design t 3 

Elective 5 



19 



19 



Senior Year 



Ee 3, Electrical Machinery 3 

Ee 5, Design D. C. Machine f 4. .2 
Ee 7, Lab. Work, D. C. and A. C. 

t4 2 

Ee 13, Alternating Currents 3 

Me 11, Steam Engineering 3 

Elective 5 



Ee 4, Alt. Current Machin- 
ery, 5 hrs. 1st 9 wks 2V2 

Ee 6, Design A. C. Machine 
t 5 hrs. 1st 9 wks 1% 

Ee 8, Laboratory Work A. C. .5% 

Ee 14, Electrical Engineering, 
3 hrs. 2nd 9 *tfks iVa 

Elective 5 



iS 



16 



At graduation the student receives the degree of Bachelor of Science. 
Upon the completion of one year's prescribed graduate work in residence, 
or two years' in absence, including the presentation of a satisfactory 
thesis and examination at the University, he receives the degree of 
Master of Science. Three years after graduation, upon the presentation 
of a satisfactory thesis and proofs of professional work, he may receive 
the degree of Electrical Engineer. 



The Mining Engineering Course 
In the newly established department of mining engineering, the course 
of study for the first two years is identical with that in civil engineering, 
except that, during the second year, class and laboratory work in chem- 
istry takes the place of the courses in mechanical drawing, descriptive 
geometry and surveying. It is expected that more specific and advanced 
instruction in this department will be provided at an early date. 



t Me 8a may be replaced by Ce 1 and Ce 2, Plain Surveying and Field 
Work, 2 hours and f 4 hours respectively. 

II 9 



The University of Maine 



The Forestry Course 
A complete undergraduate course in forestry is arranged, which may 
serve as the basis not only of practical work in forestry, but also of a 
liberal education. A knowledge of the principles of forestry in its dif- 
ferent branches is given to the student, and some practice work is done 
in the forest. For students of agriculture this course offers work in 
silviculture which will give a training in the management of the farmer's 
woodlot. 

The instruction in this department consists of lectures, recitations, 
laboratory and field work. The woodland belonging to the University, 
together with adjacent land covered by a young forest, furnishes a field 
for the study of many forest problems. 

Requirements for Graduation 
Freshman Year 



Fall Term 
Subject Hours 

Bl i, General Biology 2 

Bl 2, Lab. Biology f 2 1 

Eh i, Public Speaking I 

Eh 3, English Composition 3 

Md 1, Drawing t4 2 

Modern Language 3 

Ms 2, Algebra 5 

Mt 1, Military t 5 2% 



Spring Term 
Subject Hours 

Bl 21, General Botany 1 

Bl 22, Lab. Botany t 4 2 

Eh 1, Public Speaking 1 

Eh 4, English Composition.. .3 
Md 2, Mechanical Drawing 

n 2 

Ms 4, Trigonometry 

Ms 6a, Anal. Geometry 5 

Modern Language 2 

Mt 1, Military t 5 2 x /z 



19% 
Sophomore Year 



i8y 2 



Bl 23, General Botany 2 

Ch 1, General Chemistry 2 

Ch 3, Lab. Chemistry t 2 1 

Eh 2, English Comp 1 

Fy 2, Forest Botany 2 

Fy 4, Lab. Forest Botany f 4. ..2 

Modern Language 3 

Ps 1, Physics 5 



Bl 27, Plant Physiology I 

Bl 28, Lab. Physiology t 2 1 

Ch 1, Plane Surveying 2 

Ch 2, Plane Surveying Field 

Work t 6 3 

Ch 2, Chemistry 3 

Ch 4, Lab. Chemistry f 2 1 

Eh 2, English Comp 1 

Fy 3, Forest Botany 2 

Fy 5, Lab. Botany 2 

Modern Language 3 



18 



I20 



19 



The University of Maine 

Junior and Senior Years 

Fy 6 and 7, Silviculture. 

Fy 8 and 9, Silviculture. 

Fy 10 and II, Forest Measurements. 

Fy 12, Lumbering and Written Report. 

Fy 13, Forest Management. 

Fy 14, Thesis in Forest Management. 

Electives as directed by the professor (sufficient to make a total of 

twenty-five credits at the end of the course). 

At graduation the student receives the degree of Bachelor of Science. 
Upon the completion of one year's prescribed graduate work in residence, 
or two years' in absence, including the presentation of a satisfactory 
thesis and examination at the University, he receives the degree of 
Master of Science. 



121 



The University of Maine 



COLLEGE OF PHARMACY 



FACULTY OF INSTRUCTION 

GEORGE EMORY FELLOWS, Ph. D., L. H. D., LL. D. 

President of the University 
ALFRED BELLAMY AUBERT, M. S. Professor of Chemistry 

LUCIUS HERBERT MERRILL, B. S. 

Professor of Biological Chemistry 
JAMES NORRIS HART, C. E., M. S. 

Professor of Mathematics and Astronomy 
FREMONT LINCOLN RUSSELL, B. S., V. S. 

Professor of Biology 
HORACE MELVYN ESTABROOKE, M. A. Professor of English 
JAMES STACY STEVENS, M. S. Professor of Physics 

GILMAN ARTHUR DREW, Ph. D. Professor of Biology 

WILBUR FISK JACKMAN, B. S., Ph. C. Professor of Pharmacy 
RALPH KNEELAND JONES, B. S. Librarian 

* ORLANDO FAULKLAND LEWIS, Ph. D. 

Professor of Germanic Languages 
CHARLES J. SYMMONDS, 

Professor of Military Science and Tactics 
JACOB BERNARD SEGALL, Ph. D. 

Professor of Romance Languages 
MAX CARL GUENTHER LENTZ 

Acting Professor of Germanic Languages 
GUY ANDREW THOMPSON, M. A. Assistant Professor of English 



THOMAS BUCK, B. S. Instructor in Mathematics 

HENRY MARTIN SHUTE, M. A. Instructor in Modern Languages 
MARSHALL BAXTER CUMMINGS, M. S. Instructor in Biology 
GRANT TRAIN DAVIS, B. A. Instructor in Chemistry 

HARLEY RICHARD WILLARD, M. A. Instructor in Mathematics 
RAYMOND KURTZ MORLEY, M. A. Instructor in Mathematics 
MATTHEW HUME BEDFORD, Ph. D. Instructor in Chemistry 



* Absent on leave. 

122 



The University of Maine 

WALTER EVERETT PRINCE, M. A. Instructor in English 

STEPHEN JOHN FARRELL Instructor in Physical Training 



CLARA ESTELLE PATTERSON Assistant Librarian 

RALPH LOWE SEABURY, B. S. Assistant in Chemistry 

FLORENCE BALENTINE, B. S. Assistant in Biology 

-ADELBERT WELLS S PRAGUE, B. S. Assistant in English 



GENERAL INFORMATION 

The College of Pharmacy comprises : 
The Pharmacy Course 
The Short Course in Pharmacy 

The Pharmacy Course 

This course is offered in response to a demand for a thorough training, 
both general and technical, for those who are to become pharmacists. 
It aims to combine a broad general culture and a thorough preparation 
along its special lines, with tne design of affording both the intellectual 
development necessary for the well rounded professional or business 
man, and the necessary technical training. To this end, it includes the 
same instruction in modern languages, civics, and the sciences, as is 
offered in other college courses. Thirty credits are required for 
graduation. 

Those who intend to fit themselves for pharmaceutical work are urged 
to consider carefully the superior advantages of this course. The grow- 
ing importance of the biological, sanitary, and medical sciences, and the 
pharmacist's relation to them, makes it increasingly necessary to his 
success that he be not only a well trained man in the technical branches, 
but an educated man in the broadest sense. 

Instruction in pharmaceutical studies is given by means of lectures, 
recitations, and tests, supplemented by work in the laboratories of 
chemistry and pharmacy. It embraces qualitative, quantitative, and 
volumetric analysis, toxicology, bacteriology, prescriptions, the prepara- 
tion of pharmaceutical compounds, and original investigations. 

The library contains valuable reference literature in chemistry and 
pharmacy, and the best chemical and pharmaceutical journals. 



I23 



The University of Maine 



Requirements for Graduation 






Fall Term 
Subject Hours 

Rm 3a, French * 3 

Eh 1, Pub. Speaking 1 

Eh 3, Eng. Composition 3 

Ch 1, Gen. Chemistry 2 

Ch 3, Lab. Chem. f 2 1 

Ms 2, Algebra 5 

Military f 5 2% 



Spring Term 
Subject Hours 

Rm 3b, French 2 

Eh 1, Pub. Speaking 1 

Eh 4, Eng. Composition 3 

Ch 2, General Chemistry 3 

Ch 4, Lab. Chem. t 2 1 

Ms 1, Solid Geom ) 

Ms 4, Trig. (10 w) J 5 

Military t 5 2% 



I7V* 



17V2 



Sophomore Year 



Rm 4a, French 3 

Ps 12, Gen. Physics 5 

Eh 2, Eng. Composition 1 

Ch 5, Inorg. Chemistry 2 

Ch 14, Qual. Anal, f 8 4 

Bl I, Gen. Biol 2 

Bl 2, Lab. Biol, f 2 1 



Rm 4b, French 3 

Ps 5, Lab. Physics f 4 2 

Eh 2, Eng. Composition 1 

Ch 6, Inorg. Chemistry 3 

Ch 15, Qual. Anal, t 8 4 

Bl 9, Physiology 2 

Bl 21, Gen. Botany 1 

Bl 22, Lab. Botany t 4 2 . 

Elective 2 



iS 



20 



Junior Year 



Ch 7, Org. Chemistry 3 

Ch 16, Quant. Anal, f 8 4 

Ch 30, Biol. Chem 5 

Bl 25, Plant Hist 1 

Bl 26, Lab. Plant Hist, f 4 2 

Pm 5, Inorg. Pharmacog 2 

Elective 3 



Ch 8, Org. Chemistry. . . . 
Ch 19, Vol. Anal, f 12... 

Ch 21, Tox. etc. t 2 

Ch 31, Chem. Eq 

Bl 17, Bacteriol. (9w) t 



2 

....6 

1 

2 

10. .2V2 



Pm 6, Org. Pharmacog 4 

Elective 2 



20 



19% 



* Students beginning German must take five hours per week for a 
year, which will complete the required work in modern language. 

124 



The University of Maine 

Senior Year 

Pm 2, Pharmacy 5 Pm 4, Pharmacopeia 5 

Pin 3, Lab. Pharm. f 12 6 Pm 9, Pharm. Reading f 5. . .2% 

Pm7, Mater. Med 3 Pm 10, Lab. Pharm. f 10 5 

Elective 4 Pm II, Prescriptions 3 

Elective 4 

18 19% 

From courses in History, Philosophy and Civics a total of at least five 
hours must be chosen. 

The number of hours required and elected need not exceed 150, or 30 
credits. 

At graduation the student receives the degree of Bachelor of Science. 
Upon the completion of one year's prescribed work in residence, or two 
years' in absence, including the presentation of a satisfactory thesis, and 
examination at the University, he receives the degree of Master of 
Science. 



The Short Course in Pharmacy 

This course, of two years, is designed for those who, for lack of time 
or for other reasons, are unable to take the course of four years. The 
more general educational studies of the full course are omitted, but as 
broad a range of subjects is offered as can be undertaken without sacri- 
fice of thoroughness in the technical work. The course corresponds, in 
general, to the usual full course of pharmacy colleges. The work 
required of the student will occupy his whole time during the college 
year of nine months, and will usually exclude work in drug stores during 
term time. The brevity of this course does not warrant extending to 
other than advanced students the privilege of electives. 



125 



The University of Maine 



Requirements for Graduation 
Freshman Year 



Fall Term 
Subject Hours 

Ch i, Gen. Chemistry 2 

Ch 14, Qual. Anal, f 16 8 

Pm 1, Pharm. Chem 5 

Pm 5, Inorg. Pharmacog 2 

Military f 5 2% 



f 10..5 



Spring 'Term 
Subject Hours 

Ch 2, Gen. Chemistry 3 

Ch 15, Qual. Anal. 1 

(9 w.) I 

Ch 19, Vol. Anal, f 

(9 w.) j 

Ch 31, Chem. Eq 2 

Bl 21, Gen. Botany 1 

Bl 22, Lab. Botany f 4 2 

Pm 6, Org. Pharmacog 4 

Military f 5 2% 



19% 



19% 



Sophomore Year 



Ch7, Org. Chem 3 

Pm 2, Pharmacy 5 

Pm 3, Lab. Pharmacy f 12 6 

Pm7, Mat. Medica 3 

BI25, Plant Hist 1 

Bl 26, Lab. Plant Hist, f 4 2 



Ch 8, Org. Chem 2 

Ch 21, Tox., etc., f 2 1 

Pm 4, Pharmacy 5 

Pm 9, Pharm. Read, f 3 1% 

Pm 10, Lab. Pharm. f 10 5 

Pm 11, Prescriptions 3 

Bl 17, Bacteriol. (9 w.) 2% 



20 



Students who complete this course in a satisfactory manner receive 
the degree of Pharmaceutical Chemist. 



126 



The University of Maine 



COLLEGE OF LAW 



FACULTY OF INSTRUCTION 

GEORGE EMORY FELLOWS, Ph. D., L. H. D., LL. D. 

President of the University 
WILLIAM EMANUEL WALZ, M. A., LL. B. 

Dean, and Professor of Law 
ALLEN ELLINGTON ROGERS, M. A. 

Professor of Constitutional Law 
EDGAR MYRICK SIMPSON, B. A. 

Assistant Professor of Real Property and Corporations 
BERTRAM LEIGH FLETCHER, LL. B. 

Instructor in Agency and Negotiable Paper 
GEORGE HENRY WORSTER, LL. B. 

Instructor in Insurance and Sales 
BARTLETT BROOKS, B. A., LL. B. Instructor in Contracts 

FOREST JOHN MARTIN, LL. B. 

Resident Lecturer on Common Law Pleading and Maine Practice 
HUGO CLARK, C. E. 

Resident Lecturer on Equity Pleading and Practice 
CHARLES HAMLIN, M. A. 

Lecturer on Bankruptcy and Federal Procedure 
LUCILIUS ALONSO EMERY, LL. D. 

Lecturer on Roman Law and Probate Law 
ANDREW PETERS WISWELL, LL. D. Lecturer on Evidence 

LOUIS CARVER SOUTHARD, LL. D. 

Lecturer on Medico-Legal Relations 
RALPH KNEELAND JONES, B. S. Librarian 

GENERAL INFORMATION 

The College of Law was opened to students in 1898. It occupies 
rooms in the Exchange Building, at the corner of State and Exchange 
streets, Bangor. In this city are held annually one term of the U. S. 
District Court, five terms of the Maine Supreme Judicial Court, one 
term of the Law Court, and daily sessions of the Municipal Court. The 
law library contains about 3,000 volumes, including the reports of the 
Supreme Court of the United Slates, Maine, New Hampshire, Vermont, 
Massachusetts, Connecticut, Ohio, and the Court of Appeals of New 

127 



The University of Maine 

York, the New York Common Law and Chancery Reports, the American 
Decisions, American Reports, American State Reports, the Complete 
Reporter System, the Lawyers' Reports Annotated, all the Law Encyclo- 
paedias, and a considerable number of text-books. 

Admission 

Graduates of any college or satisfactory preparatory school are admit- 
ted to the college as candidates for the degree of Bachelor of Laws, 
without examination. Other applicants must give satisfactory evidence 
of the necessary educational qualifications for the pursuit of the required 
course of study. These will be fixed in each case according to the rules 
of the Association of American Law Schools, of which association this 
school is a member. Attention is called to a change made in these rules 
by the Association of American Law Schools at its meeting at Narra- 
gansett Pier, R. I., in August, 1905. The following resolution was then 
passed : 

"Section one of Article VI of the Articles of Association shall be 
amended so that it will read as follows : 

"I. It shall require of all candidates for its degree at the time of 
their admission to the school, the completion of a four years' high school 
course, or such a course of preparation as would be accepted for admis- 
sion to the state university, or to the principal colleges and universities 
in the state where the law school is located ; provided, that this require- 
ment shall not take effect until September, 1907." 

Special students, not candidates for a degree, will be admitted without 
examination, and may pursue any studies for which they are prepared. 

Students from other schools, which are members of the Association 
of American Law Schools, are admitted to classes in this institution 
corresponding to classes in the schools from which they come, upon the 
production of a certificate showing the satisfactory completion of the 
prior work in such schools. 

Students from law offices otherwise qualified are admitted to advanced 
standing upon passing a satisfactory examination upon the earlier sub- 
jects of the course. 

Members of the bar of any state may be admitted to the senior class, 
without examination, as candidates for the degree of Bachelor of Laws, 
while graduate students may take one of the two courses leading to the 
degree of Master of Laws. 

Methods of Instruction 
The college is not committed exclusively to any one method of instruc- 
tion, and recognizes the great value of lectures by able men, and the 

128 



The University of Maine 

profit to be found in the use of standard text-books ; but the greatest 
stress is placed upon the study of selected cases, and most of the work 
is carried on in this way. It is believed that through the case the student 
can best come at the controlling principles of the law, and that in no 
other way can he get so vital a comprehension of them. "Through the 
case to the principle," may, perhaps, adequately indicate the standpoint of 
the school in the matter of method. 

Particular stress is placed upon the Practice Court, which is held once 
a week as a part of the work of the college, and in which every student 
is required to appear regularly. The questions of law are in all instances 
made to arise from the pleadings prepared by the students, and briefs, 
. summarizing the points involved and the authorities cited, are submitted 
to the presiding judge. 

The aim and spirit of the college are eminently practical, the purpose 
being to equip men for the everyday duties of the practicing attorney. 

Course: of Study 
The course of study covers three years, in accordance with the require- 
ments for admission to the bar in the State of Maine. The college year 
consists of thirty-two weeks, and is divided into the fall, winter, and 
spring terms, of eleven, ten, and eleven weeks respectively. 

Expenses 

The annual tuition fee is $70, §23.33 at the beginning of each term, 
payable in advance. Of this sum $10 is a library charge. The gradua- 
tion fee is $10. There are no other charges. 

Board and furnished rooms, with light and heat, may be obtained in 
the most convenient locations, at a price ranging from $3 to $7 a week. 
It is believed that expenses in this department, as well as in other depart- 
ments of the University, are lower than in any other New England 
college. 

Degrees 

At the completion of the three years' course, the degree of Bachelor 
of Laws is conferred. Upon the completion of one year's prescribed work 
in residence, or two years' in absence, including the presentation of a 
satisfactory thesis and examination at the University, the degree of 
Master of Laws is granted. 

Honors 
Two members of the senior class are each year elected to membership 
in Phi Kappa Phi ; and two members have places on the commencement 
program. 

129 



The University of Maine 

COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

Lw i. Agency. — Text-book, Huffcut's Cases on Agency. Three 
hours a week. Spring term. Mr. Fletcher. 

Lw 2. Bankruptcy. — Lectures. Two hours a week. Winter term. 
General Hamlin. 

Lw 3. Carriers. — Text-book, McClain's Cases on Carriers. One 
hour a week. Fall term. Professor Simpson. 

Lw 4. Carriers. — A continuation of course 3. Two hours a week. 
Winter term. Professor Simpson. 

Lw 5. Common Law Pleading. — Lectures. Two hours a week. 
Winter term. Mr. Martin. 

Lw 6. Common Law Pleading. — A continuation of course 5. One 
hour a week. Spring term. Mr. Martin. 

Lw 7. Conflict of Laws. — Dwyer's Cases. Three hours a week. 
Spring term. Professor Walz. 

Lw 8. Constitutional Law. — Boyd's Cases. Two hours a week. 
Winter term. Professor Rogers. 

Lw 9. Contracts. — Keener's Cases on Contracts. Four hours a 
week. Fall term. Mr. Brooks. 

Lw 10. Contracts. — A continuation of course 9. Three hours a 
week. Winter term. Mr. Brooks. 

Lw 11. Contracts. — A continuation of course 10. Two hours a 
week. Spring term. Mr. Brooks. 

Lw 12. Criminal Law. — lkale's Cases on Criminal Law. Tzvo hours 
a week. Winter term. Professor Simpson. 

Lw 13. Criminal Law. — A continuation of course 12. Three hours 
a week. Spring term. Professor Simpson. 

Lw 14. Damages. — Beale's Cases on Damages. Three hours a week. 
Winter term. Mr. Worster. 

130 



The University of Maine 

Lw 15. Domestic Relations. — Smith's Cases on Persons. Three 
hours a week. Fall term. Professor Simpson. 

Lw 16. Equity Jurisprudence. — Bispham on Equity Jurisprudence 
and Shepard's Cases on Equity. Four hours a week. Fall term. Pro- 
fessor Walz. 

Lw 17. Equity Jurisprudence. — A continuation of course 16. Three 
hours a week. Winter term. Professor Walz. 

Lw 18. Equity Pleading. — Lectures. Two hours a week. Spring 
term. Mr. Clark. 

Lw 19. Evidence. — Thayer's Cases. Four hours a week. Fall term. 
Professor Simpson. 

Lw 20. Evidence. — A continuation of course 19. Three hours a week. 
Winter term. Professor Simpson. 

Lw 21. Evidence. — Lectures. Number of hours not fixed. Winter 
term. Mr. Chief Justice Wiswell. 

Lw 22. Executors and Administrators. — Lectures. One hour a 
week. Spring term. Professor Simpson. 

Lw 23. Federal Courts. — Lectures. One hour a week. Spring term. 
Professor Walz. 

Lw 24. General Review. — Gardner's Review. One hour a week. 
Fall term. Professor Walz. 

Lw 25. General Review. — Gardner's Review. One hour a week. 
Winter term. Professor Walz. 



Lw 26. General Review. — Gardner's Review. One hour a week. 
Spring term. Professor Walz. 

Lw 27. History of Law. — Lectures. One hour a week. Fall term. 
Professor Rogers. 

Lw 28. Insurance. — Woodruff's Cases. Three hours a week. Spring 
term. Mr. Worster. 

131 



The University of Maine 

Lw 29. International Law. — Lectures. One hour a week. Fall 
term. Professor Rogers. 

Lw 30. Maine Practice. — Lectures. One hour a week. Spring 
term. Mr. Martin. 

Lw 31. Medico-Legal Relations. — Lectures. About six hours. 
Spring term. Mr. Southard. 

Lw 32. Municipal Corporations. — Smith's Cases. Three hours a 
week. Winter term. Professor Walz. 

Lw 33. Negotiable Paper. — Huffcut's Cases. Two hours a week. 
Winter term. Mr. Fletcher. 

j 

Lw 34. Negotiable Paper. — A continuation of course 33. Three 
hours a week. Spring term. Mr. Fletcher. 

Lw 35. Partnership. — Ames's Cases. Four hours a week. Spring 
term. Professor Walz. 

Lw 36. Private Corporations. — Smith's Cases. Four hours a week. 
Fall term. Professor Simpson. 

Lw 37. Private Corporations. — A continuation of course 36. Three 
hours a week. Winter term. Professor Simpson. 

Lw 38. Probate Law and Practice. — Lectures. About ten hours. 
Spring term. Mr. Justice Emery. 

Lw 39. Real Property. — Tiedeman on Real Property. Four hours 
a week. Fall term. Professor Simpson. 

Lw 40. Real Property. — A continuation of course 39. Three hours 
a week. Winter term. Professor Simpson. 

Lw 41. Real Property. — Finch's Cases on the Law of Property in 
Land. Four hours a week. Spring term. Professor Simpson. 

Lw 42. Roman Law. — Lectures. About ten hours. Spring term. 
Mr. Justice Emery. 

Lw 43. Sales. — Burdick's Cases. Two hours a week. Fall term. 
Mr. Worster. 

132 



The University of Maine 

Lw 44. Sales. — A continuation of course 43. Two hours a week. 
Winter term. Mr. Worster. 

Lw 45. Suretyship. — Ames's Cases. Tzvo hours a week. Fall term. 
Mr. Worster. 

Lw 46. Suretyship. — A continuation of course 45. Two hours a 
week. Winter term. Mr. Worster. 

Lw 47. Torts. — Ames and Smith's Cases. Four hours a week. Fall 
term. Professor Walz. 

Lw 48. Torts. — A continuation of course 47. Three hours a week. 
Winter term. Professor Walz. 

Lw 49. Torts. — A continuation of course 48. Two hours a week. 
Spring term. Professor Walz. 

Lw 50. Wiles. — Chaplin's Cases. Three hours a week. Spring 
term. Mr. Worster. 



33 



The University of Maine 



THE MAINE AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION 



FACULTY OF INVESTIGATION 

GEORGE EMORY FELLOWS, Ph. D., L. H. D., LL. D. 



CHARLES DAYTON WOODS, Sc. D. 
JAMES MONROE BARTLETT, M. S. 
LUCIUS HERBERT MERRILL, B. S. 
FREMONT LINCOLN RUSSELL, B. S 
WELTON MARKS MUNSON, Ph. D. 
GILBERT MOTTIER GOWELL, M. S. 
EDITH MARION PATCH, B. S. 
HERMAN HERBERT HANSON, B. S, 
LEWIS IRVING NURENBERG, B. S. 
BESSIE GERALDINE LEEDS, B. A. 



President of the University 

Director 

Chemistry 

Chemistry 

., V. S. Veterinary Science 

Horticulture 

Poultry Investigations 

Entomology 

Chemistry 

Chemistry 

Microscopy and Photography 



ESTABLISHMENT OF THE STATION 

The Maine Fertilizer Control and Agricultural Experiment Station, 
established by Act of the Legislature approved March 3, 1885, began its 
work in April of that year in quarters furnished by the College. After 
this Station had existed for two years, Congress passed what is known 
as the Hatch Act, establishing agricultural experiment stations in every 
state. This grant was accepted by the Maine Legislature by an Act 
approved March 16, 1887, which established the Maine Agricultural 
Experiment Station as a department of the University. The reorgan- 
ization was effected in June, 1887, but work was not begun until Feb- 
ruary 16, 1888. 

GOVERNMENT OF THE STATION 

By authority of the Trustees the affairs of the Station are considered by 
the Station Council, (see page 6) composed of the President of the 
University, three members of the Board of Trustees, the Director of 
the Station, the heads of the various departments of the Station, the 

134 



The University of Maine 

Commissioner of Agriculture, and one member each from the State 
Pomological Society, the State Grange, and the State Dairyman's Asso- 
ciation. The recommendations of the Council are referred to the Trus- 
tees for final action. The Director is the executive officer of the Station, 
and the other members of the staff have charge of the lines of work 
that naturally come under their departments. 

INCOME 

The annual income of the Station is about $23,000; $15,000 of which 
comes from the Hatch fund, $2,000 from State appropriations for food, 
seed, and feeding stuff inspections, about $3,500 from fertilizer inspection 
fees, $1,000 from the United States Department of Agriculture for 
co-operative experiments with poultry, and about $1,500 from miscel- 
laneous sources. 

THE OBJECT 

The purpose of the experiment stations is defined in the Act of Con- 
gress establishing them as follows : 

"It shall be the object and duty of said experiment stations to conduct 
original researches or verify experiments on the physiology of plants 
and animals; the diseases to which they are severally subject, with the 
remedies for the same; the chemical composition of useful plants at 
their different stages of growth ; the comparative advantages of rotative 
cropping as pursued under a varying series of crops ; the capacity of 
new plants or trees for acclimation ; the analysis of soils and water ; the 
chemical composition of manures, natural and artificial, with experiments 
designed to test their comparative effects on crops of different kinds; 
the adaptation and value of grasses and forage plants ; the composition 
and digestibility of the different kinds of food for domestic animals ; 
the scientific and economic questions involved in the production of butter 
and cheese ; and such other researches or experiments bearing directly 
on the agricultural industry of the United States as may in each case 
be deemed advisable, having due regard to the varying conditions and 
needs of the respective states or territories." 

Any resident of Maine concerned in agriculture has the right to apply 
to the Station for any assistance that comes within its province. 

EQUIPMENT 

Most of the Station offices and laboratories are in Holmes Hall, 
described on page 20. The Station also occupies space in the horti- 
cultural building and barns of the University and enjoys all needed 
facilities of the College of Agriculture. The Station is well equipped 
in laboratories and apparatus, particularly in the lines of chemical, ento- 

135 



The University of Maine 

mological, horticultural, and poultry industry investigations. Its poultry 
plant is probably the most complete of that of any experiment station in 
the country. It has extensive collections illustrating the botany and 
entomology of the State. It has a library of about 2,500 volumes, chiefly 
agricultural and biological journals, and publications of the various 
experiment stations. 

INVESTIGATIONS 

The Station continues to restrict its work to a few important lines, 
believing that it is better for the agriculture of the State to study thor- 
oughly a few problems than to spread over the whole field of agricultural 
science. It has continued to improve its facilities and segregate its work 
in such a way as to make it an effective agency for research in agri- 
culture. Prominent among the lines of investigation are studies upon 
the food of man and animals, the diseases of plants and animals, 
orchard, garden and field experiments, poultry investigations, and ento- 
mological research. Some of these are in co-operation with bureaus 
of the United States Department of Agriculture. Field experiments 
with crops and orchards are carried on, in the parts of the State where 
the crop in question is a leading industry, on private land in co-operation 
with the owners. 

INSPECTIONS 

The inspection of food, the inspection of fertilizers, the inspection of 
concentrated commercial feeding stuffs, the inspection of agricultural 
seeds, and the testing of the graduated glassware used in creameries, 
are entrusted to the Station through its director, who is responsible for 
the execution of the public laws relating to these matters. The cost of 
the fertilizer inspection is borne by a brand tax, that of the feeding stuff, 
food and seed inspections by a State appropriation, and that of chemical 
glassware by a charge for calibration. 

DISSEMINATION OF INFORMATION 

The Station publishes the account of its work in bulletin form. The 
bulletins for a year form a volume of about 225 pages and make up the 
annual report. Bulletins which contain matter of immediate value to 
practical agriculture are sent free of cost to the entire mailing list of 
the Station. On request, the name of any resident of Maine will be 
placed on the mailing list. 

Newspaper bulletins on special topics are published from time to time 
as occasion demands. These are very generally printed by the press of 
the State and the agricultural papers of the country. 

The Station has a large correspondence, chiefly with practical farmers 
in the State.' Careful attention is given to all inquiries and it is believed 
that in this way the Station is increasingly helpful to the farmer. 

136 



The University of Maine 



COMMENCEMENT 



The Commencement exercises of 1905 were as follows : 

Sunday, June II : Baccalaureate Address, by Professor Edward 
Howard Griggs. 

Monday, June 12: University Convocation, including reports of 
•departments and student enterprises, and the awarding of prizes ; Class 
Day Exercises ; President's Reception. 

Tuesday, June 13 : Phi Kappa Phi Initiation ; Meeting of the Alumni 
Association ; Reception by the various fraternities ; Alumni Luncheon ; 
Alumnae Luncheon; Phi Kappa Phi Address, by President Carroll D. 
Wright, LL. D. 

Wednesday, June 14: Commencement Exercises; Commencement 
Dinner ; Commencement Concert. 



DEGREES CONFERRED 
(The major subjects are stated in parenthesis.) 

College of Agriculture 
William Jewett Ricker, B. S. (Agriculture) Turner 

College of Arts and Sciences 

Gould Roydon Anthony, B. A. (Philosophy) Lincoln 

Florence Balentine, B. A. (Biology) Orono 

Archer Fuller Breed, B. S. (Mathematics) Lynn, Mass. 

Ernest LeRoy Dinsmore, B. A. (Philosophy) Whiting 

Henry Kingman Dow, B. A. (German) Old Town 

Robert Rutherford Drummond, B. S. (German) Bangor 

Raymond Arthur Fowles, B. A. (Philosophy) Greenville 

Brydone Ellsworth Harding, B. S. (Chemistry) Danforth 

Bartle Trott Harvey, B. S. (Biology) Orono 

Edward Knight Hilliard, B. S. (Biology) Old Town 

James Harvey McClure, B. A. (German) Bangor 

Mabel Frances Powell, B. A. (German) Orono 

Adelbert Wells Sprague. B. S. (Civics) Bangor 

Marion Barry Wentworth, B. A. (Greek) Kennebunk Beach 

137 



The University of Maine 

College: of Pharmacy 

Frank Linwood Bailey, Ph. C South Harpswell 

William Bromley Hurd, Ph. C North Berwick 

Edgar Warren Reemie, Ph. C East Machias 

College of Technology 

Curtis Eames Abbott, B. S. in Civil Engineering Locke's Mills 

Carl Howard Alden, B. S. in Mechanical Engineering Gorham 

Ralph Henry Alton, B. S. in Electrical Engineering Lynn, Mass. 

Bertram Eugene Ames, B. S. in Civil Engineering Lynn, Mass. 

George Otty Armstrong, B. S. in Electrical Engineering. .St. John, N. B, 
Herbert Walter Bachelder, B. S. in Electrical Engineering, 

East Winthrop- 

Charles Lester Bailey, B. S. in Civil Engineering Auburn 

Harry Orlando Beale, B. S. in Civil Engineering North Anson 

Harry George Blaisdell, B. S. in Civil Engineering Bangor 

Clayton Wass Bowles, B. S. in Civil Engineering Columbia Falls 

Archer Norwood Brown, B. S. in Electrical Engineering Stillwater 

Ernest Carroll Brown, B. S. in Mechanical Engineering Gorham 

George Wilmot Carle, B. S. in Civil Engineering Portland 

Byron Herbert Chatto, B. S. in Electrical Engineering East Surry 

Arthur Winfield Collins, B. S. in Civil Engineering Caribou 

Ernest Linwood Cotton, B. S. in Chemistry Cumberland Mills 

Benjamin Mosher Cowan, B. S. in Electrical Engineering. .. .Biddeford' 

Harry Davis Cowles, B. S. in Chemistry Athol, Mass. 

Fiancis Thenholm Crowe, B. S. in Civil Engineering, 

St. Hyacinthe, Que. 
Joseph Wilkinson Crowe, B. S. in Electrical Engineering, 

St. Hyacinthe, Que. 

Frank Leroy Flanders, B. S. in Civil Engineering Howard, R. I. 

Howard Colburn Foss, B. S. in Electrical Engineering. .. .Boston, Mass. 

Charles Leon Foubert, B. S. in Chemistry Danbury, Conn. 

Prentiss Edwin French, B. S. in Mechanical Engineering Turner 

Edward Charles Gulliver, B. S. in Civil Engineering Portland 

Clarence Burr Harlow, B. S. in Electrical Engineering Brewer 

Ralph Webster Haskell, B. S. in Mechanical Engineering Westbrook 

Andrew Jenkins Hayes, B. S. in Civil Engineering Oxford 

Roy Edwin Higgins, B. S. in Electrical Engineering Brewer 

Horace Alden Hilton, B. S. in Civil Engineering Bangor 

Leonard Otis Hopkins, B. S. in Civil Engineering, 

South Framingham, Mass. 

138 



The University of Maine 

George Kemp Huntington, B. S. in Electrical Engineering. .Lynn, Mass. 

Leslie Ingalls Johnston, B. S. in Civil Engineering Milford 

Frank Everett Leonard, B. S. in Electrical Engineering Waterville 

John Augustine McDermott, B. S. in Mechanical Engineering. .Biddeford 
William Samuel Maddocks, B. S. in Electrical Engineering. .. .Old Town 

Lloyd Arthur Martin, B. S. in Civil Engineering Old Town 

John May, B. S. in Electrical Engineering Rockland 

Lester Hale Mitchell, B. S. in Civil Engineering West Newfield 

Clare Joseph Moody, B. S. in Civil Engineering Winterport 

Percival Ray Moody, B. S. in Electrical Engineering Biddeford 

Charles Weston Pennell, B. S. in Civil Engineering Gray 

Elmer George Rogers, B. S. in Civil Engineering. Bowdoinham 

Freeman Marston Sampson, B. S. in Chemistry Gorham 

Roy Granville Sands, B. S. in Electrical Engineering Foxcroft 

Ralph Lowe Seabury, B. S. in Chemistry Yarmouth 

Walter Jefferson Shaw, B. S. in Electrical Engineering Orono 

Carl David Smith, B. S. in Mechanical Engineering Skowhegan 

D wight Freeman Smith, B. S. in Mechanical Engineering. .. .Skowhegan 

Roy Martin Snell, B, S. in Civil Engineering Lagrange 

Howard Arthur Stanley, B. S. in Electrical Engineering. .Beverly, Mass. 
Calvin Arthur Sweet, B. S. in Electrical Engineering. .. .South Atkinson 
Ernest Osgood Sweetser, B. S. in Civil Engineering. .Cumberland Center 

Fred William Talbot, B. S. in Civil Engineering Andover 

Roy Edmund Taylor, B. S. in Electrical Engineering Springvale 

Henry David Thoreau Thatcher, B. S. in Civil Engineering Dexter 

Burton Merrill Thomas, B. S. in Electrical Engineering Portland 

Herbert Arthur Thomas, B. S. in Civil Engineering Andover 

Lucian Alvah Thomas, B. S. in Electrical Engineering Rockland 

Edward Calder Thomes, B. S. in Civil Engineering Portland 

Ernest Eugene Trafton, B. S. in Electrical Engineering Auburn 

Oland Wilbur Trask, B. S. in Civil Engineering Woodfords 

Carl Wellington Weeks, B. S. in Electrical Engineering Masardis 

Alphonso White, B. S. in Mechanical Engineering North Sebago 

Frank Osmond White, B. S. in Civil Engineering Orono 

Arthur Craig Whittier, B. S. in Chemistry Farmington 

Alphonso Wood, B. S. in Civil Engineering Belfast 



Coi,i,eg£ of Law 

Ansel Harrison Bridges, LL. B Easton 

Leon Gilman Carleton Brown, LL. B Milo 

Royal Weaver Brown, LL. B Boyd Lake 

Adolphus Stanley Crawford, LL. B Old Town 

139 



The University of Maine 

Waldo Trevor Davis, LL. B Clinton, Mass. 

Joseph Henry Doyle, LL. B Franklin 

Walter Herbert Foster, LL. B Dorchester, Mass. 

Herbert Nelson Gardner, LL. B Patten 

William Asbury Johnson, LL. B Milo 

Orman Leroy Keyes, LL. B Stetson 

Arthur Blaine Lancaster, LL. B Gardiner 

Daniel Joseph Linehan, LL. B Bradford, Mass. 

Neil Vincent MacLean, LL. B Bangor 

Lewis Stillman Record, LL. B Worcester, Mass. 

Curville Charles Robinson, LL. B East Machias 

Charles Tobias Smalley, LL. B Rockland 

Erastus Lewis Wall, LL. B Bangor 

Joseph Towne Winslow, LL. B New Bedford, Mass. 

George Henry Worster, LL. B Bangor 



ADVANCED DEGREES 

Master of Arts 
DeForest Henry Perkins, B. Ph. (1900) (History) Skowhegan 

Master oe Science 
Everett Harlow Bowen, B. A. (Colgate, 1903) (Physics), 

Lowville, N. Y. 
LeRoy Harris Harvey, B. S. (iqoi) (Biology) Yankton, S. Dak. 

Master oe Laws 

Thomas Reardon Geary, LL. B. ( 1903) Bangof 

Harold Dudley Greeley, LL. B. (New York University, 1903), 

Cambridge, Mass. 
Clarence Ashton Wood, LL. B. (American University, 1903), 

Syracuse, N. Y. 

Civil Engineer 
Edward Henry Cowan, B. C. E. (1894) Marion, Ohio 

Mechanical Engineer 
Harold Wilder Mansfield, B. S. in Mechanical Engineering (1902), 

Schenectady, N. Y 
Stephen Edward Woodbury, B. S. in Mechanical Engineering (1901) 

Beverly, Mass. 

140 



The University of Maine 

Electrical Engineer 
Clinton Nathan Rackliffe, B. S. in Electrical Engineering (1902), 

Schenectady, N. Y 
Stephen Edward Woodbury, B. S. in Electrical Engineering (1901), 

Beverly, Mass. 

HONORARY DEGREES 
Doctor of Laws 

Governor William Titcomb Cobb. 
Ex-Governor Charles Brantley Aycock. 

Doctor oe Humanities 
Professor Edward Howard Griggs. 

Doctor oe Science 
Director Charles Dayton Woods. 



PRIZES AWARDED 

The various prizes were awarded last year as follows : 

The Kidder Scholarship, to Lincoln Hall Hodgkins, Bunker Hill. 

The Western Alumni Association Scholarship, to Mildred Chase, 
Bluehill. 

The New York Alumni Association Scholarship, to Albert Prentiss 
Rounds, Bridgton. 

The Boston Alumni Association Scholarship, to Joanna Carver Col- 
cord, Searsport. 

The Junior Exhibition Prize, to Joanna Carver Colcord, Searsport. 

The Sophomore Declamation Prize, to Reginald Elton Robinson, 
Oxford. 

The Franklin Danforth Prize, to William Jewett Ricker, Turner. 

The Walter Balentine Prize, to Thomas Harold Reynolds, Eastport. 

The Libby Prize, to William Jewett Ricker, Turner. 



141 



The University of Maine 



APPOINTMENTS 



Speakers at Commencement, June, 1905 
Herbert Walter Bachelder, East Winthrop ; Adolphus Stanley Craw- 
ford, Old Town; Ernest LeRoy Dinsmore, Whiting; Henry Kingman 
Dow, Old Town ; Robert Rutherford Drummond, Bangor ; George Kemp 
Huntington, Lynn, Mass. ; Howard Arthur Stanley, Beverly, Mass. ; 
Joseph Towne Winslow, New Bedford, Mass. 

Speakers at the Junior Exhibition, June, 1905 
Albert Jared Butterworth, Southbridge, Mass.; Charks William Camp- 
bell, Ellsworth; Joanna Carver Colcord, Searsport; Harry Alvah Emery, 
North Anson; Philip Holden Glover, Harrington; George Herbert Hill, 
Saco ; Raymond Brown Kittridge, Beverly, Mass. ; Edward Arthur Stan- 
ford, Lovell. 

Speakers ar the Sophomore Prize Declamation Contest, 
December, 1904 

Marion Balentme, Orono ; Lucius Dwelley Barrows, Foxcroft; Joe 
Kinsman Goodrich, Skowhegan ; Stanley Tyng Hilliard, Old Town ; 
Wilbury Owen Hutchins, Orland; Earle Walter Philbrook, Milan, 
N. H. ; Reginald Elton Robinson, Oxford ; Howard Carlton Stetson, 
Auburn. 

Members oe the Phi Kappa Phi 

Florence Balentine, Orono ; Ernest LeRoy Dinsmore, Whiting ; Henry 
Kingman Dow, Old Town; Robert Rutherford Drummond, Bangor; 
Adolphus Stanley Crawford, Old Town ; George Kemp Huntington, 
Lynn, Mass. ; Adelbert Wells Sprague, Bangor ; Howard Arthur Stan- 
ley, Beverly, Mass. ; Lucian Alvah Thomas, Rockland ; Carl Wellington 
Weeks, Masardis ; Frank Osmond White, Orono ; Joseph Towne Wins- 
low, New Bedford, Mass. 

Seniors Receiving General Honors 
Gould Roydon Anthony, Lincoln; Herbert Walter Bachelder, East 
Winthrop; Florence Balentine, Orono; Ernest LeRoy Dinsmore, Whit- 
ing; Henry Kingman Dow, Old Town; Robert Rutherford Drummond, 
Bangor; George Kemp Huntington, Lynn, Mass.; Carl David Smith, 

142 



The University of Maine 

Skowhegan; Adelbert Wells Sprague, Bangor; Howard Arthur Stanley, 
Beverly, Mass. ; Lucian Alvah Thomas, Rockland ; Carl Wellington 
Weeks, Masardis ; Frank Osmond White, Orono. 

From the College of Law 
Adolphus Stanley Crawford, Old Town; Joseph Towne Winslow, 
New Bedford, Mass. 

Seniors Receiving Special Honors 
Florence Balentine, Orono, in Biology. 
Henry Kingman Dow, Old Town, in German. 
Robert Rutherford Drummond, Bangor, in German. 

Honorable Mention in the College of Law 
Walter Herbert Foster, Dorchester, Mass. 
Leon Gilman Carleton Brown, Milo. 

Certificates in the School of Agriculture 
Herbert Barton Bailey, Biddeford. 
Hedley Chapman Black, Winthrop. 
Mark Harlan Wakefield, Biddeford. 

Reported to the Secretary of War for Publication in the Next 
United States Army Register as the Three Most Distinguished 
Students in the Military Department 

George Wilmot Carle, Portland, Maine. ' 

James Harvey McClure, Bangor, Maine. 

Calvin Arthur Sweet, South Atkinson, Maine. 

Repored to the Adjutant General of Maine as Having Completed 
the Course of Military Science and Tactics 
George Wilmot Carle, Portland, Maine. 
James Harvey McClure, Bangor, Maine. 
Calvin Arthur Sweet, South Atkinson, Maine. 
Arthur Craig Whittier, Farmington, Maine. 
Howard Arthur Stanley, Beverly, Massachusetts. 
Charles Leon Foubert, Danbury, Connecticut. 
Horace Alden Hilton, Bangor, Maine. 



143 



The University of Maine 



CATALOGUE OF STUDENTS 



Major subjects are indicated as follows: Ag. Agriculture, Bl. Biology,. 
Ch. Chemistry, Cv. Civics, Ce. Civil Engineering, Ee. Electrical Engi- 
neering, Eh. English, Fy. Forestry, Gm. German, Gk. Greek, Hy. 
History, Lt Latin, Ms. Mathematics, Me. Mechanical Engineering, Ml. 
Modern Languages, Pm. Pharmacy, PI. Philosophy, Ps. Physics, Rm. 
Romance Languages. 



GRADUATE STUDENTS 
Balentine, Florence, B. A., Bl. Orono 

University of Maine, 1905 
Carr, Cleora May, B. S., Ml. Old Town 

University of Maine, 1903 
Davis, Grant Train, B. A., Ch. Orono 

University of Michigan, 1903 
Dow, Henry Kingman, B. A., Gm. Old Town 

University of Maine, 1905 
Fowles, Raymond Arthur, B. A., PI. Greenville 

University of Maine, 1905 
Gerrity, Helen Veazie, B. A., Ms. Bangor 

Mt. Holyoke, 1905 
Godfrey, Ethel, B. L., Eh. Bangor 

Smith College, 1903 
Grover, Archer Lewis, B. M. E., 
B. S., Ce. Orono 

University of Maine, 1899 and 1902 
Haskell, Horace Bray, Ph. B., Eh. Orono 

Taylor University, 1900 
Mitchell, Fred Carlton, B. S., Ps. Camden 

University of Maine, 1900 
Seabury, Ralph Lowe, B. S., Ch. Yarmouth 

University of Maine, 1905 
Swain, Pearl Clayton, B. A., Eh. Patten 

University of Maine, 1899 



College St. 

Old Town 

61 Main St. 

Old Town 

Greenville 

Bangor 

Bangor 

Mill St. 

Oak St. 

Camden 

Middle St. 

Patten 



Abbott, Herbert Lester, Ce. 
Bacon, Roy Sawtelle, Ag. 



SENIORS 

Bucksport 
Sidney 
144 



fi A T House 
301 Oak Hall 



The University of Maine 



Banks, Frank Arthur, Ce. 
Bearce, Edwin Freeman, Ee. 
Bearce, Henry Walter, Ps. 
Bearce, Winfield Dexter, Ee. 
Bennett, Arthur Guy, Ee. 
Bolt, Richard Arthur, Cv. 
Brockie, John Meikle, PI. 
Brown, Everett Dana, Hy. 
Burke, Walter Horace, Ee. 
Butterworth, Albert Jared, Ce. 
Campbell, Charles William, Ce. 
Carlson, Gotthard Wilhelm, Ee. 
Cassey, Sidney, Me. 
Churchill, Howard Lincoln, Fy. 
Colcord, Joanna Carver, Ch. 
Coligny, Guerric Gaspard, Ch. 
Crowell, Lincoln, Fy. 
Currier, Charles Ellsworth, Ee. 
Dolbier, William Ray, Ce. 
Edwards, Dayton James, Bl. 
Elliot, Samuel Gault, Ce. 
Elliott, Hallet Carroll, Ce. 
Elms, James William, Ch. 
Emery, Harry Alvah, Ce. 
Forbes, Clinton Fairfield, Ee. 
Frost, Walter Oscar, Fy. 
Glover, Philip Holden, Ce. 
Gray, Claude Albert, Me. 
Hamlin, Roy Gilbert, Ee. 
Harlow, Frederic Hall, Ag. 
Hews, Wellington Prescott, Ce. 
Hill, George Herbert, Ce. 
Hodgdon, Carolyn Adelle, Gk. 

Howard, Lester Boyton, Ee. 
Hoxie, Harold Shepherd, Ce. 
Hoxie, Harvey Hamlin, Ee. 
Johnson, Caleb Hartwell, Me. 
Jones, Gertrude May, Bl. 
Karl, Harold Louis, Ee. 
Kittredge, Raymond Brown, Ce. 
Lord, Ralph Edwin, Ce. 



Biddcford 


ATfl House 


Auburn 


Ben House 


Hebron 


2 A E House 


Auburn 


Ben House 


Paris 


$ K 2 House 


St. John, N. B. 


Bangor 


Old Town 


2 A E House 


South Paris 


309 Oak Hall 


Kennebunk 


2 A E House 


Southbridge, Mass. 


2 X House 


Ellsworth 


K 2 House 


Bethel 


$ K 2 House 


Lynn, Mass. 


OAT House 


BuckHeld 


fi A T House 


Searsport Mt. 


Vernon House 


Springfield, Mass. 


A T Q, House 


Dorchester, Mass. 


101 Oak Hall 


Brewer 


3> K 2 House 


Salem 


Pine St. 


Oxford 


$ K 2 House 


Rumford Point 


OAT House 


Patten 


OAT House 


Foxcroft 


A T House 


North Anson 


Ben House 


BuckHeld 


2 X House 


Rockland 


$ r A House 


Harrington 


Ben House 


B rid g ton 


211 Oak Hall 


Gorham, N. H. 


$ K 2 House 


Gorham 


$ K 2 House 


Ashland 


A T U House 


Saco 


2 A E House 


Hampden Comer 


Mt. Vernon 




[House 


Dover 


e E House 


Fairfield Center 


e E House 


Waterville 


e E House 


Nahant, Mass. 


$K2 House 


Corinna Mt. 


Vernon House 


Rockland 


2 X House 


Beverly, Mass. 


2 A E House 


Bangor 


Ben House 



145 



The University of Maine 



Lovett, Merton Rooks, Hy. 
McDermott, William Lawrence, Me. 
Nichols, Leroy Cleveland, Ee. 
Olds. Robert Franklin, Ce. 
Owen, George Stuart, Ce. 
Paige, James Lonsdale, Me. 
Perry, Estelle, Hy. 
Porter, Roy Hiram, Me. 
Prince, Charles Edward, Ee. 
Reed, Frank Radford, Jr., Ce. 
Reynolds, Thomas Harold, Ag. 
Richards, Earle Revere, Ce. 
Richardson, Alton Willard, Ag. 
Rogers, David Nathan, Fy. 
Ross, Harold Dockum, Ee. 
Sawyer, Edgar John, Ce. 
Sherman, Raphael Simmons, Ee. 
Simmons, John Percy, Ce. 
Smith, Ralph Seldon, Ee. 
Southard, Frederick Dean, Eh. 
Sparrow, Arthur Leonard, Me. 
Stanford, Edward Arthur, Ag. 
Stevens, Fred Oramel, Ce. 
Stewart, Frank Carroll, Ee. 
Tarbox, George Roger, Me. 
Wallace, James Gordon, Ce. 
Webber, Mary Frances, Lt. 
Weick, Frank Budge, Ce. 
Weymouth, Arthur Pettengill, Ee. 
Whitmore, Albert Ames, Hy. 
Worcester, Herbert Wheeler, Ce. 



Beverly, Mass. 
Biddeford 
Saco 
Lewis ton 
Portland 

Southbridge, Mass. 
Penobscot Mt. 

South Paris 
Kittery 

Rumford Falls 
Bastport 
New Gloucester 
Bethel 
Patten 
Skowhegan 
Milbridge 
Rockland 
Belfast 
Old Town 
Dorchester, Mass. 
South Orleans, Mass 
Lovell Center 
Milan, N. H. 
Farmington 
Machias 
Portland 

Bangor Mt. 

Springfield 
Dexter 
Fryeburg 
Stamford, Conn. 



2 A E House 

A T ft House 

2 A E House 

301 Oak Hall 

<i> T A House 

2 X House 

Vernon House 

2 A E House 



2 
2 A 

$ r 
$ K 



X House 

E House 

A House 

2 House 

Main St. 

K 2 House 

Forest St. 

K 2 House 

2 X House 

2 Pine St. 

Old Town 

$ f A House 

Forest St. 

2 A E House 

$K2 House 

9 E House 

2 A E House 

Ben House 

Vernon House 

e E House 

$TA House 

Mill St. 

109 Oak Hall 



JUNIORS. 



Aiken, Edith Nora, Lt. 
Alexander, Wra. Wesley Bannister, 
Alton, Francis Osgood, Ee. 
Austin, Alton Arthur, Ag. 
Balentine, Marion, Ms. 
Barrows, Arad Thompson, Ce. 
Barrows, Lucius Dwelley, Ce. 
Bates, John Thaxter, Me. 
Bean, Ernest Daniel, Ce. 



Brewer Mt. 

Ch. Everett, Mass. 
West Lynn, Mass. 
Ridlonville 
Orono 
Burleigh 
Foxcroft 
Calais 

Haverhill, Mass. 
146 



Vernon House 

ft A T House 

Mill St. 

K 2 House 

College St. 

16 Main St. 

2 A E House 

2 A E House 

302 Oak Hall 



The University of Maine 



Bean, Pony Ashley, Ce. 
Bird, Sidney Morse, 2nd, Ag. 
Black. Walter Wright, Me. 
Blanchard, Roy .Melville, Ce. 
Brann, Benjamin Erwin, Ce. 
Brawn, Elwin Dresser, Me. 
Brown, Anion Benjamin, Ce. 
Bucknam, Ralph Emerson, Ce. 
Burleigh, John Holmes, Eh. 
Burns, Caleb Edgar Slocum, Ag. 
Cayting, Arno Burr, Fy. 
Claflin, Francis Marsh Albee, Ch. 
Clayton, Robert Edmund, Ch. 
Coffin, Roy Selwin, Fy. 
Connell, Bennett Robert, Ee. 
Cummings, Elmer W., Ce. 
Davis, Charles Eugene, Ce. 
Devereux, Rosmar Styer, Ce. 
Druery, Edward James, Ch. 
Erskine, Fred Stoddard Neville, Ag. 
Eveleth, Harry Pope, Ee. 
Fagan, JamesPatrick Vincent, Bl. 
Foster, Roberto Mower, Ee. 
Galland, Joseph, Ce. 
Garland, Carlotte Nathaniel, PI. 
Gellerson, Rex C, Pm. 
Goodrich, Joe Kinsman, Cv. 
Green, Herbert Henry, Ag. 
Hall, William Dickson, Ml. 
Harlow, Edward Thomas, Ce. 
Harvell, John Perham, Me. 
Hayward, Guy Edwin, Ml. 
Hodgkins, Alden E., Ms. 
Hodgkins, Lincoln Hall, Ce. 
Holbrook, Franklin Pratt, Ce. 
Hooper, Elmer Guy, Ce. 
Hosmer, Fred Pote, Ch. 
Hussey, Erwin Howard, Ce. 
Hutchins, Wilbury Owen, Ce. 
Iversen, Arthur, Ce. 
Jordan, Victor Burns, Fy. 
Judkins, Ernest LaRoy, Ee. 



Albany 
Rockland 
Beverly, Mass. 
Cumberland Mills 
Waterville 
Dexter 
Lincolnville 
Bastport 
South Berwick 
Fort Fairfield 
Brewer 
Upton, Mass. 
Bangor 
Bangor 
Houlton 
Paris 
Bridgton 
Castine 
Augusta 
Boston, Mass. 
Greenville Junction 
Old Town 
Lisbon 
Biddcford 
Hampden 
Fort Fairfield 
Skowhegan 
Spencer, Mass. 
Rockland 
South Brewer 
Boston, Mass. 
Winthrop 

Damariscotta Mills 
Bunker Hill 
Brooks 

West Lynn, Mass. 
Rockland 
Guilford 
Orland 
Portage 
Hartland 
Skowhegan 



312 Oak Hall 
Ben House 
2 A E House 
306 Oak Hall 
North Main St. 
Ben House 

* T A House 
ft A T House 
A T ft House 
$ T A House 
in Oak Hall 
21 Middle St. 

K 2 House 
$ K 2 House 

2 X House 
312 Oak Hall 

e E House 

204 Oak Hall 

Oak Hall 

e E House 

K 2 House 

Old Town 

$ K 2 House 

ATfl House 

Commons 

e E House 

K 2 House 

3 Peter St. 

* T A House 
in Oak Hall 
207 Oak Hall 

* r A House 

4 Forest St. 
$ K 2 House 
101 Oak Hall 

Park St. 

A T ft House 

305 Oak Hall 

ft A T House 

2 X House 

College St. 

Oak Hall 



147 



The University of Maine 



Keirstead, Horton Wilmot, Ce. 
Knowlton, Herbert Austin, Ee. 
Lambe, Emerson Peavy, Ee. 
Lambe, Reginald Robert, Me. 
Lekberg, Carl Henry, Me. 
Lisherness, Ernest, Ce. 
Lord, Arthur Russell, Ce. 
MacDonald, Karl, Me. 
Maclnnes, Peter John, PI. 
McKenzie, Herman Ellis, Me. 
Macomber, Carlton Hambly, Me. 
Maddocks, Frank Everett, Ce. 
Malloy, Thomas Angelo, Ce. 
Mansfield, Mildred Charlotte, Lt. 
Martin, Charles Henry, Ce. 
Matthieu, Joseph Clarence, Ee. 
Merrill, Joseph Farrington, Ch. 
Nickels, Herbert Lewis, Ce. 
Orne, Sidney Baxter, Me. 
Packard, Harry Ellsworth, Ce. 
Pennell, Alcot Johnson, Ee. 

Peres, Henry Palacio, Ce. 
Perry, Donald Cushman, Ee. 
Perry, Tedcastle Bigelow, Ee. 
Philbrook, Earle Walter, Ce. 
Philbrook, Howard Grenville, Ee. 
Pierce, Stephen Franklin, Ce. 
Plummer, Arthur Bartlett, Fy. 
Purington, Heber Penn, Ce. 
Quint, Raymon Alton, Ee. 
Read, Carroll Arthur, Ee. 
Reed, Lowell Jacob, Ee. 
Ridge, Reginald, Ce. 
Rockwood, Noel Mumford, Me. 
Rollins, Deane Whittier, Cv. 
Rounds, Albert Prentiss, Ce. 
Russell, William Henry, Ce. 
St. Onge, Walter James, Ee. 
Sampson, Arthur Haskell, Ch. 
Scammon, William Francis, Eh. 
Schoppe, William Freeman, Ag. 



Oakland 


2 X House 


Pembroke 


Middle St. 


Calais 


207 Oak Hall 


Calais 


2 A E House 



Worcester, Mass. 2 X House 
North New Portland $ r A House 

Ipswich, Mass. 209 Oak Hall 

Belfast B9n House 

Ingonish, N. S. Bangor 

West Jonesport 205 Oak Hall 

Portsmouth, R. I. 310 Oak Hall 

Bluehill 305 Oak Hall 

Lewiston Mill St. 

Orono Bennoch St. 

Fort Fairfield <i> r A House 

Fannington Orono House 

Auburn Forest St. 

Cherryiield 6 Main St. 

Boothbay Harbor Orono House 

East Winthrop 2 A E House 

Melrose Highlands, Mass. 

Orono House 

Lima, Peru 104 Oak Hall 

Island Falls 16 Main St. 

Island Falls 16 Main St. 

Milan, N. H. Ben House 

Shelbume, N. H. Ben House 

Cooper's Mills e E House 
North New Portland $ r A House 

lay 21 Middle St. 

North Berwick Ben House 

Stillwater Stillwater 

Berlin, N. H. $ K 2 House 

Portland K 2 House 

Calais 54 North Main St. 

Farmington Falls <S> r A House 

Bridgton 211 Oak Hall 

East Boston, Mass. 203 Oak Hall 

Dover ft A T House 

Gorham 201 Oak Hall 

Berlin Mills, N. H. 54 N. Main St. 

West Auburn 2 A E House 



148 



The Unive 

Seamon, Percy Ralph, Ee. 
Simmons, Frederick Johnson, Cv. 
Smith, Herbert Henry, Ce. 
Stetson, Everett Halliday, Ce. 
Stetson, Howard Carlton, Ce. 
Stevens, Albert William, Ee. 
Stone, William Elmer, Me. 
Sturtevant, Walter Linwood, Ch. 
Swift, Porter LaForrest, Me. 
Talbot, Richard Foster, Ag. 
Tate, Edith Mabel, Eh. 
Tebbets, Charles Bucknam, Ce. 
Totman, Arnold Washington, Ce. 
Washburn, Willis Flye, Ch. 
Weld, Moses Waldo, Me. 
Williams, Benjamin Franklin, Ce. 
Wilson, Elmer Josiah, Ee. 
Wilson, Jesse D., Ce. 
Witham, Lester Clyde, Ce. 
Wyman, Abel Percival. Ce. 
York, Verne Jerome, Ee. 



Bagley, Edward Spaulding, Ch. 
Beedle, Arthur Lawrence, Ee. 
Black, Walter Lauriston, Ee. 
Boyle, Claude, Ch. 
Brown, Sarah Ellen, Gk. 
Brownell, Chester Arthur, Ce. 
Capen, Howard Benjamin, Ee. 
Chase, Daniel, Ms. 
Chase, Mary Ella, Eh. 
Chase, Mildred, Ms. 
Cobb, William Alfred, Ce. 
Coleman, Everett Clinton, Ch. 
Collins, Bernard Ira, Ce. 
Cram, Edward Winslow, Cv. 
Cummings, Robert Lincoln, Me. 
Davis, Raymond Earl, Ce. 
Dixon, Leon Snell, Ce. 
Dow, Owen Oscar, Cv. 
Draper, Clifford Lester, Ee. 



sit\ of Maine 




Roxbury, Mass. 


107 Oak Hall 


Morrill 


Oak Hall 


East Corinth 


Main St. 


Auburn 


K 2 House 


Auburn 


$ K 2 House 


Belfast 


Ben House 


South Brezver 


$ K 2 House 


Bangor 


Ben House 


Norway 


3> K 2 House 


Andover 


2 A E House 


East Corinth 


Mt. Vernon House 


Auburn 


Forest St. 


Fairfield 


K 2 House 


China 


A T ft House 


Old Town 


Old Town 


North Islesboro 


A T ft House 


Lynn, Mass. 


2 X House 


Brunswick 


North Main St. 


North Anson 


202 Oak Hall 


Skowhegan 


2 A E House 


Bangor 


Bangor 


OMORES. 

Woodfords 


Ben House 


South Gardiner 


Main St. 


Sandypoint 


Myrtle St. 


Dover 


A T ft House 


Old Town 


Mt. Vernon House 


Newport, R. I. 


e E House 


Eastport 


Ben House 


Baring 


2 A E House 


Blue hill 


Mt. Vernon House 


Blue hill 


Mt. Vernon House 


Auburn 


* K 2 House 


Roxbury, Mass. 


ft A T House 


Haverhill, Mass. 


Mill St. 


Portland 


K 2 House 


G or ham 


* T A House 


Rumford Falls 


e E House 


Orono 


College St. 


Hiram 


* r A House 


Stoneham, Mass. 


e E House 


149 





The University of Maine 



Durgin, Albert Guy, Ch. 
Ellis, Harold Milton, Eh. 
Emery, Francis Philip, Ee. 
Estabrooke, Elizabeth Read, Eh. 
Farnsworth, James Pitt, Ee. 
Fellows, Raymond, Cv. 
Fenn, Charles Henry, Ce. 
Files, Frederick Whitney, Ee. 
Fish, Frank Willard, Fy. 
Fogler, Ben Baker, Me. 
French, Frank Danford, Ce. 
Gannett, James Adrian, Ee. 
Hanscom, Arthur Snow, Ce. 
Hardison, Grover Merrill, Ce. 
Harris. Bell Curry, Gm. 
Hatch. Roy Otis, Ch. 
Heath, Ralph Curtis, Ce. 
Hill, William Andrew, Ce. 
Hopkins. George Jesse, Me. 
Howard, Elwood Lee, Ee. 
Irish, Joshua Swett, Ag. 
Johnson, Charles Arthur, Ee. 
Jordan, Ralph Dexter, Me. 
Keating, Joseph Sylvester, Cv. 
Kendregan, John Thompson, Ce. 
Knight, George Raymond, Ee. 
Lancaster, Howard Augustus, Ce. 
Lanpher, Stacy Clifford, Gm. 
Libby, Paul, Ce. 
Locke, Samuel Barry, Fy. 
Loft, John Edgar, Ce. 
Lord, Leslie Roland, Ee. 
McNamara, William Stephen, Ce. 
Meserve, Claude Pitman, Me. 
Milliken. Earle Linwood, Ee. 
Miner, Henry LeRoy, Ch. 
Mitchell, Roby Lawton, Cv. 
Morton, Fred Constine, Ee. 
Neal, Arthur Francisco, Ce. 
Osgood, William Thompson, Ee. 
Penney, Paul Stinchfield, Ce. 
Perkins, Howard Lewis, Ee. 



Orono 

Hingham, Mass. 
Eastport 
Orono 
Milbridge 
Bucksport 
Portland 
Portland 
Orono 
Skowhegan 
J ones port 
Yarmouth 
Leeds Junction 
Caribou 
Sherman Mills 
West Groton, Mass. 
Revere, Mass. 
Winter port 
Bath 

Sangerville 
Gorham 

Berlin Mills, N. H. 
Lewiston 
Red Beach 
Rockland, Mass. 
North Water ford 
Old Town 
Sebec 

Somersworth, N. H. 
West Paris 
Springfield, Mass. 
Poquonock, Conn. 
Millvillc, Mass. 
North Bridgton 
Westbrook 
Haverhill, Mass. 
West Newiield 
South Windham 
North Berwick 
Garland 
Augusta 
Augusta 



Middle St. 
3 Peters St. 

2 A E House 

Main St. 

6 E House 

<£ T A House 
2 X House 
O E House 

A T Q House 
2 X House 
K 2 House 

* K 2 House 

* T A House 
to A T House 

Old Town 

Myrtle St. 

212 Oak Hall 

<i> r A House 

B6n House 

6i Mill St. 

ii2 Oak Hall 

26 Peters St. 

to A T House 

Main St. 

K 2 House 

16 Main St. 

Old Town 

GAT House 

302 Oak Hall 

2 X House 
North Main St. 

2 X House 
212 Oak Hall 
2 A E House 
A T to House 
A T to House 
$ T A House 
112 Oak Hall 
Ben House 

Myrtle St. 
210 Oak Hall 
210 Oak Hall 



I50 



The University of Maine 



Reynolds, Carl Wilson, Ee. 


Bar Harbor 


9 E House 


Rich, Harry Herbert, Ee. 


Bangor 


K 2 House 


Robinson, Philip Increase, Ee. 


Waterville 


$ K 2 House 


Sargent, Leslie Wheeler, Me. 


South Brewer 


BGn House 


Sawyer, William Robert, Me. 


Milbridge 


K 2 House 


Skofield, Perley Fiske, Ag. 


Houlton 


Campus 


Smith, Frank Folsom, Ce. 


Rumford Falls 


2 A E House 


Smith, Herman Brackett, Ee. 


Saco 


$K2 House 


Smith, Oscar Franklin, Ee. 


Calais 


A T ft House 


Smith, Raymond Judson, Fy. 


Skowhegan 


* T A House 


Steward, Robert Kent, Ce. 


Skowhegan 


$ T A House 


Sturtevant, Merle Alton, Ps. 


Hebron 


2 A E House 


Tabor, Ralph Sanborn, Ce. 


Haverhill, Mass. 


A T ft House 


Toner, Ernest Leroy, Fy. 


Auburn 


2 X House 


Trask, Warren Dudley, Ce. 


Augusta 


K 2 House 


Vickery, Earle Nelson, Ee. 


Pitts-field 


2 X House 


Wakefield, Sylvia Serena, Ml. 


Saco Mt. 


Vernon House 


Weston, Clarence McLellan, Ce. 


Madison 


College St. 


Wilbur, Walter Edmund, Ee. 


Pembroke 


21 Middle St. 


Wildes, Gordon Lunt, Ce. 


Skowhegan 


K 2 House 


FRESHMEN 




Albee, Guy Edwin 


Machias 40 


North Main St. 


Austin, Thomas Dillon 


Farming ton 


A T ft House 


Barber, Clarence Wallace 


Woodfords 


Mill St. 


Barron, George Frank 


Norway 


Forest St. 


Bennet, DaCosta FitzMaurice 


Lubec 


G E House 


Bibber, Ray Odin 


Bast port 


7 Main St. 


Black, William Milgate 


Belfast 


308 Oak Hall 


Blake, Harold Edwin, 


Saco 


Park St. 


Bowman, Harold Melville 


Salmon Falls, N. H., 


North Main St. 


Brann, Bertrand French 


Bangor 


Bangor 


Brewer, Ernest Malcolm 


Bar Harbor 


ft A T House 


Brimmer, George Hollis 


Brewer 


Ben House 


Brown, Wallace Francis 


Yarmouth 


Forest St. 


Bruce, Herbert Putnam 


Lynn, Mass. 


E House 


Carlisle, George Thomas 


North Bdgecomb 


57 Mill St. 


Carter, Warren Alfred 


Nobleboro 


16 Main St. 


Chase, Florence Polleys 


Baring Mt. 


, Vernon House 


Chandler, Bernard Albert 


New Gloucester 


*K2 House 


Clement, James Donald 


Belfast 


308 Oak Hall 


Clemons, Samuel Wadsworth 


Hiram 


A T ft House 



151 



The University of Maine 



Cleveland, Charles Calvin 
Collins, John Lambert 
Conner, Warren Edward 
Corson, Preston Llewellyn 
Cragin, Philbur Leroy 
Davis, Cyrus Hersey 
Eddy, Harold Frederick 
Edgcomb, Leslie 
Elliott, Allen Edrick 
Emerson, Walter Lee 
Estabrooke, Carl Bertrand 
Farrar, Cecil C. 
Farwell, Howard Lovering 
Finnigan, Edward Joseph 
Fogler, William Andrews 
French, Guy Clifton 
Fulton, Charles Melville 
Gardner, Edward Earle 
Gerrity, Joe Warren 
Gould, Barnet Benjamin 
Haggett, Harold Daniel 
Haley, William Washburn 
Flail, Bertram Mellor 
Hall, Earle Wilmer 
Ham, Philip Winthrop 
Hamlin, Dunton 
Hamor, George Howard 
Harvey, Florence Evelyn 
Harvey, Walter Ora 
Harvey, Willis Lake 
Hayward, Ralph Simpson 
Henry, Ralph Morton 
Higgins, Harrison Parker 
Hilton, William 
Hinckley, Edward Benjamin 
Hinkley, Willard Merrill 
Hodgins, Robert Lyle 
Hutcbinson, Arthur Nash 
Jackson, Ralph Lysander 
Jewett, John Nelson 
Johnson, Howard Rich 
Jones, Laurence Vivian 
Keating, Edmund Bernard 



Skowhegan 

Gardiner 

Auburn 

Wilton 

Woodfords 

Woodfords 

Bangor 
Kennebunk 

Somerville, Mass. 

Or 0110 

Or ono 

Guilford 

Dorchester, Mass. 
Bangor 

West Rockport 

Skowhegan 

Effingham Falls, N. 

Bast Machias 

Bangor 

Salem, Mass. 

Bath 

Fort Fair-field 

Lazvrence, Mass. 

New Portland 

Livermore Falls 

Orono 

Bar Harbor 

Orono 

Kenduskeag 

Orono 

Orono 

Cumberland Mills 

Somerville, Mass. 

Greenville 

Hinckley 

West Jonesport 

Hampden 
Cherry field 

Jefferson 
Cherry field 

Portland 

Bangor 

Salem, Mass. 

152 



Pine St. 

Main St. 

$ K 2 House 

21 Middle St. 

63 Mill St. 

Mill St. 

Bangor 

North Main St. 

K 2 House 

Main St. 

Main St. 

Old Town 

<*> r A House 

103 Oak Hall 

2 X House 

303 Oak Hall 

H. Myrtle St. 

2 A E House 

K 2 House 

Mill St. 

OAT House 

fi A T House 

2 A E House 

Forest St. 

$K2 House 

Main St. 

fi A T House 

Main St. 

North Main St. 

Main St. 

Main St. 

63 Mill St. 

2 A E House 

$ K 2 House 

* K 2 House 

2 X House 

$ T A House 

2 X Ho"se 

2 A E House 

2 X House 

North Main St. 

K 2 House 

Mill St. 



The University of Maine 



Keith, Ballard Freese 
Kimball, Winfield Alfred 
Kinghorn, Charles Wesley 
Knight, Frederick Daniel 
Littlefield, Joseph Philip 
Littlefield, Philip Henry 
Lockyer, Scott Sylvester 
Lynch, John Philip 
McKay, John Knox 
MacLean, Daniel Wallace 
Marsh, Harold Pinkham 
Mason, Jesse Ham 
Mayo, Clarence Arthur 
Mayo, Norman Haskell 
Merriman, Merle Eli 
Michaels, Chellis Hiram 
Miller, Harold Redmere 
Milliken, Sewall 
Mooney, Percy Patrick 
Moor, Leon Russell 
Moore, Irving Hartwell 
Morgan, Edwin Randolph 
Morrell, Harry Edwin 
Morrison, Robley Howe 
Morrison, Roy 
Morton, Edward Watts 
Nash, Henry Leighton 
Nason, Charles Jewell 
Paine, Charles Brooks 
Paine, Sherman Rogers 
Parker, Horace Albion 
Patterson, Alfred Bassett 
Pettegrow, Herbert Tracy 
Pike, Lewis Freeman 
Plumly, Clinton Alley 
Pray, Elmer Onsville 
Randall, James William 
Ray, Vinton Royal 
Rich, Harold Arthur 
Richardson, Frank Cummings 
Richardson, Irene Clara 
Ringwall, Frederick Algot 
Roberts, Benjamin Lewis 



Old Town 
Norway 
Yarmouthville 
Limerick 
Ogunquit 
Portland 
Eustis 

South Berwick 
Houlton 
East port 
Bangor 

Beverly, Mass. 
Hampden Corner 
Blue Hill 
Portland 
Belfast 

South Berwick 
West Scarboro 
Bangor 
Ellsworth 
ReadHeld 
Sangerville 
Lewiston 
Rumford Falls 
Saco 

Kennebunk 
Cherry field 
Hampden 
Eastport 
East port 
Liver more Falls 
Wins low 
East Machias 
Milton, N. H. 
Lincoln 
Kittery 
Freeport 
Sabattus 
Bangor 
Jefferson 
Old Town 
Bangor 
Bangor 

153 



$ r A House 

$ K 2 House 

Forest St. 

* K 2 House 
A T House 

Myrtle St. 
A T to House 
ATfl House 

2 X House 

College St. 
Ben House 

2 X House 
Ben House 

2 X House 

* K 2 House 
e E House 

North Main St. 

Park St. 

Bangor 

310 Oak Hall 

Ben House 

10 Pine St. 

Main St. 

College St. 

A T to House 

2 A E House 

2 A E House 

<1> r A House 

Myrtle St. 

$TA House 

307 Oak Hall 

307 Oak Hall 

Oak St. 

K 2 House 

$ K 2 House 

A T to House 

fiAT House 

Main St. 

Bangor 

2 A E House 

Old Town 

K 2 House 

e E House 



The University of Maine 



Rollins, Kenneth Albert 
Rowe, Benjamin Elwood 
Scales, James Grindle 
Shatney, Thomas Franklin 
Shaw, Christine Myrtle 
Shaw, Cora Mae 
Sherman, Raymond Richard 
Simmons, Francis Eaton 
Smith, Allen G. 

Smith, Dexter Southworth Johnson 
Smith, Harry Woodbury 
Smith, Wilbur Olin 
Steward, Helen Farwell 
Sutton, Harry Edward 
Sweetser, George Roy 
Taylor, Russell Shepard 
Thomas, Deane Stanley 
Torrey, Guy Ellicott 
Towle, Elton LaForrest 
Walker, Harold Edward 
Wescott, Thurman Cony 
White, Harry Alfred 
Williams, Thomas Charles 
Woodbury, Dwight Augustus 
Worth, Edna Curtis 



Farmington Falls 
Oxford 
Guilford 
Orono 
Orono 
Orono 

Belfast 40 

Rockland 
Jonesport 
Brewer 
Sangerville 
Peabody, Mass. 
Skowhegan Mt. 

Orono 
Hampden 
Skowhegan 
Yarmouthville 
Dorchester, Mass. 
Portland 
Sabattus 
Patten 
Lynn, Mass. 
Salem, Mass. 
Beverly, Mass. 
East Corinth Mt 



$ r A House 

308 Oak Hall 

3> r A House 

28 Pine St. 

Park St. 

Park St. 

North Main St. 

B0n House 

Forest St. 

Brewer 

10 Pine St. 

Myrtle St. 

Vernon House 

Bennoch St. 

Main St. 

6 E House 

Forest St. 

K 2 House 

$ r A House 

Main St. 

12 Main St. 

K 2 House 

Mill St. 

2 X House 

Vernon House 



SHORT PHARMACY COURSE 



Gordon, Harry Leon 
Marr, Leon Herbert 
Preble, Ralph Huston 
Williams, Roger Orland 



Beal, Arthur Nathaniel 
Butterfield, Carroll Curtis 
Findlen, Thomas Miles 
Hinckley, Joseph Thomas 
Parkin, John William 
Riddle, Harry Colburn 
Rogers, Frederick Drummond 
Saunders, William Houston 
White, Frank M. 



SECOND YEAR 

Augusta 
Farmington 
Machias 
Hartland 

FIRST YEAR 

Lisbon Falls 
Dover 
Caribou 
Blue hill 
Lisbon Falls 
Monson 
Richmond 
Deer Isle 
Vinalhaven 

154 



Ben House 

Orono House 

e E House 

Campus 



309 Oak Hall 

College St. 

Myrtle St. 

2 X House 

105 Oak Hall 

North Main St. 

2 X House 

Commons 

North Main St. 



The University of Maine 



SPECIAL 
Alexander, Jefferson Leavitt 
Anderson, William Lewis, Jr. 
Bailey, Frank Linwood 
Berry, Albert Ivory 
Blaisdell, Ernest Dennison 
Bolt, Ernest Albert 
Colcord, Maude Brown 
Corrigan, Margaret Mary 

Crowell, Philip Holmes 
Day, Lester Scott 
Deering, George P. 
Dingley, Donald L. 
Drew, Pierce Allen 
Farnham, Harry Lester 
Fisher, Ray Haynes 
Flint, Adelaide Eleanor 
Godfrey, Harold Ernest 
Greany, Thomas H. 
Hackett, Joseph James 
Hall, Harold Worcester 
Hardy, Simeon Joseph 
Hayward, Bertha Vivian 
Jacobs, Joseph 
Knight, Mary Warren 
Knight, Mattie Grover 
Leslie, Edward Warren 
Libby, Eva Catherine 
McKenney, Blake 
May, Seth 

Mitchell, Sanford Stevens 
Moody, Ralph Henry 
Nash, Clara Augusta 
Palmer, Edwin Lindsay 
Pickering, Winthrop Hamilton 
Potter, Benjamin Laurence 
Potter, Robert Eaton 
Prentiss, Margaret Montgomery 
Smith, George Lewis 
Southwick, Everett Frost 
Spearen, Ellenor Ella 



STUDENTS 
Eastport 
Hartland 
South Harpswell 
Biddeford 
Oakland 
St. John, West N. B. 



2 A E House 

* r A House 

A T fi House 

10 Pine St. 

E House 

Bangor 



Scarsport Mt. Vernon House 
Noroton Heights, Conn. 

[Mt. Vernon House 

Bangor A T f2 House 

Wiscasset Mill St. 

Winslow's Mills Middle St. 

Portland E House 

Orono B n House 

Lynn, Mass. E House 

Pepperell, Mass. College St. 

Orono Main St. 

Sabattus Main St. 
Fall River, Mass. 2 Bennoch St. 

Newport, R. I. Oak Hall 

Augusta B II House 

East Hampden 105 Oak Hall 

Orono Main St. 
West Boylston, Mass. 3 Middle St. 

Deer Isle Mt. Vernon House 

Deer Isle Mt. Vernon House 

Millinocket 10 Pine St. 

Hartland Mt Vernon House 

Bangor Bangor 

Auburn Bangor 

Cherryiield Main St. 

Auburn K 2 House 

Orono Mill St. 

Portland © E House 

New Haven, Conn. College St. 

Litchfield Main St. 

Bath 2 X House 

Bangor Bangor 

Long Cove 2 X House 

Peabody, Mass. Myrtle St. 

Orono College St. 

55 



The University of Maine 



Thomas, Searle Fowler 
Todd, Arthur Lee 
Torre, Miguel Angel de la 
Tremaine, Arthur Edward 
Whipple, LeRoy Francis 
Witherell, Louis Von 
Wood, Frank Foster 
Yates, Howard Douglass 
Zatlin, Louis Edward 



Lincoln 
Georgetown 
Matanzas, Cuba 
Halifax, N. S. 
Pawtucket, R. I. 
Oakland 
Old Town 
Atlanta, Ga. 
St. Louis, Mo. 



$ K 2 House 

Myrtle St. 

Bennoch St. 

Oak Hall 

K 2 House 

Ben House 

Old. Town 

K 2 House 

Mill St. 



Abbott, Stephen Edward 
Bickford, Harold Frank 
Carver, James Herbert 
Houghton, Ervin Albert 
Packard, Ransom C. 



SCHOOL OF AGRICULTURE 

SECOND YEAR 

Bethel Park St. 

North Dixmont ' Park St. 

Vinal Haven North Main St. 

Fort Fairfield OAT House 

Brockton, Mass. Campus 



Colley, Albert Chester 

Harper, Morrell 

Nash, Herbert 

Ricker, Fred Page 

Soule, Malcolm Montgomery 

Stratton, Chester Winfield 

Worcester, Benjamin C. 



P1RST year 

Denmark 
Biddeford 
South Windham 
Turner 

South Freeport 
Hancock 
Columbia 



Bennoch St. 

Park St. 

37 Mill St. 

Bennoch St. 

Myrtle St. 

Oak St. 

Myrtle St. 



SUMMER SESSION 
Abbreviations indicate subjects taken. 



Albee, Rena Belle 
Allen, Caroline French 
Annis, Julia Mae 
Bearce, Edwin Freeman 
Bolt, Ernest Albert 
Bolt, Richard Arthur 
Bragden, Kenneth Edward 
Brown, Amon Benjamin 
Burnham, Bertha Williams 
Capron. Maude Estelle, B. 

Wellesley, 1896 
Chaney, Irwin Wayne 



A. 



Wiscasset 


Rm, Eh. 


, Ps., 


Ag. 


Bangor 


PI. 


, Hy. 


, Bl. 


Camden 


Ms. 


, Eh. : 


, PL 


Auburn 




Rm. 


, PL 


St. John, N. B. 


Gm. 


, PL, 


Eh. 


St. John, N. B. 


Hy., 


Gm., 


Ag. 


Bast Sullivan 




Rm., 


Ch. 


Lincolnville 




Rm. 


, PI. 


Old Town 




Rm., 


Eh. 


Pawtuckctt, R. 


/. 




Ps. 


Brunswick 






Bl. 


156 









The University of Maine 



Corrigan, Margaret Mary 



Noroton Heights, Conn. 

[Rm, Eh., Ms. 



Colcord, Joanna Carver 


Sears port 






Ch. 


Craft, Ralph 


Lincoln 






Ms. 


Dolbier, William Ray 


Salem 


Eh., 


Rm., 


Ps. 


Estabrooke, Carl Bertrand 


Orono 




Ms., 


Rm. 


Estabrooke, Marion Corthell 


Orono 






Rm. 


Fellows, Dorothy Russell 


Orono 






Rm. 


Floyd, Charles Wallace 


Wytopitlock 




BL, 


, PI. 


Foley, Anna Gertrude 


Worcester, Mass. 




Bl, 


Hy. 


Fowler, Abbie Mary 


Sangerville Bl. 


, Eh., 


Ms, 


Rm. 


Gerrity, Joe Warren 


Bangor 




Ms., 


Rm. 


Grant, Edith M. 


Bangor 


Gm., 


Rm, 


Ag. 


Hagarty, Laura Dunbar 


Buffalo, N. Y. 






Eh. 


Hall, Earle Wilmer 


North Anson 




Ms, 


Rm. 


Hamlin, Charles Mayo 


Orono 




Rm., 


Gm. 


Henry, Mary Catherine 


Worcester, Mass. 




Bl, 


Hy. 


Kelleher, Marion Gertrude 


Orono 




PI, 


Ag. 


Knight, Mary Warren 


Deer Isle 


Rm. 


, Gm. 


, Lt. 


Knight, Mattie Grover 


Deer Isle 


Rm. 


, Gm, 


, Lt. 


McMahon, Harold Cousins 


Brewer 




Ms, 


Rm. 


Martin, Charles Henry 


Fort Fairfield 


Ms, 


, Hy. 


, PI. 


Mayers, Clayton Wadleigh 


Dresden 




Ms. 


, Ps. 


Mitchell, Fred Carleton, B. S 


Camden 




Ps. 


, Ch. 


University of Maine, 


1900 








Moody, Frank Wilson 


Hallowell 




Ps. 


, Ch. 


Paine, Sherman Rogers 


Eastport 


Ch 


, Lt, 


Hy. 


Peabody, Ellen Holway 


Machias 


Eh 


, Rm 


.., Bl. 


Plumly, Clinton Alley 


Lincoln 


Ms, 


Rm. 


, Eh. 


Reynolds, Thomas Harold 


Eastport 




Rm, 


Gm. 


Rice, Marie Cecilia, B. S., M. 


S. Bangor 


Bl, 


Rm. 


, Eh. 


University of Maine, 


1902, 1903 








Ross, Harold Dockum 


Skowhegan 




Ps. 


, Hy. 


Sanders, Thomas Andrew 


Sangerville 


Bl 


, Lt. 


, Hy, 


Sargent, Hannah Butman 


Alton 


PI 


, Bl. 


, Ag. 


Sargent, Jessie 


Alton 


Rm 


, Ps. 


, Ag. 


Shatney, Thomas Frank 


Orono 






Ms. 


Simmons, Frederick Johnson 


Morrill 




Gm. 


, Hy. 


Smith, Edward Henry, B. M. 


E. Ashville 






Ch. 


University of Maine, 


1900 








Smith, Nathan Rideout, A. B 


Orono 






Ps. 


Bates College, 1895 










Stevens, Albert William 


Belfast 
157 






Ps. 



The University of Maine 



Steward, Helen Farwell 
Steward. Robert Kent 
Thompson, Blanche Evelyn 
Thompson, Harwell Cloud 
Toner, Ernest Leroy 
Wadsworth, Charles Sabin 
Ware, Amy Estell 
Wass, Clifton Eunis 
Whitney, Charles, B. S. 

Middlebury College, 1903 
Wood, Frank Foster 
Wright, Mary Payson 



Skowhegan Ms., Rm 

Skowhegan Ch., Ms., Rm., PI 

Santa Ana, Calif. Eh., Gm., Rm 
Harvey, III. 



Auburn 
Canton Point 
Bangor 
Sangerville 
Dresden Mills 

Old Town 
Wiscasset 



Ms., Bl. 

Ms., Bl. 

Ch., Ms. 

Eh., BL, Rm., Gm. 

Rm., Gm. 

Ch., Ms. 

Ms. 
Eh., Lt., Rm., Ps. 



SHORT WINTER 
Brown, Elou LeRoy 
Burgess, Millard Ashton 
Carver, Maud Mahala 
Glover, Howard Edward 
Graham, William Thomas 
Haseltine, Fred Leonard 
Koehler, Louis Cleveland 
Patten, Ullyses Grant 
Reed, Florence Elva 



COURSES IN 
Norway 
Caribou 
North Bangor 
Hebron 
Portland 
Dexter 

Southampton, Mass. 
Orono 
Gardiner 



AGRICULTURE 

Park St. 

2 Bennoch St. 

Campus 

207 Oak Hall 

Orono House 

2 Bennoch St. 

2 Bennoch St. 

Crosby St. 

2 Bennoch St. 



THE COLLEGE OF LAW 

GRADUATE STUDENTS 

Blanchard, Benjamin Willis, LL. B. Bangor 

University of Maine, 1904 
Bowker, Edgar Marshall, LL. B. Whitefield, N. H 

George Washington University, 1902 
Bridges, Ansel Harrison, LL. B. Old Town 

University of Maine, 1904 
Brown, Leon Gilman Carleton, LL.B. Milo 

University of Maine, 1905 
Cook, Harold Elijah, LL. B. 

University of Maine, 1900 
Davis, Waldo Trevor, B. A., LL. B 

Dartmouth College, 1901. 
Dunn, Patrick Henry, LL. B. 

University of Maine, 1902 



18 Congress St. 



Old Town 



Waterville 

Worcester, Mass. 
University of Maine, 1905. 
Bangor Bass Building 



158 



The University of Maine 



Folsom, LeRoy Rowell, B. S. South Norridgewock 

University of Maine, 1895 
Foster, Walter Herbert, LL. B. Dorchester, Mass. 

. University of Maine, 1905 
Hight, Clarence Bertram, LL. B. Dexter 

University of Maine, 1904 
Johnson, William Asbury, LL. B. Milo 

University of Maine, 1905 
Linehan, Daniel Joseph, LL. B. Haverhill, Mass. 

University of Maine, 1905 
Lord, Harry, LL. B. Bangor 

University of Maine, 1902 
Merrill, John Bryant, LL. B. Bangor 

University of Maine, 1904 
Noble, Ernest Eugene, B. A., LL. B. Portland 

Colby College, 1897. University of Maine, 1903 
Putnam, Varney Arthur, B. A., LL. B. Danforth 

Colby College, 1899. University of Maine, 1902 
Plumstead, Frank, B. A., LL. B. Bangor Hammond St. 

Bates College, 1896. University of Maine, 1901 
Record, Lewis Stillman, Ph. B., LL. B. Worcester, Mass. 

Brown University, 1902. University of Maine, 1905 



82 Cumberland St. 



18 Jefferson St. 



Reid, Charles Hickson, LL. B. Bangor 

University of Maine, 1903 
Robinson, Curville Charles, LL. B. Flatbush, N. Y. 

University of Maine, 1905 
Robinson, William Henry, LL. B. Bangor 

University of Maine, 1902 
Selkirk, Robert William, LL. B. Boston, Mass. 

University of Maine, 1902 
Violette, Nil Louis, B. A., LL. B. Van Buren 

St. Mary's College. University of Maine, 1903 
Wall, Erastus Lewis, B. A., LL. B. Easton Center 

Bates College, 1902. University of Maine, 1905 
Waterhouse, William Henry, LL. B. Old Town 

University of Maine, 1900 
Worster, George Henry, LL. B. 

University of Maine, 19 



Andrews, Percy Melville, B. A. 

Colby College, 1901 
Brooks, Gerry Lynn 



60 Lincoln St. 



42 Hammond St. 



Bangor 
5 


234 Center St. 


ENIORS 

Portland 


25 State St. 


Upton 


185 Pine St. 


159 





The University of Maine 



Brown, Winfield Scott, B. A. 


Dexter 


3 Granite Block 


Bates College, 1895 






Burnham, Elmer John 


Kittery 


239 Essex St. 


Cplby, James Adams 


Lynn, Mass. 


202 Union St. 


Conners, Charles Patrick, B. A. 


Bangor 


354 State St. 


Bowdoin College, 1903 






Cotton, Carl, B. A. 


Bangor 


125 Forest Ave. 


Colby College, 1900 






Cowan, George Albert 


Hampden 


Hampden 


Donnelly, James A. 


Houlton 


5 Maxim Court 


Doyle, Frederick Eugene, B. A. 


Ellsworth 


85 Second St. 


Holy Cross College, 1901 






Dunbar, Oscar Hall 


Jonesport 


28 Second St. 


Fox, Lewis Edwin 


Lovell 


20 Everett St. 


Harris, Moses Harry 


Auburn 


229 State St. 


Hasty, Percy Albert 


Bangor 


202 Union St. 


Laliberte, Joseph Alphonse 


Fort Kent 


239 Essex St. 


Littlefield, Eben Frank 


Brooks 


5 Maxim Court 


Moody, John Franklin, Jr., B. A. 


Auburn 


239 Essex St. 


Colby College, 1900 






Pike, George William 


Lisbon, N. H. 


91 Fifth St. 


Roix, William Richard 


Bucksport 


25 State St. 


Swett, Lucius Black 


West Hollis 


74 Third St. 


Warren, William Moncena, B. A. 


Bangor 


285 Center St. 


Bowdoin College, 1901 






JUNIORS 




Bangs, Harry Edgar 


Freedom 


301 Main St. 


Benner, George Henry 


West Townsend, 


Mass. 

[52 Second St. 


Buckley, John 


Union, Conn. 


144 Ohio St. 


Clark, Jerome Borden 


West Gouldsboro 


71 Summer St. 


DeWolfe, Robert William 


Portland 


239 Essex St. 


Dudley, John Perley 


Maple ton 


66 Charles St. 


Colby College 






Finnigan, James Patrick 


Bangor 


12 Summer St. 


Holman, William Harrison 


DixHeld 


316 Hammond St. 


Keegan, John Joseph 


Lubec 


144 Ohio St. 


Monroe, Edward Roy 


Portland 


105 Third St. 


Moore, Charles Dana Clift 


Lynn, Mass. 


350 Hammond St. 


O'Halloran, Thomas Henry 


Marlboro, Mass. 


76 Palm St. 


University of Vermont 






Perry, Lawrence Swift 


New Bedford, Mass. 125 Grove St. 


s 


160 





The University of Maine 



FIRST YEAR STUDENTS 



Blossom, Charles Albert Gooding 
Burgess, Frank Beaumont 
Bye, Terschak Franzoir 
Davidson, Edward Burleigh 
Driscoll, George Alexander 
Gardner, Silas Henry- 
Godfrey, Edward Rawson 

Bowdoin College, 1899 
Greeley, Harry Burton 
Leary, Thomas Edward, B. S. 

University of Maine, 1904 
Maxwell, James Davidson 
Nolan, Harry McDonald 
Otis, Thomas 
Rideout, Morton Howard 
Ridlon, Horace Denver 
Skillin, Carroll Brown 
Waldron, William Linscott, B. A. 

Colby College, 1899 



New Bedford, Mass. 315 Union St. 
Sangerville 4 Center St. Ave. 



Kennebunk 
York Village 
Springfield 
Brockton, Mass 

Bangor 



2 Union PI. 

29 Pond St. 

24 Ohio St. 

Beta Theta Pi 

[House, Orono 

172 Kenduskeag Ave. 



Hampden 
Bast Hampden 



Hampden 
East Hampden 



Bangor 27 Grant St. 

Haverhill, Mass. 100 Ohio St. 
New Bedford, Mass. 315 Union St. 

Bangor P. O. Box 104 

Stetson 23 Jefferson St. 

North Yarmouth 50 Charles St. 

Waterville 234 Center St. 



SPECIAL STUDENTS 



Chandler, Carroll Delwin 
Clark, Dana Leander 
Comerford, Michael Joseph 
Farnsworth, Omar Libby 
Lewis, Charles Goodell 



Bangor 

Belgrade Lakes 

Worcester, Mass. 

Caribou 

New Bedford, Mass. 



22 Short St. 

4 Eaton PI. 

201 Union St. 

183 Center St. 

66 Charles St. 



161 



The University of Maine 



GENERAL SUMMARY 



FACULTY 

Professors 33 

Instructors 22 

Lecturers 6 

Assistants 10 

Total 71 

College of Arts and Sciences 34 

College of Agriculture 34 

College of Technology 39 

College of Pharmacy 28 

Agricultural Experiment Station 11 

College of Law 14 

Members of the general faculty are included in the faculties of the 
separate colleges when they give courses that are required therein. 



students 

Graduate Students 12 

Seniors 74 

Juniors 113 

Sophomores 81 

Freshmen 131 

Short Pharmacy, Second year 4 

First year 9 13 

162 



The University of Maine 



Special Students 




49 


School of Agriculture, Second year 


5 




First year 


7 


12 


Summer Term 




6o 


Short Agricultural 




9 


College of Law, Graduate Students . . 


... 27 


ocinurs 


21 




Juniors 


13 




First year 


16 




Special Students 


5 


82 
636 


Duplicated 




25 


Total 




611 



CLASSIFICATION BY RESIDENCE 

Maine, by counties : 

Androscoggin 27 

Aroostook 25 

Cumberland 47 

Franklin 10 

Hancock 24 

Kennebec 26 

Knox 13 

Lincoln 14 

Oxford 38 

Penobscot 133 

Piscataquis 24 

Sagadahoc 5 

Somerset 27 

Waldo 20 

Washington 40 

York 28 



501 



163 



The University of Maine 



GENERAL SUMMARY 



FACULTY 

Professors 33 

Instructors 22 

Lecturers 6 

Assistants 10 

Total 71 

College of Arts and Sciences 34 

College of Agriculture 34 

College of Technology 39 

College of Pharmacy 28 

Agricultural Experiment Station 11 

College of Law 14 

Members of the general faculty are included in the faculties of the 
separate colleges when they give courses that are required therein. 



STUDENTS 

Graduate Students 12 

Seniors 74 

Juniors 113 

Sophomores 81 

Freshmen 131 

Short Pharmacy, Second year 4 

First year 9 13 



162 



The University of Maine 



Special Students 




49 


School of Agriculture, Second year 


5 






First year 


7 


12 


Summer Term 






6o 


Short Agricultu 


ral 




9 


T ~ le s € 


Seniors 


21 






Juniors 


13 






First year 


16 






Special Students 


5 


82 

636 


Duplicated 






25 


Total 






611 



CLASSIFICATION BY RESIDENCE 

Maine, by counties : 

Androscoggin 27 

Aroostook , 25 

Cumberland 47 

Franklin 10 

Hancock 24 

Kennebec 26 

Knox 13 

Lincoln 14 

Oxford 38 

Penobscot 133 

Piscataquis 24 

Sagadahoc 5 

Somerset 27 

Waldo 20 

Washington 40 

York 28 



501 



163 



The University of Maine 

California I 

Connecticut 6 

Georgia I 

Illinois I 

Massachusetts 74 

Missouri I 

New Hampshire 13 

New York 2 

Rhode Island 5 

Cuba 1 

New Brunswick 2 

Nova Scotia 2 

Peru I 



611 



CLASSIFICATION BY COLLEGES 

College of Arts and Sciences 117 

College of Agriculture 40 

College of Technology 353 

College of Pharmacy 19 

College of Law 82 

Total 611 



164 



The University of Maine 



INDEX 



PAGE 

Absence from examinations, 29 

Administration, officers of, 9 

Admission, 36 

by certificate 37 

by examination 37 

general requirements, . 36 

local examinations for, 37 

of college graduates, 36 

of special students, 37 

preliminary examinations for, 37 

requirements for 39 

to advanced standing, 36 

to College of Law, 128 

to special and extension 

courses, 37 

Agricultural chemistry 54 

Agricultural Experiment Station, 134 

building 20 

Council 6 

equipment, 135 

faculty, 134 

investigations, 136 

object 135 

publications 136 

Agriculture, College of 101 

correspondence courses 107 

extension courses 105 

faculty 101 

school course, 105 

special courses, 105 

■winter courses, 106 



PAGE 

A gronomy , 45 

course 103 

Alumni associations 7 

Alumni hall, 20 

Animal Industry 46 

course, 103 

Anthropology ; 55 

Appointments, 142 

Art 67 

museum, 22 

Arts and Sciences, College of, 89 

degrees, 90 

departments, 90 

faculty 89 

A ssociations, 25 

Astronomy,., 73 

Athletic field, 23 

Bacteriology 49 

Bibliography, 47 

Biological chemistry, 54 

Biology, 48 

Board 33 

Bond, 34 

Botany, 49, 93 

Buildings and equipment, 18 

Bulletins of the experiment sta- 
tion, 136 

Calendar, 3 

Catalogue, annual, 26 

Certificate, admission by 37 

Certificates, in agriculture, 106 



165 



The University of Maine 



PAGE 

Chemical course, 1 10 

Chemical Engineering course, — 111 

Chemistry, 51, 93 

Civil Engineering, 55 

course, 113 



Civics, 

Classical course, .. 
Coburn Hall 



Commencement, 
1905 



exercises of, 



54 

90 
19 

137 



list of speakers, 1905 142 

parts, 30 

Committees of the faculty, 14 

Courses of study : 

Agricultural, 103 

Agronomy, 103 

Animal Industry 103 

Chemical, 110 

Civil Engineering, 113 

Classical 90 

Electrical Engineering, 117 

Forestry 120 

Horticultural 103 

Law, 130 

Mechanical Engineering, 115 

Mining Engineering, 119 

Pharmacy, 122 

Scientific, 90 

Short Pharmacy, 125 

Special, 37 

Dairy building, 21 

Dairying, winter course 105 

Declamations, 60 

sophomore prize, 35, 60 

Degrees, 31 

advanced, 31 



PAGE 

Degrees conferred, 1905 137 

Departments of instruction, 45 

Deposit, 34 

Dormitories, 34 

Drawing, 78 

Drill, hall, 20, 28 

military, 27, 79 

Electrical engineering, 5S 

course, 117 

Endowment of the University, ... 17 

English, 60, 94 

Entomology, 49 

Entrance, dates of examinations, 37 

examinations, 

requirements, 

Essays, 

Establishment of the University, 

Examinations, arrearage 

entrance, 

rules, with regard to, 

Excuses, 29 

Expenses of students, 32, 99, 129 

Faculty, University 9 

A griculture, 101 

Arts and Sciences, 89 

Experiment Station 134 

Law 127 

Pharmacy, 122 

Summer term 91 

Technology, 109 

Farm buildings, 21 

Fees, laboratory 33 

Fernald Hall, 19 

Forestry, 63 

course, . . 120 



37 



29 



166 



The University of Maine 



PAGE 

Fraternity houses, 22 

French 84, 94 

German 64, 95 



Graduation, requirements for, 
Greek, 

preparatory courses, 

Gymnasium, 

Herbarium, 

Histology, animal 

plant, 



History 68,95 

Holmes Hall 20 

Honorary society, 26 

Honors, 30 

conferred, 1905, 142 

Horticultural, building 21 

course, 103 

Horticulture 69, 103 

special course in 105 

Iucome of the University, 17 

Infirmary, 22 

International law, 55 

Italian, 86 

Junior exhibition 35 

speakers, 1905, 142 

Kidder scholarship 35 

Kittredge loan fund, 35 

Laboratory charges, 33 

Latin, 70, 95 

Law, college of 127 

admission, 128 

advisory board 5 

courses, 130 

degrees, 129 

expenses, 129 



PAGE 

Law, college of: 

faculty, 127 

methods of instruction, 128 

Lectures, university, 27 

Summer term 98 

Library, 23, 99 

Loans, 34 

Logic 81 

Lord Hall, 20 

Maine Bulletin, 27 

Mathematics 73, 96 

Mechanical engineering, 75 

course, 1 15 

Mechanics and Drawing, 78 

Medicine, preparation for 91 

Military, drill, 27, 79 

instruction, 27 

science, courses in, 79 

science, requirements in, 27 

Military uniform, 28 

Mineralogy, 52 

Mining Engineering Course, 119 

Mt. Vernon House 22 

Museum, 24, 99 

Nature study, 96 

Oak Hall 19 

Observatory 20, 99 

Organization of the University,.. . 87 

Organizations, 25 

Pedagogy, 81, 97 

Pharmacy, college of, 80 

course, 123 

faculty, 122 

short course 125 

Phi Kappa Phi 26 



167 



The University of Maine 



PAGE 

Phi Kappa Phi, members 142 

Philological Club 25 

Philosophy, 81 

Physical training, 28 

Physics, 83, 98 



Physiology 

Political Economy, 

Power house 

Prizes, 

awarded, 1905, 

Publications, 

Reading room 

Regulations of the University, 



48 
54 
21 
35 
141 
26 
24 
29 



Reports, of the Experiment Sta- 
tion, 



136 
30 
26 
60 

84 



of standing, 

of the University, 

Rhetoric, 

Romance Languages 

Rooms 34, 129 

Scholarship honors 30 

Scholarships 35 

Scientific courses, 90 

Short courses 105 

Societies 25 

Sophomore prize declamations,.. 35, 60 

speakers, 1904 142 

Spanish 85 

Special courses, 105 

Special students, 37 

Students, catalogue of, 144 

number of, 162 

standing of 30 

Studies, quota of 29 



PAGE 

91 



Summer Term, 

courses, 93 

expenses, 99 

faculty 91 

Technology, college of 108 

faculty, 108 



Text-books, •. 

Theology, preparation for 

Treasurer, 

Trustees, board of, 

executive committee of 

meetings of, 3, 4 

Tuition, charges, 33 

loans 

University, charter, 

bulletins, 

buildings and equipment, . . 

circulars 

endowment, 

establishment, , 

Guild 

location, 

object, 

organization 

Studies, 

Veterinary Science, 

Wingate Hall, 



Winter courses, 106 

Women, admission of 36 

Worship, public, 29, 99 

Young Men's Christian Associa- 
tion 26, 29 



Zoology, 



4S 



1 68 










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■ Mm 



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UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS-URBANA 



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